Fighting climate change in Liberia
Jan25

Fighting climate change in Liberia

A few months after COP 23 and a few days after the  inauguration of the new President of Liberia, George Weah, Era Environnement shares with you the interview of the National Coordinator of the Green Climate Fund in Liberia, Jeremiah G. Sokan. This interview took place in Bonn, Germany during COP 23 by Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache.             Introduction to Jeremiah G. Sokan and his view on climate finance during COP 23       JeremiahSokanLiberia His view on the US position on the Paris Agreement and the consequences for the implementation of the Paris Accord.       JeremiahSokanLiberia2 What can be the role of the African Presidents for the implementation of the Paris Agreement? How about Liberia and its climate change policy toward the youth?...

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Climate Finance: the key to develop the South
Déc31

Climate Finance: the key to develop the South

Climate Finance: the key to develop the South As we approach the year 2018, our thanks go to our readers who follow us for about two years. This adventure is not so easy but we overcome challenges everyday. Thank you for your unwavering support. From today to the end of January, Era Environnement will publish original and insightful  stories on countries such as Niger, Nigeria, Liberia, South Africa, Comoros, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Senegal and many more. Era Environnement will focus on the COP 23, the One Planet Summit, and especially on the climate finance. Even if there is no definition of the climate finance, which is important for the development of the southern hemisphere. But something seems to change:   a balance is possible between the Northern hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere. The more climate finance includes the sustainable investment, the more  developed countries express interest in encouraging the access to climate finance to countries from the South. Therefore, climate action is the key. The major pillar is renewable energy and the mechanism to help reduce the greenhouse gas emission. Example: the carbon pricing. Ethiopia and Nigeria, two countries from Africa are using this mechanism as a strategy to develop renewable energy in their countries. For many experts,  2018 will be a productive year for the entire continent where all the 54 african countries  will have to reinforce the implementation of their sustainable development program. 2018 will be a year where the african population might also see adaptation to climate change as a key for sustainable development and a key for investors, as we might see for the first time, adaptation associated with profit and sustainable investment. Era Environnement will follow for you these topics. Best wishes 2018. Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Founder and Editor in chief of  www.eraenvironnement.com  ...

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One Planet Summit : South Africa willing to lead the climate finance mobilization with youth
Déc16

One Planet Summit : South Africa willing to lead the climate finance mobilization with youth

One Planet Summit : South Africa willing to lead the climate finance mobilization with youth   On the Sideline of the One Planet Summit which aimed to mobilize all kind of actors who want to follow the Paris Agreement, beside the willing of the United States of America to withdraw from the Paris Accord, , Phakamile Mainganya, chief Risk Officer of the Industrial Development Corporation, gave his view on the integration of the youth in the private sector related to the adaptation to climate change.   Established in 1940 and owned by the government of South Africa, Industrial Development Corporation is a national development finance institution aims to promote economic growth and industrial development. It aims to be the primary source of commercially sustainable industrial development and innovation to benefit both South Africa and the rest of Africa. IDC promote also entrepreneurship.   Who is Phakamile Mainganya? Phakhamile Mainganya is the Chief Risk officer at the Industrial Development Corporation. His responsabilities include helping to define set and manage the risk universe and profile of the corporation. He has extensive experience in the area of credit risk, risk assurance, and executive leadership particularly in the financial services environment.   Houmi Ahamed-Mikidach interviewed him....

