Tanzania –Natural Resources: “ Communities  must know their rights and obligations”- Report
Avr11

Tanzania –Natural Resources: “ Communities  must know their rights and obligations”- Report

Tanzania –Natural Resources: “ Communities  must know their rights and obligations”- Report   In a recent workshop held in Dar es Salaam ( Tanzania), experts discussed the recent publication  of the FAO Voluntary Guidelines on Responsible Governance Tenure. Feature.   By Deodatus Mfugale in Dar Es Salaam “Inadequate and insecure tenure rights increase vulnerability, hunger and poverty and can lead to conflict and environmental degradation when competing users fight for the control of the resources,”  an  UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), published recently.   The eradication of hunger and poverty, and the sustainable use of the environment, depend to a great extent on how communities gain access to land, fisheries and forests which in turn is regulated by the exiting tenure systems. Tenure systems define and regulate how communities gain access to natural resources, whether through formal law or informal arrangements.   However tenure systems increasingly face stress as the world’s growing population requires food security, and as environmental degradation and climate change reduces the availability of land, fisheries and forests. This has sparked stiff competition for resources among the various users with marginalized communities getting a raw deal. Many developing countries are endowed with abundant natural resources that could be used to improve the lives of their people and boost the economy of the respective countries. Countries with natural resources like forests, land, fisheries and wildlife could be treading with firm steps on the path to sustainable development but are struggling to feed their people most of whom live in abject poverty. Governance failure in ensuring secure tenure and access to natural resources has denied Tanzanian rural communities from benefitting from existing sources of livelihoods. They have thus failed to attain food security and reduce poverty at family level. How to understand the management of natural resources?  In a recent workshop held in Dar es Salaam to discuss the report, Dr Zacharia Ngeleja of Ardhi University said that the Guidelines contribute to achieving sustainable livelihoods, social stability, housing security, rural development, environmental protection and sustainable social and economic development. While the Voluntary Guidelines merely present principles and internationally accepted standards for practices for the responsible governance of tenure, countries can develop their own strategies and other conditions that may ease the application of the Guidelines. During the workshop participants underscored the need to educate communities on laws, policies, rules and procedures governing tenure of land, forests and fisheries so that they understand their rights and obligations. “If they understand the issues then they can demand for tangible benefits from their responsibility to conserve natural resources and only then can Responsible Governance of Tenure come into play. It...

Read More
Sustainable Development: Women in Tanzania are fighting for equal rights
Sep23

Sustainable Development: Women in Tanzania are fighting for equal rights

Sustainable Development: Women in Tanzania  are fighting for equal rights By Deodatus Mfugale     In  Asha Kadgo, a Land Tights Monitor in Uhambingeto Village in Kilolo District of Iringa Region in Tanzania’s Southern Highlands. Land Rights Monitors help to resolve land-based conflicts in their communities, provide paralegal guidance and raise awareness on landrights in their communities.          ...

Read More
COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania
Juil14

COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania

COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania Many people remember the last rainy season in May. It has started unusually late. But it has affected people.There are views that the erratic rainy seasons and the high intensity of rainfall are caused by climate change and some negative impacts are now unavoidable. These consequences of human-induced climate change often result in loss and damage.  Analysis by DeodatusMfugale*.     Dar es Salaam July 14, 2017 Many people lost their property Many people remember the last rainy season in May. It has started unusually late. But it has affected people. Residents of Tanga city, located on the Tanzanian northern coast close to the Kenyan border, were pounded by  heavy downpour recently. It was not happened in this town  and around for over four decades. As a result, some sections of roads were washed away by floods while several houses were pulled down. Many people lost their property as some houses were submerged under floodwater. In other places, in one village in Kilimanjaro region, a pastoralist could do nothing but watch helplessly as some of his livestock disappeared during a night. A farmer in Mvomero district of Morogoro region also lost several hectares of maize crop after his farm became waterlogged following heavy rains. Experts said that maize plants cannot survive in pools of water. Several people also lost their lives due to severe flash floods. Agricultural productivity is hardly affected by climate change in Tanzania: soils can no longer support growth of traditional crops. It is forcing people to leave their villages . According to the Ministry for Environment, 61 percent of Tanzania suffer from desertification. “Desertification makes land unsuitable for agriculture and livestock keeping, and Rising sea levels threaten to sink island and saline water has infiltrated freshwater sources, said Sabine Minninger, Climate Change Policy Advisor, Bread for the World. She emphasized: “These have forced members of vulnerable communities to migrate to other areas where they have lost their identity.” Understanding Loss and Damage There are views that the erratic rainy seasons and the high intensity of rainfall are caused by climate change and some negative impacts are now unavoidable. These consequences of human-induced climate change often result in loss and damage.“Loss refers to things that are lost forever and cannot be brought back, such as human lives or species , while damages refer to things that are damaged, but can be repaired or restored, such as roads or embankments, ” explained Saleemul Huq, a senior fellow at the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED). Strengthening flood barriers, planting trees, using new crop varieties and other forms of adaptation...

