UNFCCC: A new gate for the Talanoa Dialogue
Jan27

UNFCCC: A new gate for the Talanoa Dialogue

UNFCCC: A new gate for the Talanoa Dialogue The UN Climate Change secretariat launched yesterday a new portal to support the Talanoa Diaologue, an important international conversation in which countries will check progress and seek to increase global ambition to meet the goals of the Paris Climate Change Agreement. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   How will it work? Through the portal, all countries and other stakeholders, including business, investors, cities, regions and civil society, are invited to make submissions into the Talanoa Dialogue around three central questions: Where are we? Where do we want to go? How do we get there? Countries and non-Party stakeholders will be contributing ideas, recommendations and information that can assist the world in taking climate action to the next level in order to meet the objectives of the Paris Agreement and support the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The Talanoa Dialogue The Dialogue was launched at the UN Climate Change Conference COP23 in Bonn in November 2017 and will run throughout 2018. The Paris Agreement’s central goal is keep the global average temperature rise to below 2C degrees and as close as possible to 1.5C. Current global ambition to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to prepare societies to resist increasing climate change is not enough to achieve this under the current national climate action plans known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs). “The portal is the gateway for the Talanoa Dialogue. It represents the central point for everyone to make their views heard around enhanced ambition. Additionally, it will make available other key resources for the dialogue,” said Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change. “I very much welcome the portal because it provides transparency and broadens participation in the dialogue. I look forward to many governments and other actors making their submissions via the portal as part of world-wide efforts required for the next level of climate action and ambition”, she said. The Pacific island concept of ‘Talanoa’ was introduced by Fiji, which held the Presidency of the COP23 UN Climate Change Conference. It aims at an inclusive, participatory and transparent dialogue. The purpose of the concept is to share stories, build empathy and to make wise decisions for the collective good. The Talanoa method purposely avoids blame and criticism to create a safe space for the exchange of ideas and collective decision-making. The Talanoa Dialogue will be constructive, facilitative and oriented towards providing solutions and will see both technical and political exchanges....

Read More
COP 23 : Angola is combating Coal with 19 nations
Nov18

COP 23 : Angola is combating Coal with 19 nations

COP 23 : Angola is combating Coal with 19 nations Following the High level Segment, held this Wednesday, Angola shows its interest to combat coal with an Alliance of 19 nations.  Demonstration. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   On  Thursday, Angola with other Nations such as the UK, Canada, Costa Rica, France, Belgium,  France, Italy, Marshall Islands, Portugal, el Salvador, US and Canadian states  (Washington, Alberta…). pledged to commit to moving the world from burning coal to cleaner power sources, through the Powering Past Coal Alliance plans. The ambition of this Alliance is to lead the rest of the world in committing to an end to use coal poser. They are going to take action such as setting coal phase out targets, committing to not further investments in coal-fired electricity in their jurisdictions or abroad. The minister of Environment Paula Francisco, head of the delegation of Angola has explained, on Wednesday during the high level segment  at UN Climate Conference in Bonn, how the Angola is engaged in the process of adopting a National Climate Action Plan from 2018 to 2030. Its ambitions: contributing to poverty eradication with a low carbon development strategy. Angola said its willing to implement the Paris Agreement collectively. “ As we progress toward 2020, it is imperative that we take stock of the actions we have collectively taken in accordance with the decisions and commitments made, ” she said during the high level Segment at the UN Climate Change Conference. Mrs Francisco  raised concerns on the large gap between the levels of ambition needed to reach the long term temperature goal of limiting temperature rise to 1,5°Celsius above pre industrial levels and said that the action should be taken collectively and not individually. “While we are encouraged by the fact that 170 Parties have ratified the Paris Agreement, ratification alone will not bridge the gap. Further gaps exist in the level of financial flows and access to technology to developing countries, as our ability to act is limited by access to adequate means of implementation,” she emphasized.    ...

