New green technology to help Kenya ‘s flowers
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New green technology to help Kenya ‘s flowers

    New green technology to help Kenya ‘s flowers   By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache It is well known Kenya’s roses, carnations and summer flowers, in particular, are renowned for being long-lasting.  Indeed, one terminal at Nairobi airport is dedicated specially to the transport of flowers and vegetables.  Therefore, perishable floral cargo can go from grower to consumer in record time.  Kenya is the third largest exporter of cut flowers in the world and is the undisputed East African floriculture champion. Flower exports have become Kenya’s third major export (after tea and tourism) bringing more than $100m in to the Kenyan economy each year. But nowadays flowers exports is under constant threat of damage by pest and disease due to climate change. ADAS Horticulture, part of UK based RSK Group, has pioneered new technology for reducing the impact of pest and pathogen attacks which cause significant crop and supply chain losses in Kenya. It will help Kenya become a leading exporter of fresh produce, according to the company. ADAS is indeed a trading name of RSK ADAS Ltd. RSK Group in the UK’s largest privately owned multi-diciplinary  environmental consultancy and one of the fastest growing companies of its kind in Europe. With operations in Europe, Africa, Middle East, its comprehensive, solutions-led consultancy services help organisations around the world conduct business in a compliant and environmentally-responsible manner.   Fighting the disease: UV technology The most problematic disease which causes crop and supply chain losses is Botrytis(commonly known as grey mould) but it is not the only problem.  Pests and pathogens are estimated to contribute up to 40% of cut rose yield losses worldwide. Standard chemical control techniques involving direct spray applications of pesticides are not always effective and their use is being constantly challenged by consumer and environmental impact concerns. To address the problem of pestilence and find a sustainable, environmentally friendly solution, ADAS has spent the last three years working  with industry and academic partners to develop new sustainable, non-contact, non-chemical technologies. The project was funded by Innovate UK. Explaining the innovative technology, Dr Barry Mulholland, Director, ADAS Horticulture, said, “We worked with a Kenyan business, which grows and exports roses back to the UK. To him, the technology comprises two strands: firstly, UV light to make crops more resistant to pest and pathogen attack and also improve product marketable quality; and secondly, UV light in post harvest environments to remove ethylene, which is known as the “silent killer” and is responsible for the accelerated ageing of fresh produce.” This is the first time ever that UV technology has been on a crop while it is growing. It has been noted by the company that the resistance goes through the supply chain. How does it work? “By removing ethylene, the ageing process is effectively suspended. By simply extending shelf life by...

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Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa
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Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa

Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa   Some 800 delegates from 59 countries, including ministers and other high-level government and international officials, together with non-state delegates, offered their insights into the challenges and possible responses to climate change, and harvested those insights for consideration in the official international climate negotiation process. Explanation. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache with UNFCCC   The collecting of views – under the banner of the year-long Talanoa Dialogue launched at negotiations in Bonn, Germany, in November 2017 – was a key part of Africa Climate Week that just concluded in Nairobi (Kenya). During this Africa Climate Week, co-organized with the African Development Bank and member of the Nairobi Framework Partnership ( NFP), from 9th to 13th April in Nairobi ( Kenya), some 800 delegates from 59 countries, including ministers and other high level expressed their responses to the threat of climate change, and harvested other insights for consideration in the official international climate negotiations process.  Action on climate change and sustainable development together are the keys for the development of Africa. The Nairobi Framework Partnership (NFP) is celebrating this year its 10th anniversary, as is the Africa Carbon Forum, which was launched by NFP to spur investment in climate action through carbon markets, mechanisms and finance. The NFP members include: the African Development Bank, Asian Development Bank, International Emissions Trading Association, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), UNEP DTU Partnership, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, United Nations Development Programme, UN Climate Change, and World Bank Group. Cooperating organizations include: Africa Low Emission Development Partnership, Climate Markets and Investment Association, Development Bank of Latin America, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, Inter-American Development Bank, Latin American Energy Organization and West African Development Bank. What was their messages exactly? At the first regional Talanoa event since the launch in Bonn, delegates distilled their deliberations into key messages: Finance – Public finance must be instrumental in unlocking private finance Markets – Carbon markets are about doing more together, and doing more with less Energy – Energy is a high priority, affecting everything. Financial instruments should be put in place to de-risk investment and enhance involvement in smaller and medium-sized enterprises Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – Achieving the SDGs, including the climate one is the only way forward Technology – Businesses are ready to pick up new technology solutions, provided there is a good business case. The voice of the private sector is needed now more than ever. “We are engaged across most of the Sustainable Development Goals and clearly focusing on how to create synergy between the different goals and especially with the climate goal, which is...

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COP 23: Climate Finance Insight- ICCG
Oct07

COP 23: Climate Finance Insight- ICCG

COP 23: Climate Finance Insight- ICCG Implementing NDCs in Africa is not so easy especially when countries need finance, technology data collection.  Ahead of COP 23, governments in Africa are waiting for a solution to accelerate this implementation. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Achieving the Paris Agreement goals is not easy, but it needs to bring together all the stakeholders said representatives of governments and institutions in a gathering last spring in Italy .  Representatives of governments and institutions have been interviewed  by Inititiative on Climate Change Policy and Governance, an institute based in Venice. One of their interviewees, was Pacifica  F. Achieng Ogola, Director, Climate Change, Ministry of Environment, Natural Resources & Regional Development of Kenya....

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COP 23: Un aperçu de la finance climatique- ICCG
Oct07

COP 23: Un aperçu de la finance climatique- ICCG

COP 23-Un aperçu de la finance climatique- ICCG   Plusieurs représentants de gouvernements et d’institutions financières ont été interviewés à l’occasion d’une réunion organisée par  le ICCG ,  l’initiative sur les politiques de changement climatique et de gouvernance, un institut basé en Italie.   Explications. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Comment atteindre les objectifs de l’accord de Paris ? Selon Barbara Buchner, la directrice exécutive de l’institut  Climate Policy Initiative, , il doit y avoir un développement massif rapide autant dans l’adaptation que dans la réduction des gaz à effet de serre, afin d’atteindre les objectifs de l’accord de Paris et atteindre les 2 voire 1,5  degrés recommandés par la science.   Si nous ne sommes pas en mesure  de mettre en application sérieusement le premier tour des contributions nationales, nous ne pourrons pas passer au second tour : nous devons ainsi sérieusement travailler ensemble avec le secteur privé, les gouvernements, c’est une importante mission de coordination, explique le Norbert Goriben, le responsable de Climate Finance International. Mais, mettre en application les contributions nationales n’est pas si évident, notamment en Afrique.  “Nous n’avons pas assez de données pour répondre aux exigences en matière d’établissement de rapports liés à l’accord de Paris et nous avons besoin de renforcement de capacités pour développer la collecte de données, les technologies, les ressources humaines et nous avons besoin de financement pour mettre en œuvre ces projets liés aux contributions nationales, indiquent Pacifica F. Achieng Ogola, Directrice du département Changement Climatique du Ministère de l’Environnement, des Ressources Naturelles et du Développement Régional du Kenya. Et de préciser :  ” Les modalités de mise en œuvre de certains éléments des contributions nationales ne sont pas très explicites, nous attendons les conclusions des Conférences des Nations Unies sur le Climat , COP 23,et COP 24. Selon les experts interviewés, le partenariat sur les contributions nationales lancé par le Maroc et l’Allemagne, l’an dernier, ont impulsé le développement et la planification de la finance climatique, mais les avancées sont timides. Le secteur privé peut avoir un rôle important dans l’accélération de l’accès à la finance climatique.  ...

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