COP22- Paris agreement and Human Rights
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COP22- Paris agreement and Human Rights

COP 22-Paris agreement and Human Rights   After the Kyoto Protocol which was not respected by most of the countries, Paris Agreement should be the world’s biggest upswing in Climate change policy. But will it be easy for Human Rights to be at the forefront of the talks in Marrakesh?   By Aya Kathir   The Agreement Paris agreement is a critical turning point toward a zero-carbon and resilient world according to the French presidency of the COP 21, the  UN Climate Change  summit held last December in Paris . The next UN Climate Change conference will be a space of  action, said the Morrocan presidency. After the Kyoto Protocol which was not respected by most of the countries, Paris Agreement should be the world’s biggest upswing in Climate change policy. This agreement was adopted in Paris during the  21 UN Conference on climate change. On 22 April 2016, the text was opened for signature. It was during the Earth Day in New York city. Early August 2016, 180 members of the United Nations Framework Convention on climate Change (UNFCCC) have signed it.  Now,  around 23 States have  deposited their instruments of ratification, acceptance or approval accounting in total for 1.08 % of the total global greenhouse gas emissions, describes  the UNFCCC website. So, it is only representing  around 1.08 % of the total global greenhouse gas emissions. It’s not a working base. But certainly, Paris Agreement was  a “historic turning point” as it was mentioned by Laurent Fabius, the Head of Paris Conference and France’s foreign minister. This agreement aims to reduce the global warming by controlling the Co2 emissions and diminishes greenhouse gas, as it was described in details in Article 2 of the UN Climate Change Convention. It sets ambitious goal: ” to increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°c pre- industrial levels”.   Criticism The agreement  was praised by the French President François Hollande , with the UN secretary general Ban Ki – Moon, and the Climate Change UN Executive  Secretary at  that time, Christina Figueres. Although,  it was surrounded by criticism. “The agreement is all about “promises” and we don’t see its impact in real life”, said James Hansen, a former NASA scientist and Climate change expert. Specially after the limited participation in the Kyoto Protocol and the lack of agreement in Copenhagen in 2009. But   the Kyoto Protocol did not include a single reference to  the rights of indigenous people and ecosystem integrity. As opposed to the Kyoto Protocol, Human Rights  are include in the Paris Agreement,  not in the body of the text, but it is  included  in the...

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