Why man should care about the environment
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Why man should care about the environment

Why man should care about the environment By Olumide Idowu* A clean environment is essential for healthy living The more you don’t care about the environment, the more it will become polluted with contaminants and toxins that have a harmful impact on our health. Air pollution can cause respiratory diseases and cancer, among other problems. Water pollution can lead to typhoid, diarrheal diseases, and other ailments. The local authorities have to promote caring for the environment. Earth is warming For the sake of our children and our future, we must do more to combat climate change, adapt to its impact and mitigate its effects. Children yet unborn will appreciate it There is the need to look ahead into the future, there must be a realisation of the fact that there are attendant consequences if we waste and destroy natural resources, and unsustainably exhaust the land – instead of using it in a way that will increase its usefulness. So it is our duty to leave the Earth in a better state that we met for the unborn generation. Biodiversity is key Biological diversity or biodiversity refers to the variety of plants, animals, and other living things in our world. It can be negatively influenced by habitat loss and degradation due to human activity, climate change, and pollution, among other things. Planet earth is our home Until when technology makes it possible for human being to permanently reside in space or any other planet, the Earth for now is our home – it is where we live, so we had better take good care of it. For sure, we would be doing our world and ourselves a lot of good if we do the simplest things in our home or wherever we find ourselves to make this a reality. What can we do? The problems we are facing now are tough. However, the good news is that, you don’t have to be an expert or a millionaire to save the Planet – everyone can help to do their bit for the environment. In other words, if each of us can be more conscious of environmental issues and willing to take some simple steps to save the Planet, we can make a huge difference. Nowadays, with increasing environmental awareness among the public, people around the world are coming together to fight for a greener future, and the effort has been yielding great results. As a pioneering member of environmental advocacy community, Better World International, is always committed to improve and take care of our immediate environment, by providing practical tips to its members on the things they can do to live...

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New York Climate Week: “We need to recognize the urgency we face”- Patricia Espinosa
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New York Climate Week: “We need to recognize the urgency we face”- Patricia Espinosa

New York Climate Week: “We need to recognize the urgency we face”- Patricia Espinosa At the opening ceremony of New York Climate Week on monday 24th, the Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change, Patricia Espinosa, called for more urgency in taking climate action and stressed the need for leadership and a committed multilateral response. Her address   Seventhy-three years ago, nations—ravaged by war, weary of its costs—pledged to achieve what had, for the first half of the century, been impossible: a lasting peace. The signing of the UN Charter in San Francisco was more than an agreement to get along. It established a rules-based international order, championed multilateralism over self-interest, and clarified that the path forward was not through conflict but collaboration.We bear the fruit of that work. Today, many are healthier, better educated, and more peaceful than at any point in history.ut humanity faces a new challenge; one that threatens current and future generations. The Paris Agreement Climate change is an opponent we shaped with our own hands, but whose power now threatens to overwhelm us. Throughout the world, extreme heatwaves, wildfires, storms and floods are leaving a trail of devastation and death.Developing countries suffer the worst, but climate change affects all nations—directly and indirectly. It’s a challenge that a rules-based international order is custom-designed to address—which led to the Paris Agreement. Like the UN Charter itself, its signing was an unprecedented multilateral success. But nations are not living up to what they promised. Under it, nations agreed to limit climate change to 2-degrees Celsius—ideally 1.5C. These targets are the bare minimum to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. But what nations have currently pledged under Paris will bring the global temperature up about 3C by 2100. Let us be clear: low ambition leads to a future where humanity no longer controls its own fate—runaway climate change does. Recent negotiations in Bangkok on the Paris Agreement’s implementation guidelines made some progress, but not enough. Recognizing the urgency We must therefore work harder than ever between now and COP24 to complete this work. We need to see leadership, we need to recognize the urgency we face, and we need to make a commitment to a decisive multilateral response. We have no other option. This means that we must listen to the voices of billions who understand that time itself is a dwindling resource when it comes to climate change. We must listen also to those who understand that addressing climate change provides extraordinary opportunity and are acting. Just as 73 years ago the UN Charter was signed in San Francisco and then moved to New York City……we’ve also just arrived from...

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Nigeria-climate action : “We can all make a difference to climate change”- Olumide Idowu* 
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Nigeria-climate action : “We can all make a difference to climate change”- Olumide Idowu* 

