Wildlife experts meeting to enforce new rules in wildlife management
Juin24

Wildlife experts meeting to enforce new rules in wildlife management

Wildlife experts meeting to enforce new rules in wildlife management By Duncan Mboyah Wildlife experts in Zimbabwe’s Victoria Falls this week to enforce new rules in wildlife management. The summit that is being held from June 23 – 25, 2019 has been convened by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the African Union (AU) to radically change the way the continent’s nature-based economy is managed. “To save wildlife and preserve livelihoods, we must ensure that wild spaces remain a legitimate and competitive land-use option,” Joyce Msuya, Deputy Executive Director of UNEP said. Msuya noted that the there is urgent need to create a new and effective wildlife economy so as to ensure that they are used responsibly. A New led Africa-led vision The summit is a new, Africa-led vision of conservation that links the private sector with national authorities and local communities to design and finance conservation-compatible investments that deliver sustainable economic and ecological benefits to countries, people and the environment.   In Africa, businesses such as tourism, the harvesting of plants and natural products for food, cosmetics or medicines, wildlife credit schemes for direct payments for conservation, or fees, taxes and levies tied to the use of nature, employ millions of people and earn governments billions of dollars in revenue. “Africa has made significant headway in protecting natural spaces and conserving wildlife and ecosystems,” Josefa Correia Sacko, AU Commissioner for Rural Economy and Agriculture.   Sacko noted that it is time to boost economies through Africa-led public-private partnerships that place communities at the heart of investment, while taking into account the need to continue the conservation pathway.” Alongside commercial rewards, conserved habitats drive local, regional and global environmental benefits. According to UNEP and the World Conservation Monitoring Center the consumer spending on tourism, hospitality and recreation in Africa, estimated at $124 billion in 2015, is expected to reach $262 billion by 2030. They said that even as economies built on wildlife continue to grow, they must take into account economic, social and ecological sustainability. The African Wildlife Economy Initiative to be launched The summit is set to develop a road map to social sustainability that mainstreams local communities as co-investors in the nature-based economy. This will ensure that people living with nature must be at the center of transactions, and communities must be treated as equal partners, with their own conservation and development aspirations similarly valued alongside important interventions to conserve species. Emmerson Mnangagwa, President of Zimbabwe, will launch the African Wildlife Economy Initiative.   12 Ministerial delegations from Angola, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Gambia, Zambia, Chad and South Sudan are due to attend, as well as private sector...

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Nouvelle prise de fonction pour Fatima Denton
Sep27

