Climate Finance : A LDC  side event on National Adaptation Plans
Juin18

Climate Finance : A LDC side event on National Adaptation Plans

Climate Finance : A LDC  side event on National Adaptation Plans By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache On July 11th, the National Adaptation Plan (NAP) Global Network  will organize an interactive side event in Bonn. A wide range of stakeholders will discuss issues around the theme : « Budgeting for Implementation of NAPs ». It will be held during the National Adaptation Plans Expo which is conducted annually by the Least Developed Countries ( LDCs) Group.  The National Adaptation Plan Expo is indeed a forum for developing countries to advance the process to formulate and implement National Adaptation Plans. The National Adaptation Plans Global Network is a coordinator of bilateral support and an international facilitator.  The Least Developed Countries Group  includes 48 countries with 34 african...

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Bonn: End of the third step towards the COP 22
Mai29

Bonn: End of the third step towards the COP 22

  Bonn: End of the third step towards the COP 22 By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache The two weeks  UN climate Change meeting held in Bonn since governments adopted the landmark Paris Agreement closed last thursday. Ahead of the COP 22, countries push ahead with the willing to implement stronger climate action and to construct the global climate regime “rule book” in order to guarantee the treaty’s fairness, transparency and balance between nations, according to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change secretariat. These weeks focused on several key issues : the implementation of Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and the role of finance, transparency ( the role of civil society…), the role of science, capacity building and technology cooperation linked to issues such as loss and damage, and the role of gender  and youth in climate change. National Determined Contributions To the point of scientits,if all countries fully implemented their pledges global temperatures would increase by an estimated 2.7°C by the end of this century. 2.7°C is only met with a 50% chance and temperature would continue to rise after 2100. This is much better than before the Paris process, but still far away from “well below” 2°C, let alone 1.5°C. When parties sign and ratify the agreement, their INDCs become commitments (NDCs). The Paris agreement establishes the principle that over 188 climate action plans provide a firm floor and foundation for higher ambition. Countries will submit updated nationally determined contributions (NDCs) every five years, thereby steadily increasing their ambition in the long-term. Several key issues are raised in the Paris agreement: mitigation; adaptation; loss and damage; a transparency system and global stock-take to account for climate action; and means of implementation, including finance, for nations to build clean, resilient futures. To the point of experts who attended a side event in April in Addis Ababa, in parallele of the African Development Week, there is a potential for the Paris agreement to create the conditions for the mobilization of finance for the implementation of African countries aspects mentioned in the INDCs which cannot be financed from domestic resources. For such potential to be realized, the Paris agreement should develop a mechanism for quantifying the requirements of Least Developed Countries’s INDCs. It can therefore build through the capitalization of the Green Climate Fund. Climate Finance In the absence of any viable mesures to support developed countries, the Green Climate Fund may be the only mechanism to ensure that the Least Developed countries’s Nationally Determined Contributions may be enable to embark on low carbon climate resilient development pathways, said the experts during the Addis Ababa side event.  However, concerns are raised regarding the...

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