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COP 23 : A half victory for developing countries
Nov18

COP 23 : A half victory for developing countries

COP 23 : A half victory for  developing countries   The Un Climate Change negotiations ended at nearly 7 o’clock this morning with a song from the Fijians.  Started two weeks ago, these negotiations make time to find any compromise between developed and developing countries. As usual. The story. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   The implementation of the Paris Agreement have many issues: adaptation and mitigation through the NDCs, loss and damage,   adaptation,  adaptation fund, finance, transfer of technology, transparency, support and capacity building. Most of all these elements have been taken separately through a facilitative dialogue launched during COP 21 in Paris and pursued in Marrakech during COP 22, then in Bonn with the Fiji presidency, and  the Talanoa Dialogue, a conversation between north and south representatives to achieve the long term pathway to 1,5°Celsius.   The Talanoa Dialogue “ We have been doing the job that we were given to do: advance the implementation guidelines of the Paris Agreement, and prepare for more ambitions actions for the Talanoa dialogue in 2018,” said the  Prime minister of Fiji and president of COP 23, Frank Bainimarama. For the Prime Minister of Fiji, there has been a positive momentum in various areas in COP 23 : the global community has embraced the Fiji  concept of grand coalition for greater ambition linking national governments, states and cities, civil society, the private sector and all women around the world.“ We have  launched a global partnership  to provide millions of climate vulnerable people an affordable access to insurance,” said the president of COP 23. For him, this COP has  put people first. It has connected the people who are not experts on climate change to the UN Climate  negotiations. According to him, putting people first showed to the world that these people are facing climate change in their daily lives. What has been achieved? Saturday, 2.40 Am, the African negotiators left again the negotiations rooms and were happy:   “ We got it Adaptation Fund and Article 9.5,” said Ambassador Nafo from Mali and head of the African group of negotiators. The decisions adopted in Bonn explained that there will be modalities for the accounting of financial resources provided and mobilized through public intervention in accordance to the article 9 of the Paris Agreement. The Article 9.5 of the Paris Agreement has mentionned that the Developed country Parties shall biennially communicate indicative quantitative and qualitative information related to finance of both mitigation and adaptation. Back and Forth Last night was marked by Back and Forth from all the delegates. And it continued earlier  this morning.  At 3am, the Republic of Ecuador on behalf of the G77+...

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COP 23: “no time to waste”
Nov07

COP 23: “no time to waste”

 The 2017 UN Climate Change Conference opened on Monday, with the aim of launching nations towards the next level of ambition needed to tackle global warming and put the world on a safer and more prosperous development path, recalled the UNFCCC Secretariat at the opening ceremony. Explanations. By Houmi AHAMED-MIKIDACHE in Bonn   Two years after the adoption of the Paris Climate Change Agreement, this conference held in Bonn and presided by Fiji, the first small island developing state to have this role. “The human suffering caused by intensifying hurricanes, wildfires, droughts, floods and threats to food security caused by climate change means there is no time to waste,” said Mr Frank Bainimarama, the Prime Minister of Fiji and president of COP 23. Critical According to the World Meteorological Organization, 2017 will be one of the three hottest years on records with many high-impact events including catastrophic hurricanes and floods, debilating heatwaves and drought. “The past three years have all been in the top three years in terms of temperature records. This is part of a long term warming trend,” said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas. And he added:  “We have witnessed extraordinary weather, including temperatures topping 50 degrees Celsius in Asia, record-breaking hurricanes in rapid succession in the Caribbean and Atlantic reaching as far as Ireland, devastating monsoon flooding affecting many millions of people and a relentless drought in East Africa. One of the consequences of climate change is food insecurity in developing countries especially. A review of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) found that, in developing countries, agriculture (crops, livestock, fisheries, aquaculture and forestry) accounted for 26% of all the damage and loss associated with medium to large-scale storms, floods and drought. For Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change, it is urgent to act. “The thermometer of risk is rising; the pulse of the planet is racing; people are hurting; the window of opportunity is closing and we must go Further and Faster Together to lift ambition and action to the next defining level, “she said. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the global health impacts of heatwaves depend not only on the overall warming trend, but on how heatwaves are distributed across where people live. Recent research shows that the overall risk of heat-related illness or death has climbed steadily since 1980, with around 30% of the world’s population now living in climatic conditions that deliver prolonged extreme heatwaves. Between 2000 and 2016, the number of vulnerable people exposed to heatwave events has increased by approximately 125 million. The negotiations According to UNFCCC secretariat, COP23 negotiators are keen to move forward on other...

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