Mtwara residents allowed to go back home but threat from storm still looms large
Avr25

Mtwara residents allowed to go back home but threat from storm still looms large

  Mtwara residents allowed to go back home but threat from storm still looms large     By Deodatus Mfugale Dar es Salaam Tanzania April 25, 2019   MORE than 5,000 Mtwara town residents who had left their homes early today to avoid the forecasted catastrophic impacts of Tropical Storm Kenneth have been allowed to go back to their homes but stay alert for any signs of the storm gaining momentum. Mtwara regional  authorities had sheltered the residents in six centres as a safety measure against the tropical storm after the Tanzanania Meterological authorities had forecast the storm would make a landfall in Mtwara by noon on Thursday. The weather authority had warned that the storm would lead to heavy floods and destroy various infrastructures, thereby threatening human life. However by 16hrs, about four hours after the   forecast landfall, neither strong winds nor heavy rains were experienced. The Regional Defense and Security Committee thus allowed the residents to go home but warned that they should be alert as the situation could change. The government leaders would keep the public informed of in case of any developments. “The weather has been generally calm contrary to the forecast. By 15hrs the wind speed was 50 kph as opposed to 140kph which the weather authority had forecast. We believe it is safe enough for you to go back home and engage in your daily businesses,” said Mtwara Regional Commissioner Gelacius Byakanwa but was quick to warn the residents to be alert for any changes in the weather. “But it is not yet over! The storm is still there and things might change. So be on the lookout and tune to the news media for any development. We have also arranged for a public address system that will be employed to inform you immediately should any changes happen,” explained the Regional Commissioner. However according to the Director of TMA, Dr Agnes Kijazi, Tropical Storm Kenneth was still active 177 kilometres away from Mtwara, gaining speed from 130kph to 140 kph and heading towards Mozambique. “So things are far from over. The storm is drawing heavy clouds over many areas in the southern part of the country and these areas are likely to get very heavy rain. The public should take precautions as the dangers posed by Tropical Storm Kenneth are still valid,” she said. According t the Director, the storm will make a landfall in Mozambique early Friday morning, about 230 kilometres away from Mtwara with winds blowing at 100kph. “The fact that it is heading to Mozambique does not mean that we are out of danger; the landfall will affect areas about...

Read More
Residents vacate homes as Kenneth slowly lands in Mtwara
Avr25

Residents vacate homes as Kenneth slowly lands in Mtwara

Residents vacate homes as Kenneth slowly lands in Mtwara By Deodatus Mfugale Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Hundreds of Mtwara town residents and its environs have  vacated their homes to relocate to safer places before Tropical Storm Kenneth makes a landfall in Mtwara town in the afternoon today. By 6.00am today, light showers had started falling in the town and its outskirts as the wind also became stronger by the hour. Most of those who moved to safer places have their homes located close to shore, thus most vulnerable to the negative impacts of the tropical storm. The Mtwara Municipal Director Col. Emmanuel Mwaigobeko identified safe areas that people should move to as Mtwara airport,Majengo, and Tandika Primary schools, Naliendele army camp and Mitego and Sabodo secondary schools. “ All schools should remain closed. Employees should not go to work today and all should move to safe areas as directed. Do not take anything with you,” he stressed. Earlier the Tanzanania Meteorological Authority Manager for the Southern Zone Daudi Amasi had identified vulnerable areas from which people should vacate as including, Mikindani, Mtepwezi, Kiyanga, Kiyangu, Chuno, Miseti, Skoya and Rreli all of which are close to the shore. ”These are the areas that will probably be most hit by the storm. People must vacate their homes very early in the morning,” he warned, adding that people in other areas must also move to safe places. The Mtwara regional Commissioner Gelacius Byakanwa also warned  Mtwara residents, particularly fishermen to stay away from the ocean the whole day today until the situation normalized.”This warning also applies to all those who use vessels for purposes other than fishing. Please stay away from the ocean,” the RC warned. A resident of Mtwara town Abdallah Mbangile said in an interview that by 8.00 this morning the wind had started to gain strength and there were light showers.” We are leaving our homes and I am relocating to the airport for safety,” he said. However, not everyone heeded to the warning given by the leaders. “Some people are reluctant to leave their places; maybe they don’t realize the danger that goes with storms,” explained Mbangile. A journalist working for Safari Radio in Mtwara town, Baraka Jamal  said that there were light showers early in the morning and a weak wind. “There was a bit of wind at night but then it died off. Right now (8.15 am) there is a bit of wind, a weak one. Maybe it will pick up soon,” he said. According to the journalist all offices have been closed for today and residents have been seen relocating to places identified by the...

