Africities-Monrovia City Mayor: “I am an inspiration for young people”
Nov22

Africities-Monrovia City Mayor: “I am an inspiration for young people”

Africities-Monrovia City Mayor: “I am an inspiration for young people”     Jefferson Koijee, City Mayor of Monrovia ( Liberia) is in Marrakech for Africities Summit. Mayor of Monrovia since February 2018, he  was selected recently by a program of  the European Union as an ambassador of the fight against climate change. His town was selected as one the 13 towns which will be supported financialy by the European Union for projects related to Energy.  As a former activist and a young political leader, he  is also helping the youth in his town to understand the food security challenges and solutions. Listen to the interview. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache       JeffersonKoijee...

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Nigeria- Waste management – The youth should seize the job opportunities
Sep14

Nigeria- Waste management – The youth should seize the job opportunities

Nigeria- Waste management – The youth should seize the job opportunities By Oluwasayo Folarin   Nigeria with a growing population of 189 million people produces an estimated 65 million tonnes of waste yearly, Waste Management Society of Nigeria has revealed. According to the World Bank, with a rapid population growth and urbanisation, municipal waste generation is expected to rise to 2.2 billion tonnes by 2025. In Lagos,   there are  over 10,000 metrics tons of waste generated daily with heaps of waste clogging waterways   which are causing environmental hazards. But there  are enormous opportunities in sustainable waste management in this country although  the jobs in Waste Management have  not been seized by the youth. How it can happen? First, corporate environmental strategies should be explained.  The youth in Nigeria  should know why and  how  corporations engage in environmental strategies. They have to understand what kind of environmental strategies have been  prepared by the country and other countries in Africa and in the world. Recycling, promoting an ecofriendly environment with positive outcome as a  massive income should be explained to the youth in rural and urban areas. In riverine areas in Nigeria, plastic bottles can be used to build canoes and these boats will be sold to fishermen. But again, this action has to be explained. Is it safe or not?  Is it environmental friendly? In India, plastic bottles are taken off there dumpsites and have been  used for  building roads. More than 33,796km of roads have been built in India with post-consumer plastic waste according to the last World Economic Forum. There is no time to waste. Niger, Kano and Nasarawa in central and northern Nigeria have been recently affected by flooding due to climate change and human activities such as clogging of drainage and improper disposal of waste. The social enterprise Wecylers based in Lagos can be a model for Nigerian ‘s youth. This company owned by a young woman from Nigerian’s  Diaspora can help the youth to overcome difficulties and find opportunities in waste management.     Oluwasayo Folarin is a young graduated from the  University of Ibadan, the first university of Nigeria.  He has a keen interest in  Science and Sustainable Development Goals  specially the Climate Action Goal in Nigeria.   He is  currently  working as a Research/Teaching Assistant at Osun State College of Technology, Esa Oke, Osun State, in Nigeria where he is assisting  lecturers on various research projects. He is now also part of Era Environnement to become a journalist. He will cover stories on climate action.  ...

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America promotes Environmental investments in Africa
Juil22

America promotes Environmental investments in Africa

 America promotes Environmental investments in Africa By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) President and Chief Executive Officer Ray W. Washburne visited South Africa this week where he met with local banks to discuss investment opportunities to advance development in the country and highlight OPIC-supported projects. It’s the third stop on a six country trip to promote U.S. investment in the region, strengthen partnerships, and find opportunities to work with regional allies on projects that drive economic growth and stability throughout the region. Infrasalience is creating green jobs Among the projects Washburne visited was OPIC-supported SA Taxi which provides loans to entrepreneurs operating minibuses in South Africa. The minibuses are a key part of the South African transportation sector where approximately 67 percent of all travel in South Africa is on a minibus. Each vehicle is a small business which supports the operators, their families and their communities. Washburne met with a number of innovative American businesses and investors including Infrasalience, a company established by American entrepreneurs. The company has developed mobile green chemical plants which profitably transforms air pollution and waste water into sustainable green chemicals. By establishing a process to recycle and reuse industrial and infrastructure waste while simultaneously creating jobs, the company is helping to bring American ingenuity and business values to emerging markets. Exploring investment opportunities in Africa Washburne is traveling to Africa to explore investment opportunities and to highlight OPIC’s new Connect Africa initiative to invest more than $1 billion in transportation, technology and value chains on the continent. Earlier this month, Washburne earlier traveled to Zambia and Rwanda where he visited American coffee processing facilities and met with heads of state. His travel on the continent will continue to Botswana, Uganda, and Kenya where he will meet with senior government officials and visit OPIC supported projects. Africa is a longstanding priority for OPIC and accounts for about one-quarter of the agency’s $23 billion global portfolio. As part of his National Security Strategy, President Trump highlighted the need for a modernized approach by the U.S. government to development finance to help grow aspiring partners, promote economic relationships, and increase investment in regions important to American interests....

