America promotes Environmental investments in Africa
Juil22

America promotes Environmental investments in Africa

 America promotes Environmental investments in Africa By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) President and Chief Executive Officer Ray W. Washburne visited South Africa this week where he met with local banks to discuss investment opportunities to advance development in the country and highlight OPIC-supported projects. It’s the third stop on a six country trip to promote U.S. investment in the region, strengthen partnerships, and find opportunities to work with regional allies on projects that drive economic growth and stability throughout the region. Infrasalience is creating green jobs Among the projects Washburne visited was OPIC-supported SA Taxi which provides loans to entrepreneurs operating minibuses in South Africa. The minibuses are a key part of the South African transportation sector where approximately 67 percent of all travel in South Africa is on a minibus. Each vehicle is a small business which supports the operators, their families and their communities. Washburne met with a number of innovative American businesses and investors including Infrasalience, a company established by American entrepreneurs. The company has developed mobile green chemical plants which profitably transforms air pollution and waste water into sustainable green chemicals. By establishing a process to recycle and reuse industrial and infrastructure waste while simultaneously creating jobs, the company is helping to bring American ingenuity and business values to emerging markets. Exploring investment opportunities in Africa Washburne is traveling to Africa to explore investment opportunities and to highlight OPIC’s new Connect Africa initiative to invest more than $1 billion in transportation, technology and value chains on the continent. Earlier this month, Washburne earlier traveled to Zambia and Rwanda where he visited American coffee processing facilities and met with heads of state. His travel on the continent will continue to Botswana, Uganda, and Kenya where he will meet with senior government officials and visit OPIC supported projects. Africa is a longstanding priority for OPIC and accounts for about one-quarter of the agency’s $23 billion global portfolio. As part of his National Security Strategy, President Trump highlighted the need for a modernized approach by the U.S. government to development finance to help grow aspiring partners, promote economic relationships, and increase investment in regions important to American interests....

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Tabi Joda-Column: ” It is  time to reverse the trends!”
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Tabi Joda-Column: ” It is time to reverse the trends!”

Tabi Joda-Column: ” It is  time to reverse the trends!” In Nigeria, Ghana and Cameroon alone, 50 metric tons of plastic fragments food packages, straws and table water bottles and empty sachet water bags are drained into the Atlantic Ocean every day. But it is time to reverse the trends.  It is everyone’s responsibility not only governments to protect the planet.     Over the last ten years the amount of plastic bags produced and used worldwide surpass the amount produced and used during the whole of the 20th century. Regrettably, 50% of the plastic we use, we just use them once and throw away. If we can place in a heap the amount of plastic bags we throw away into the environment each year, it will stretch from earth to the moon and back twenty five times. Globally, more than one million plastic bags are used every minute and an average individual throws away approximately 185 kg of plastic waste per year. An average household dumps about 900kg of plastic waste in a year. Similarly, an approximate 500 billion plastic bags are used and 135 billion plastic water bottles are thrown away every year. Plastic waste accounts for around 10 percent of the total waste generated in households worldwide.   The disaster Risk!     Every piece of plastic in the ocean breaks down into segments such that pieces from a single liter of plastic bottle could end up on every beach throughout the world. Similarly, almost every farmland is partially covered by plastic. Apart from the harmful effects of plastic bags on animals, plants and aquatic life, the toxic chemical from plastic waste are harmful to the human body when absorbed. A study has shown that apart from Americans who have up to 93% of people tested positive for BPA (a plastic chemical), level of effect are even higher in other parts of the world especially Africa where recycling and waste management policies and orientations are low or even absent in most places. Other studies have shown that some of these compounds found in plastic have been known to alter human hormones or have other potential risk on human health.   Alongside the hazardous risks on human health, over one million sea birds and over 100,000 marine mammals are reportedly killed annually from toxins originating from plastic waste in our oceans. 44% of seabird species, 22% of cetaceans, 32% of sea turtle species and a growing list of fish species, crabs and prawns are killed by plastics or have their habitat altered by plastic in or around their bodies. Plastics also degrade soil quality leading to low crop productivity and consequently poverty,...

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