Read More
Tanzania: Communities are fighting for their rights
Avr08

Tanzania: Communities are fighting for their rights

Tanzania: Communities are fighting for their rights   By Deodatus Mfugale April 8 2017 Issues surrounding disputes over land ownership  are many in Tanzania and in Africa generally. From 2000 to 2010, several violent conflicts in various parts of Tanzania occurred between agribusiness investors and communities. The conflict thus involved three parties, the government, the investor and the local community. The villagers found that the government had colluded with the investor to deny them the right to own land. “The government had given us a raw deal. It was bad enough to sell the farm to the investor when people in the village needed that land. Giving the investor additional land made our situation worse,” said Alex Kyando, a resident of Kapunga village. In 2006 when the Tanzania government decided to privatize the Kapunga Rice Farm located in Mbeya Region ( Southern Highlands) to Export Trading Company, local communities were very disappointed and responded in a violent manner. In Babati District of Manyara Region, communities set on fire Tanzanian investor of Asian origin’s houses, stores, machinery, tractors. His relatives were also killed. The bloody incident was a climax of a long-standing conflict between the two parties: local communities alleging that the investor had unlawfully taken their land and they wanted it back. But the land was sold to the investor for a 100 years lease agreement. The local community originally offered the land to the government to create a state farm. But   the government had failed to manage it. Government Now things are changing and the demand by communities to uphold the right to own land is paying off.  In 2015,  the government declared that it would give back to the community the 1, 875 hectares of land that were sold to the investor of Kapunga Rice Farm which were over and above the original size of the farm. The government declaration became effective last year when the Minister responsible for lands announced that the parcel of land in question had been handed over to Mbarali District Council. “We have revoked the title deed for the land that was not originally part of Kapunga Rice Farm when it was sold to Export Trading Company. The Mbarali District Council will survey the land and give it back to the villagers,” said William Lukuvi, Minister for Lands. Arguments Until January this year, the survey had been completed and the land handed over to Kapunga Village Government for allocation to community members. Although there are complaints from some individuals that the allocation was not done fairly, most of the community members are happy with the government’s decision and the subsequent actions by...

Read More
COP 22- Bangladesh- Energy: Women are game-changers in promoting access to clean energy
Oct23

COP 22- Bangladesh- Energy: Women are game-changers in promoting access to clean energy

  COP 22- Bangladesh- Energy: Women are game-changers in promoting access to clean energy   A group of Tanzanians visited Bangladesh a few weeks  ago to learn about renewable energy initiatives in this country with the aim  to help Tanzania  “achieving 100 percent use of renewable energy”. The Tanzania delegation comprised representatives from the Parliament, the Ministry of Energy and Mineral resources, the civil society and the media.   Report by Deodatus Mfugale Dhaka, Bangladesh Rural women training Modhukhali village in Bangladesh-  Here is Shahana Begama in a classroom, speaking to 20 women. The women are listening deeply. On a table, one can see various components: a solar system, a bulb, a solar panel, a control panel, battery…These tools are used by Mrs Begama during a training. Today, she explains how to use the  Solar Home System ( SHS), a cheap and a simple solar equipment. It provides electricity to poor family. The aim of the training is to assure families that they can have access to energy easily  . The training programme helps also families to used  solar systems. It creates a positive social force in the village as it promotes renewable energies technologies. “By implementing this programme, those women who come from poor, disadvantaged families will be able to contribute to the family income, especially  improving the education and health  of their  their children,” explained Dipal Chandra Barua, Chairman and Founder of GGEF. Over 400 women in rural Bangladesh have been trained in servicing solar systems installed in their homes since 2010. This is thanks to the Bright Green Energy Foundation (BGEF) which strives to provide access to clean energy to poor families in the rural areas. By December last year (2015), four million solar homes systems had been installed while almost 50,000 SHS are being installed in rural homes every month. Women Empowerment Besides repairing and maintaining their own Solar Home System, the women also provide maintenance services to other community members and train other rural women to become “green technicians, according to Mr Barua. “Some women technicians assemble and repair solar accessories: they can earn more than Tk6000 (approximately USD 76) per month. This is not a very big amount of money but it helps rural families to meet their needs,” he said. “We have taken the assembling and repairing of solar accessories to the rural areas at the users’ doorstep and created ‘green’ jobs for rural women while promoting women entrepreneurs of the future,” he added. Strategy Building capacity and helping people having access to energy is really needed and helpful said  trainees. “My children can now study and do their homework at home...

Read More