Read More
Tanzania –Natural Resources: “ Communities  must know their rights and obligations”- Report
Avr11

Tanzania –Natural Resources: “ Communities  must know their rights and obligations”- Report

Tanzania –Natural Resources: “ Communities  must know their rights and obligations”- Report   In a recent workshop held in Dar es Salaam ( Tanzania), experts discussed the recent publication  of the FAO Voluntary Guidelines on Responsible Governance Tenure. Feature.   By Deodatus Mfugale in Dar Es Salaam “Inadequate and insecure tenure rights increase vulnerability, hunger and poverty and can lead to conflict and environmental degradation when competing users fight for the control of the resources,”  an  UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), published recently.   The eradication of hunger and poverty, and the sustainable use of the environment, depend to a great extent on how communities gain access to land, fisheries and forests which in turn is regulated by the exiting tenure systems. Tenure systems define and regulate how communities gain access to natural resources, whether through formal law or informal arrangements.   However tenure systems increasingly face stress as the world’s growing population requires food security, and as environmental degradation and climate change reduces the availability of land, fisheries and forests. This has sparked stiff competition for resources among the various users with marginalized communities getting a raw deal. Many developing countries are endowed with abundant natural resources that could be used to improve the lives of their people and boost the economy of the respective countries. Countries with natural resources like forests, land, fisheries and wildlife could be treading with firm steps on the path to sustainable development but are struggling to feed their people most of whom live in abject poverty. Governance failure in ensuring secure tenure and access to natural resources has denied Tanzanian rural communities from benefitting from existing sources of livelihoods. They have thus failed to attain food security and reduce poverty at family level. How to understand the management of natural resources?  In a recent workshop held in Dar es Salaam to discuss the report, Dr Zacharia Ngeleja of Ardhi University said that the Guidelines contribute to achieving sustainable livelihoods, social stability, housing security, rural development, environmental protection and sustainable social and economic development. While the Voluntary Guidelines merely present principles and internationally accepted standards for practices for the responsible governance of tenure, countries can develop their own strategies and other conditions that may ease the application of the Guidelines. During the workshop participants underscored the need to educate communities on laws, policies, rules and procedures governing tenure of land, forests and fisheries so that they understand their rights and obligations. “If they understand the issues then they can demand for tangible benefits from their responsibility to conserve natural resources and only then can Responsible Governance of Tenure come into play. It...

Read More
Sustainable Development: Women in Tanzania are fighting for equal rights
Sep23

Sustainable Development: Women in Tanzania are fighting for equal rights

Sustainable Development: Women in Tanzania  are fighting for equal rights By Deodatus Mfugale     In  Asha Kadgo, a Land Tights Monitor in Uhambingeto Village in Kilolo District of Iringa Region in Tanzania’s Southern Highlands. Land Rights Monitors help to resolve land-based conflicts in their communities, provide paralegal guidance and raise awareness on landrights in their communities.          ...

Read More
COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania
Juil14

COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania

COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania Many people remember the last rainy season in May. It has started unusually late. But it has affected people.There are views that the erratic rainy seasons and the high intensity of rainfall are caused by climate change and some negative impacts are now unavoidable. These consequences of human-induced climate change often result in loss and damage.  Analysis by DeodatusMfugale*.     Dar es Salaam July 14, 2017 Many people lost their property Many people remember the last rainy season in May. It has started unusually late. But it has affected people. Residents of Tanga city, located on the Tanzanian northern coast close to the Kenyan border, were pounded by  heavy downpour recently. It was not happened in this town  and around for over four decades. As a result, some sections of roads were washed away by floods while several houses were pulled down. Many people lost their property as some houses were submerged under floodwater. In other places, in one village in Kilimanjaro region, a pastoralist could do nothing but watch helplessly as some of his livestock disappeared during a night. A farmer in Mvomero district of Morogoro region also lost several hectares of maize crop after his farm became waterlogged following heavy rains. Experts said that maize plants cannot survive in pools of water. Several people also lost their lives due to severe flash floods. Agricultural productivity is hardly affected by climate change in Tanzania: soils can no longer support growth of traditional crops. It is forcing people to leave their villages . According to the Ministry for Environment, 61 percent of Tanzania suffer from desertification. “Desertification makes land unsuitable for agriculture and livestock keeping, and Rising sea levels threaten to sink island and saline water has infiltrated freshwater sources, said Sabine Minninger, Climate Change Policy Advisor, Bread for the World. She emphasized: “These have forced members of vulnerable communities to migrate to other areas where they have lost their identity.” Understanding Loss and Damage There are views that the erratic rainy seasons and the high intensity of rainfall are caused by climate change and some negative impacts are now unavoidable. These consequences of human-induced climate change often result in loss and damage.“Loss refers to things that are lost forever and cannot be brought back, such as human lives or species , while damages refer to things that are damaged, but can be repaired or restored, such as roads or embankments, ” explained Saleemul Huq, a senior fellow at the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED). Strengthening flood barriers, planting trees, using new crop varieties and other forms of adaptation...

Read More