Nouvelle prise de fonction pour Fatima Denton

Nouvelle prise de fonction pour Fatima Denton Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   Depuis le 10 septembre dernier,  Fatima Denton est la nouvelle Directrice de l’Université des Nations Unies pour les Ressources Naturelles en Afrique.Elle est dorénavant à la tête de l’Institut qui contribue au développement durable, à la gestion et à la gouvernance des ressources naturelles renouvelables et non renouvelables en Afrique. Basé à Accra au Ghana, cet institut mène des recherches et des formations à travers un réseau structuré au Cameroun, en Côte d’Ivoire, en Namibie, au Sénégal, et en Zambie. Un espoir pour l’Afrique Cette nouvelle expérience pour Fatima Denton est porteuse d’espoirs, selon le l’Université des Nations Unies. « La nomination de Fatima Denton comme Directrice est une promesse de développement pour la famille entière de l’Université des Nations Unies, » a déclaré récemment le recteur et secrétaire adjoint de l’Université, David Malone.  Fatima Denton apportera, selon ses dires,  une expertise profonde dans la gestion des ressources naturelles en Afrique ainsi que des connaissances profondes dans la recherche et la politique de développement. «  En tant que nouvelle directrice de l’Université des Nations Unies pour les ressources naturelles en Afrique, je vais poursuivre l’important travail de mon prédécesseur, Dr Elias Ayuk, en encourageant les partenariats stratégiques et en développant de forts et réciproques liens avec de nouvelles parties prenantes, »  a déclaré Dr Denton lors de sa nomination en août dernier. Et d’ajouter : «  J’espère élaborer des politiques pertinentes,  des projets de recherches à impact élevé. » Qui est Fatima Denton ? Originaire de la Gambie, Fatima Denton est polyglotte. Elle parle notamment l’anglais et le Français. Elle est fonctionnaire des Nations Unies depuis de nombreuses années. De 2012 à 2018, elle a  occupé le  double poste de Directrice du département de gestion des ressources naturelles et coordinatrice du Centre africain pour la politique en matière de climat  à la Commission Economique pour l’Afrique ( CEA). Doctorante en sciences politiques, Mme Denton  a  auparavant travaillé au Danemark  comme  scientifique de l’énergie pour le Centre Risoe du Programme des Nations Unies pour l’Environnement ( ONU Environnement aujourd’hui). Le centre Risoe a pour objectif  d’intégrer les aspects environnementaux et de développement dans la planification énergétique au niveau de la politique mondiale, avec un accent spécifique dans  les pays en voie de développement. Dr Denton a aussi été chef du programme du Centre de Recherche International basé au Canada ( IDRC), dans lequel elle a dirigé des recherches percutantes notamment une recherche importante sur un programme d’adaptation aux changements climatiques porté par plus de 100 initiatives, dont  40 projets dans 33 pays d’Afrique. Elle a aussi travaillé comme gestionnaire de programme sur l’Energie au Sénégal pour...

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Poor plant bio-security: A threat to regional food security integration
Mar23

Poor plant bio-security: A threat to regional food security integration

   Poor plant bio-security: A threat to regional food security integration By Newton Vusa Sibanda While intra-regional agricultural trade can reduce food insecurity and be a stepping stone to industrialization, poor bio-security control capacity remains a major obstacle to trade in agricultural products, and can therefore limit income and food security of farmers, according to recent bio-security meeting. Indeed, biosecurity experts from 10 Central and East African countries met in Lusaka ( Zambia) recently for the fourth Africa Plant Biosecurity Network workshop.    Common Market The network meetings are a key component of the Australia-Africa Plant Biosecurity Partnership (AAPBP. It brought together African biosecurity professional fellows and industry members from Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe with Australian biosecurity colleagues to share information, provide ongoing mentoring, and boost training and outreach. It also improved national and regional quarantine and plant protection capacity, thereby lifting crop yields, enabling safe regional trade, expanding international market access opportunities and securing greater food security for the region. Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) secretary General Sindiso Ngwenya is upbeat about the prospects of regional integration and called for efforts to address constraints such as poor bio-security control capacity. Mr Ngwenya said that a key result of regional integration should be increased intra-regional trade. Intra-regional trade has indeed increased from US$3.2 billion in 2000 when the free trade area (FTA) was launched to around US$20 billion. “However, this still amounts to less than 10 percent of total trade with the world. The secretariat has done a study to show that although intra-COMESA trade is currently low, there is a potential trade worth US$82 billion,” he said. “We need to work out how to realise that enormous potential,” Mr Ngwenya added. To him, many of COMESA’s 19 member states heavily dependent on agriculture, the production and trade of agricultural produce is of high priority. “Intra-regional agricultural trade can  reduce food insecurity, so we must address constraints to this trade such as biosecurity,” Mr Ngwenya said. “Those army worms do not need visas to cross borders. As COMESA, we are trying to open borders for free movement but not in a devastating manner like army worms,” he claimed. He attributed the lower intra-regional trade to costs of non-tariff measures, including sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) or biosecurity, which he said are higher than they need to be.  COMESA is leading studies to examine the actual costs of SPS measures,  and how they can be reduced without affecting the levels of protection they are designed to provide, he recalled. Agriculture: challenges Zambia’s acting minister of Agriculture Jean Kapata said agriculture is a priority sector in Zambia as...

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