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AFDB: Africa needs to accelerate private sector investment in infrastructure
Juil22

AFDB: Africa needs to accelerate private sector investment in infrastructure

AFDB: Africa needs to accelerate private sector investment in infrastructure By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   The Kenyan Urgent call President Uhuru Kenyatta has made an urgent call for developing and funding bankable infrastructure projects to drive Africa’s growth agenda during the Africa50 General shareholders Meeting held in Nairobi, Kenya. President Kenyatta said support for bankable projects in energy, transport, ICT, water and sanitation provide unprecedented opportunities for private sector participation. “The private sector must step up and help us close the infrastructure gap on the African continent. Public funding is limited, and there are competing priorities,” he said. Kenyatta announced Kenya would double its current shareholding investment in Africa50 to US$ 100 million. “We must have the confidence to trust and invest in our own infrastructure. Let us grow our partnership and make Africa50 a success.” ” A financing gap of US$ $68 – 108 billion” According to statistics provided by the African Development Bank (www.AfDB.org) the continent’s infrastructure funding requirements stand at close to US$ 170 billion a year, leaving a financing gap of US$ $68 – 108 billion. African Development Bank President and Chairman of Africa50, Akinwumi Adesina, said, “We need to act with speed and urgency. Our people expect nothing else.” He emphasized the importance of tackling factors that inhibit private sector infrastructure investments, including high costs of financing, weak regulations,  lack of cost reflective tariffs, low profitability, and weak regulatory frameworks for public-private partnerships. Private sector infrastructure financing in Africa remains low, averaging US$ 6 billion per year. In 2016, the figure dipped to US$ 2.6 billion. Adesina said Africa requires new models of financing infrastructure. “We must work smart to attract greater levels of investment financing for infrastructure development in Africa. Globally, there is approximately a US$ 120 trillion pool of savings and private equity. Africa must creatively attract some of this into the continent,” he said. Africa50 In response to Africa’s infrastructure finance deficit, the African Development Bank has launched the Africa Investment Forum (AIF) set to take place in South Africa in November 2018. The transaction-based forum is expected to be a gathering of global pension funds, sovereign wealth funds and institutional investors, and key private sector players. Adesina commended President Kenyatta for the country’s bold commitment to and investments in infrastructure development over the last 5 years. Infrastructure accounts for 77% of the Bank’s Kenya portfolio. “Mr. President, you were one of the first African leaders to support the creation of Africa50, which I am honored to chair,” said Adesina. “The African Development Bank, of which I am President, helped create Africa50 because we believe new institutional models are needed to close Africa’s...

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World Environment day: ” We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba
Juin05

World Environment day: ” We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba

World Environment day: “We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba*   On World Environment Day, there are plenty of words spoken about the obvious damage being wreaked by climate change – the chaos of hurricanes, wild fires and melting polar ice caps is there for all to see. But there’s another more hidden casualty of this new world of rising temperatures, drought, and increased natural disasters:  the education of our young people. At the simplest level, the wilder weather that we’re already seeing means children are prevented from getting to school. Hurricanes Irma and Harvey meant 1.7 millionUS students were temporarily unable to go to school last year – and officials in Puerto Rico have also recently announced plans to close over 280 schools following the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria. “Climate change is compounding educational inequalities that already exist” In wealthier nations, the damage caused by the increasing occurrence of extreme weather events more often than not tends to cause temporary disruption to children’s education.  But in poorer countries, the consequences can be far more long lasting. Buildings and infrastructure can take months or years to rebuild, with devastating implications for learning. Girls are most likely to be taken out of school in the wake of climate-related shocks, as was found in studies in Pakistan and Uganda after natural disasters there. So, indirectly, climate change is compounding educational inequalities that already exist. But the hardest hit parts of the world are those where universal education is still denied millions and Sub-Saharan Africa is on the front lines. Adult literacyrates are around 65%, compared to a global average of 86%. Here, over a fifth of childrenaged 6-11 are out of school, and a third of those aged 12-14. In Rwanda, we know the devastating impact of being forced from one’s home can have on a child’s education. But the big refugee crises of the future will not just be driven by war, but by the environment, with experts warning tens of millionsare likely to be displaced in the next decade by droughts and crop failures brought about by climate change.  What’s more, rising temperatures are predicted to result in the spread of lethal diseases. It is thought that a 2°C rise in temperatures could lead to an additional 40-60 million people in Africa being exposed to malaria. The disease is already one of the most significant factors in student absenteeism on the continent, with estimates ranging from 13 – 50%depending on the region.  Environmental changes are diminishing children’s education in other ways too. Malnourishmentdirectly affects children’s ability to learn. The World Food Programme has identified hunger and malnutrition as one of the most significant impacts of...

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