Read More
COP 23 : A half victory for developing countries
Nov18

COP 23 : A half victory for developing countries

COP 23 : A half victory for  developing countries   The Un Climate Change negotiations ended at nearly 7 o’clock this morning with a song from the Fijians.  Started two weeks ago, these negotiations make time to find any compromise between developed and developing countries. As usual. The story. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   The implementation of the Paris Agreement have many issues: adaptation and mitigation through the NDCs, loss and damage,   adaptation,  adaptation fund, finance, transfer of technology, transparency, support and capacity building. Most of all these elements have been taken separately through a facilitative dialogue launched during COP 21 in Paris and pursued in Marrakech during COP 22, then in Bonn with the Fiji presidency, and  the Talanoa Dialogue, a conversation between north and south representatives to achieve the long term pathway to 1,5°Celsius.   The Talanoa Dialogue “ We have been doing the job that we were given to do: advance the implementation guidelines of the Paris Agreement, and prepare for more ambitions actions for the Talanoa dialogue in 2018,” said the  Prime minister of Fiji and president of COP 23, Frank Bainimarama. For the Prime Minister of Fiji, there has been a positive momentum in various areas in COP 23 : the global community has embraced the Fiji  concept of grand coalition for greater ambition linking national governments, states and cities, civil society, the private sector and all women around the world.“ We have  launched a global partnership  to provide millions of climate vulnerable people an affordable access to insurance,” said the president of COP 23. For him, this COP has  put people first. It has connected the people who are not experts on climate change to the UN Climate  negotiations. According to him, putting people first showed to the world that these people are facing climate change in their daily lives. What has been achieved? Saturday, 2.40 Am, the African negotiators left again the negotiations rooms and were happy:   “ We got it Adaptation Fund and Article 9.5,” said Ambassador Nafo from Mali and head of the African group of negotiators. The decisions adopted in Bonn explained that there will be modalities for the accounting of financial resources provided and mobilized through public intervention in accordance to the article 9 of the Paris Agreement. The Article 9.5 of the Paris Agreement has mentionned that the Developed country Parties shall biennially communicate indicative quantitative and qualitative information related to finance of both mitigation and adaptation. Back and Forth Last night was marked by Back and Forth from all the delegates. And it continued earlier  this morning.  At 3am, the Republic of Ecuador on behalf of the G77+...

Read More
COP 23: Commission Sahel- ” Nous partageons les mêmes défis”- Issifi Boureima
Nov16

COP 23: Commission Sahel- ” Nous partageons les mêmes défis”- Issifi Boureima

COP 23: Commission Sahel- ” Nous partageons les mêmes défis”- Issifi Boureima En marge des travaux de la 23ème Conférence des Nations Unies sur les Changements Climatiques, Issifi Boureima,  le conseiller technique du président du Niger en charge du Climat,  et président du groupe de travail conjoint des experts pour la Commission Climat pour la région du Sahel se confie à Era Environnement, dans un entretien fleuve, sur les enjeux de la Commission Sahel et ses solutions pour le développement de l’Afrique. Interview. Propos recueillis par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Era Environnement: La Commission Sahel a été annoncée en marge de la COP 23, un an après cette annonce, quelles sont les actions entreprises et quel bilan faîtes-vous de vos actions ? Issifi Boureima: La commission a été effectivement lancée en marge de la COP 22,  lors du Sommet de Haut Niveau organisé par le roi du Maroc. Pendant ce sommet une  décision importante a été prise: la création de trois commissions dont la Commission Sahel présidée par le Niger, la Commission du bassin du Congo, dirigée par la présidence de la République du Congo et la Commission des Petits Etats Insulaires en Développement dont la présidence est tenue par le Seychelles. Depuis la COP 22, la Commission Sahel  a mis en place une équipe d’experts autour du ministre de l’environnement de notre pays. Après cette action  nationale, un certain nombre de documents ont été préparés et  envoyés aux différents pays des trois Commissions.   Pour la Commission Sahel, notre premier travail consistait donc à à identifier les pays  membres de cette Commission. Sur le plan climatique, le sahel se définit par le principal indicateur qui est la isohyète (la courbe joignant les points recevant la même quantité de précipitations)   et  se caractérise par une pluviométrie allant de  150 millimètres  à 600 millimètres. Nous avons ainsi défini un espace allant de la Gambie à la corne de l’Afrique. La commission Sahel est composée par  17 pays dont l’Ethiopie, l’Erythrée, Djibouti et aussi  le Cap vert qui se retrouve également dans la Commission des Petits Etats Insulaires en Développement. Le Cap Vert est en fait le 18 ème pays.  Nous avons aussi intégré  le Cameroun : sa pointe nord est au Sahel et  il y  a certains défis que nous partageons avec ce pays notamment la sauvegarde du bassin du lac Tchad. Nous voulons  créer de bonnes conditions de travail à travers  la  synergie entre les trois commissions. Le Cap vert et le Cameroun sont les pays qui peuvent faire l’interface entre les différentes Commissions. La Commission Sahel est-elle donc opérationnelle ? Pour le moment, nous  sommes en phase de préparation. Nous avons préparé deux documents importants sous...