Nigeria-climate action : “We can all make a difference to climate change”- Olumide Idowu*   Column   Changing our lifestyle It is easy to get disheartened or fearful about climate change. Climate change in Nigeria is principally a major problem caused by the increase of human activities if you like, call it human mismanagement of the earth leading to several direct and indirect impacts on health. These climatic changes have wide-range harmful effects including increase in heat-related mortality, dehydration, spread of infectious diseases, malnutrition, damage to public health infrastructure. If we continue as we are now, the effects of global warming around the world could be catastrophic. Some aspects of climate change may already be irreversible. Yet many scientists believe that by taking positive action now, it is possible to slow the pace of climate change and reduce further global warming. Changing our lifestyle and our behaviour will help reduce the human impact on the environment. We can all make a difference to climate change. Here are some suggestions for a healthier, more sustainable approach to living in our environment in Nigeria. Reduce Car Emissions: Leave the car in the garage and walk or cycle for short trips; Use public transport; Keep your car tyres inflated to the recommended pressure; Drive slowly and smoothly; Car-pool with workmates.   Reduce Energy Expenditure in your Home: Turn off lights and appliances when not in use; Replace regular light bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs; Insulate your home and reduce your heating and cooling bills; Install a water-saving showerhead and take shorter showers; Dry your clothes outside on the line rather than in the clothes dryer; Switch to ‘green energy’ for your electricity needs.   Reduce your ‘Carbon Footprint’ When you Shop: Buy local and seasonal food produce to reduce energy use in transport and storage; Buy items with minimal packaging whenever possible; If you buy new items, make sure they are made from sustainable, low-impact materials; Buy secondhand rather than new – from op shops, garage sales or over the Internet.   Recycle Waste and Reuse Pre-Loved Items: Recycle as much of your rubbish as you can; Compost vegetable scraps; ‘Detox your home’ – dispose of unwanted chemicals safely rather than pouring them down the sink or putting them in the rubbish bin; Be creative in finding new uses for ‘found’ or pre-loved objects.   Longer term choices that help the Environment: Buy energy efficient household appliances; Install a solar-powered hot water system; Install rainwater tanks; Buy a more fuel-efficient car or think about not owning a car – perhaps you can share one; Move to an area where your workplace, shops...

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Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa
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Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa

Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa   Some 800 delegates from 59 countries, including ministers and other high-level government and international officials, together with non-state delegates, offered their insights into the challenges and possible responses to climate change, and harvested those insights for consideration in the official international climate negotiation process. Explanation. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache with UNFCCC   The collecting of views – under the banner of the year-long Talanoa Dialogue launched at negotiations in Bonn, Germany, in November 2017 – was a key part of Africa Climate Week that just concluded in Nairobi (Kenya). During this Africa Climate Week, co-organized with the African Development Bank and member of the Nairobi Framework Partnership ( NFP), from 9th to 13th April in Nairobi ( Kenya), some 800 delegates from 59 countries, including ministers and other high level expressed their responses to the threat of climate change, and harvested other insights for consideration in the official international climate negotiations process.  Action on climate change and sustainable development together are the keys for the development of Africa. The Nairobi Framework Partnership (NFP) is celebrating this year its 10th anniversary, as is the Africa Carbon Forum, which was launched by NFP to spur investment in climate action through carbon markets, mechanisms and finance. The NFP members include: the African Development Bank, Asian Development Bank, International Emissions Trading Association, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), UNEP DTU Partnership, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, United Nations Development Programme, UN Climate Change, and World Bank Group. Cooperating organizations include: Africa Low Emission Development Partnership, Climate Markets and Investment Association, Development Bank of Latin America, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, Inter-American Development Bank, Latin American Energy Organization and West African Development Bank. What was their messages exactly? At the first regional Talanoa event since the launch in Bonn, delegates distilled their deliberations into key messages: Finance – Public finance must be instrumental in unlocking private finance Markets – Carbon markets are about doing more together, and doing more with less Energy – Energy is a high priority, affecting everything. Financial instruments should be put in place to de-risk investment and enhance involvement in smaller and medium-sized enterprises Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – Achieving the SDGs, including the climate one is the only way forward Technology – Businesses are ready to pick up new technology solutions, provided there is a good business case. The voice of the private sector is needed now more than ever. “We are engaged across most of the Sustainable Development Goals and clearly focusing on how to create synergy between the different goals and especially with the climate goal, which is...

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COP 23- G20 committed to climate finance- Report
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COP 23- G20 committed to climate finance- Report

COP 23- G20 committed to climate finance- UNEP Report A new UN Environment research released recently explained that the G20 and other nations have taken huge strides over the last year towards mobilizing the trillions of dollars of public and private capital needed to make sustainable development and climate action a reality. Explanations. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache 18-07-2017   A new UN Environment research released recently explained that the G20 and other nations have taken huge strides over the last year towards mobilizing the trillions of dollars of public and private capital needed to make sustainable development and climate action a reality. “The world has committed to creating a better future for people and planet. But we will not be able to achieve our sustainable vision without the global financial system using its capital to fuel the transformation,” said Erik Solheim, head of UN Environment.   The investment required to bring sustainable development in developing countries was short US$2.5 trillion each year, with as much as ten times that needed globally in the years to come – mainly from private sources, UN Conference on Trade and Development research from 2015 showed, explained the study. The UN Environment Inquiry into the Design of a Sustainable Financial System’s Green Finance Progress Report – a contribution to the G20’s Green Finance Study Group (GFSG) – finds dozens of encouraging policies and financial product developments that show the public and private sectors are committed to find solutions, recalled the experts of the report. “This new research from UN Environment, a contribution to the G20 Green Finance Study Group, shows encouraging progress in this regard. From a record number of new green finance measures to ambitious plans for green finance hubs, we are seeing the smart money move to green financing, ” said Mr Solheim. Highlights from the report Based on the G20 Green Finance Synthesis Report, adopted at the G20 Leaders’ Summit in Hangzhou in September 2016, leaders are committed to accelerate and set out seven options identified to  mobilize  green finance. Over the last year, considerable progress has been made against these seven options by all G20 members, and the international community, in increasingly systemic national action, greater international cooperation, and increased market leadership, according to the research. More measures related to green finance have been introduced since June 2016 compared with any other one-year period since 2000. The trends and measures have resulted in increased flows of green finance, most notably in the issuance of green bonds, which grew by around 100 per cent to US$81 billion in 2016. Examples of specific country action include: ·         India: The Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) issued disclosure...

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