Pollution: Big challenges for  delegates attending  UNEA conference in Kenya
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Pollution: Big challenges for delegates attending  UNEA conference in Kenya

  Pollution: Big challenges for delegates attending  UNEA conference in Kenya By Duncan Mboyah   Kenya hosts  over 7,000 delegates who  attend the United Nations Environmental; Assembly (UNEA), according to Kenyan official. Prof. Judi Wakhungu, the Cabinet Secretary for Environment and Natural Resources said that heads of states and government, 100 ministers, environmental scientists, UN agencies, members of the civil society and private sector are attending the conference that takes place from December 4th – 6th. “Governments around the world are looking up to United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP) to monitor and review and establish environmental challenges including pollution,” the CS said during a media briefing. Prof. Wakhungu said that Kenya is committed to supporting the work of the United Nations and desires to maintain Nairobi’s position as the central hub of the UNEP. UNEA is the world’s highest level decision making body on environment and it meets biannually in Nairobi. The last meeting was held in Nairobi in 2015. UNEA has a universal membership of all 193 UN Member States and enjoys the full involvement of UN organizations, specialized agencies, inter-governmental organizations, civil society and the private sector. The Assembly provides a platform for leadership on global environmental policy and aims at delivering a number of tangible commitments to end pollution of air, land, waterways, oceans, and to safely manage our chemicals and waste. Under this year’s theme of ‘Towards a free pollution planet’, delegates will deliver a policy declaration on pollution, linked to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), to signal that humanity can work together to eliminate the threat of pollution and the destruction of our planet. “We have instituted and implemented a wide range of policy and regulatory measures towards eradicating pollution on air, land, water and marine,” she noted. Kenyan is expected to showcase to the world how it has managed to implement the recent ban on use of plastic bags. About Duncan Mboya Duncan Mboyah  is a  Kenyan citizen who specializes in science journalism – health, environment, agriculture and sustainable socioeconomic development. He is currently working with Xinhua News Agency in Nairobi covering science and climate change. Duncan has over 15 years of journalism practice and has written hundreds of articles on climate change effects in Kenya and Africa in general in the past years. He also regularly contributes articles to Scidev net, a British owned online science publication that specializes on science and technology development in the developing world. He has a Degree – Bachelor of Science in Communication and Journalism from Moi University and is currently a Communication’s Studies Masters student at Moi University, Kenya. Duncan also works as a media consultant...

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Climate information prize launched in Kenya
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Climate information prize launched in Kenya

 Climate information prize launched in Kenya By Duncan Mboyah   A climate information prize, The Tekeleza Prize worth USD$ 200,000,  has been launched by the Climate Information Prize programme  to incentivize the development of innovative solutions and to help vulnerable communities to be better informed. Explanations.   Bridging the Gap A climate information prize, The Tekeleza Prize worth USD$ 200,000,  has been launched recently in Kenya to make climate change information more usable and accessible for vulnerable communities and to incentivize the development of innovative solutions. The winning organizations will help vulnerable communities  having access to the information they require. It will  enable them to tackle climate uncertainty and risk. To quote  Assistant Director of the Kenya Meteorology Department, David Gikungu, “The organizations [ Winners]   will be getting valid information from the Kenya Meteorology Department (KMD) and disseminate to consumers for free in helping create awareness.” “Since climate change has adverse effects on individuals and communities, especially those whose livelihood are dependent on weather,  better access and usability of products and services are needed”, explained Gikungu. He observed that there is a lot of information on climate change but unfortunately they are not in formats that communities are able to understand and use.“We have to use climate information to develop initiatives that help the vulnerable adapt to climate variability and change,” he pointed out . The meteorologist said that the gap between producers and users of climate has existed for a long time due to the way the information was packaged and the language used. “The department has devolved its services to all regions in the country and has set up radio stations broadcasting in vernacular languages with the aim of informing farmers, pastoralists and other users in far flung parts of the country,” he added. The means Nicki Spence, the Climate Information Prize manager said that climate change has caused massive sufferings to many people globally hence the need to encourage innovators develop new ideas of tackling it. “The winning organizations will listen and respond to local needs of different groups within their locality by availing easily understood information,” Spence said. For him, Kenya is the best country globally to carry the program due to the government’s commitment to help and also the level of knowledge on climate change in the country. CARE International Kenya’s leader for Adaptation Fiona Percy observed that given the adverse effects of climate change, experts and organizations need to start translating information in a language they understand and not foreign languages. “We must begin to ask ourselves who are the consumers of climate change information and what  is the medium they prefer...

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