Read More
COP 23: Au fond de l’eau
Nov16

COP 23: Au fond de l’eau

COP 23: Au fond de l’eau   La conférence des Nations Unies sur les Changements  Climatiques présidée par les îles Fidji se poursuit. Les demandes restent les mêmes et sont discutées à travers le Dialogue  de Talanoa ( terme signifiant conversation) initié par les îles Fidji et organisé par des consultations informelles, alors que les chefs d’Etats et de gouvernement  s’expriment à Bonn. Résumé des travaux. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Ce que pensent  les îles Fidji Face au dialogue de Talanoa toujours en cours, les îles Fidji, premier Etat insulaire à présider la conférence des Nations Unies sur les Changements climatiques  reste positives. Mais, elles ont rappelé que  la question de la finance et le rôle du fonds d’adaptation font  l’objet de 12 articles à l’ordre du jour des  travaux de la mise en œuvre de l’Accord de Paris. «  Nous, en tant que présidence des Fidji, exprimons notre intérêt spécial de voir comment le fonds d’adaptation va servir l’Accord de Paris et des dialogues sont en cours sur le financement des 100 milliards de dollars par an ( à partir de 2020), a déclaré lors d’une conférence de presse Nazhat Shameem Khan, l’ambassadeur des Fidji auprès des Nations Unies. Le président de la COP 23, le premier ministre Frank Bainimarama,  à quant à lui souligné que  l’Allemagne a  annoncé, à l’ouverture de la COP,  un financement de 50 millions d’euros à destination du fonds d’adaptation pour les pays les moins avancés. Quel est la position de l’Union Européenne? Cette semaine, l’Union Européenne se donne trois objectifs à atteindre  : accomplir les progrès sur l’atténuation, centrés les points mandatés du programme de travail de l’Accord de Paris et maintenir l’équilibre imprimés à l’accord. Mais quelles ont été les demandes de la société civile? A l’ouverture des négociations sur le climat, la société civile, au nom d’un groupe d’ONGs,  Third World Network, s’est manifestée lors de plusieurs conférences de presse pour une prise en compte des actions pré-2020  dans le cadre du protocole de Kyoto mis en application il y a vingt ans mais non ratifié par de nombreux pays dont les Etats-Unis d’Amérique. « On ne peut parler des actions post-2020, sans traiter des actions pré-2020 » à déclaré Mohammed Ado, de Christian Aids. Mardi, le Réseau Climat et Développement, représenté par Aissatou Diouf a exprimé ses inquiétudes face au déséquilibre des contributions nationales africaines. « La plupart des pays africains ont mis l’accent sur l’atténuation dans leur Contribution Prévue Déterminée Nationale, le volet adaptation ne doit pas être occulté : Il y a des soucis sur le financement aussi bien pour le fonds d’adaptation que pour le fonds vert. Le WWF international, quant à...

Read More