New York-Climate Action Summit 2019: more ambitions are needed
Sep24

New York-Climate Action Summit 2019: more ambitions are needed

New York-Climate Action Summit 2019:  more ambitions are needed   Ahead of the 74 session of the United Nations General Assembly,  an United Nations Climate Action Summit opened with anger ““Nature is angry,” said Antonio Guterres. Youth activist Greta Thunberg told leaders “How dare you gamble with our future and continue talking about fairytales of eternal economic growth?” COP 25 to be held in December  and subsequently the UK Presidency of COP26, must ensure that governments deliver the adequate response to the emergency and ambition that puts the world on a 1.5C degrees trajectory, said  Climate Action Network International.  To the view of the International Policy Advisor of CAN,   Lucile Dufour, strong policies to reach ambitious targets  are needed : “France, as well as other developed countries, should be reminded that true climate leadership means concrete and urgent actions at home, not shiny speeches in front of world leaders.” For Mohamed Adow, International Climate Lead, Christian Aid,  leaders clearly failed :  “the few actions that have been announced are far from world changing and that is what is required”. What are  the ongoing commitments? Over 100 business leaders delivered  actions to align with the Paris Agreement targets, and speed up the transition from the grey to green economy, including asset-owners holding over $2 trillion in assets and leading companies with combined value also over $2 trillion. Many countries and over 100 cities – including many of the world’s largest – announced significant and concrete new steps to combat the climate crisis. 77 countries committed to cut greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050, while 70 countries announced they will either boost their national action plans by 2020 or have started the process of doing so. Many smaller countries, including Small Island Developing States and Least Developed Countries, were among those who made the biggest pledges, despite the fact the they have contributed the least to the problem. A few small island states and developing countries, as well as businesses, stepped up and committed to enhancing their targets based on science. Others, like Sweden, Luxembourg and Denmark pledged to double their contribution to the Green Climate Fund. These countries demonstrated much-needed leadership and underscored the feasibility of climate action and ambition. They showed that the energy transition is ongoing and irreversible. The issues Although, companies and governments boosted climate action momentum, and demonstrated growing recognition that the pace of climate action must be rapidly accelerated, some governments continue to   ignore science and fail to present ambitious climate commitments. Despite the alarm of climate change,  fossil fuel producers are still allowed to brazenly continue business as usual and generate profits at the expense of...

Read More
Information for all
Mai08

Information for all

Information for all Human health and biodiversity are in danger in the world right now. Around 1 million animal and plant species are now threatened with extinction, many within decades, more than ever before in human history, finds the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services ( IPBES) in a new report. Recently Comoros , Tanzania, Mozambique and India were devastated by a tropical cyclone . Zimbabwe, Malawi and Mozambique were hit by Cyclone Idai in March. Two unprecedented back-to-back tropical cyclones came in Mozambique in March and April causing the death of more than 1000 people. On April 24, Comoros Islands were hardly affected in coastal, rural and urban areas living 4 people dead and 15 000 people displaced (according to the first report published after the disaster). India was also devastated by a major cyclonic storm. According to the World Meteorology Organization, these cyclones underline the need for coordinated disaster risk reduction strategies, by including strong early warning systems which reach the people who need them most. What one can do with cyclones, climate change, extreme weather, floods, population increase? These issues will be debated during the second international conference on multi hazard early warning to be held in Geneva from 13-17 May. This global platform is a biennial multi-stakeholder forum established by the UN General Assembly to review progress, share knowledge, and discuss the latest developments and and trends in reducing disaster risk. Era Environnement takes this opportunity to publish this week a series of related stories called “Rivoukou-we are safe” about the people who were affected by Cyclone Kenneth in Comoros, one of the world “hospots” of biodiversity. We, as media based in Comoros Islands, in Samba M’bodoni, one of the villages which has seen homes and agricultural areas smashed by the cyclone Kenneth,  would like to put Comoros on the world map. Our aim is to also publish articles on others countries in Africa on disaster risk and solutions. We have already published articles during the cyclone in Comoros, Tanzania and Mozambique. We will also publish a column of an activist in Mozambique, and you will have the possibility to send your comment to her. Our facebook page Eraenvironnement, @sustainableDG, is also open for comments in French, Spanish, Portugese, English, Swahili and Comorian. Thank you Editorial by Houmi...

Read More
Séréhini: Après le Cyclone Kenneth
Mai07

Séréhini: Après le Cyclone Kenneth

Séréhini:  Après le Cyclone Kenneth Deux jours après le passage du cyclone Kenneth, les Comores se réveillent difficilement. Plusieurs habitations et récoltes sont détruites. Plus d’une dizaine de milliers de personnes sont touchées par le cyclone et 4 personnes sont décédées, selon les chiffres officiels.  A Séréhini,  à environ 6 kilomètres de la ville de Moroni, capitale des Comores,  un jeune homme est debout sur la route. Il fait très chaud. Le soleil brille à son Zénith.  Un autre jeune homme ,  casquette sur la tête,  est assis sur un banc en briques situé en face de la Présidence, la résidence secondaire du président des Comores construite dans les  années 80. Le taxi s’arrête et dépose des personnes. Il est 11h17.   Le jeune homme se lève.  Il  est accompagné par plusieurs jeunes hommes, les hommes se  dirigent vers des champs d’exploitation agricole. Il gère 10 champs loués  à des propriétaires vivant à Séréhini et dans la région pour un prix de 300 euros par champs et par an.  Il est le président de l’association d’agriculteurs Ujamaa. C’est la première fois qu’il subit une catastrophe naturelle.  A ce jour, il n’a reçu aucun soutien financier.  Une partie de ses récoltes est dévastée par le cyclone, notamment les bananeraies, cultures très appréciées par les comoriens,et très rentables. La destruction des bananeraies  est une perte énorme pour ce jeune homme de 32 ans, originaire d’Anjouan, l’île voisine située dans l’archipel des Comores. Monsieur Saifi, c’est son nom, travaille comme agriculteur à la Grande Comore depuis 13 ans. Il  a planté de nombreuses bananeraies dans les champs qu’il cultive.  Aux Comores, la population vit majoritairement de l’agriculture.  Les cultures vivrières et de rente sont abondantes, mais manquent d’usine de transformation et d’encadrement. Les Comores font partie des Pays les Moins Avancés au Monde.  L’installation de la bananeraie, de la cocoteraie,  mais aussi de taros  sous forêt naturelle est héritée de la colonisation. Il existe plusieurs espèces endémiques autour des bananeraies, plus particulièrement dans les forêts comoriennes.  Les Comores disposent d’un patrimoine faunistique méconnu au niveau international et son menacées depuis de nombreuses années par des problèmes environnementaux liés entre autres aux changements climatiques. Reportage. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache         Serehini1 (1)         Serehini2         lad_couvertedelaciterne   Monsieur Saifi vit à Vouvouni, une ville située au centre sud de Moroni, la capitale de l’Union des Comores. Chaque champs dispose d’une citerne qui permet d’arroser les cultures. Les perspectives Monsieur Saifi a été formé par un congolais de la République Démocratique du Congo qui travaillait au ministère de la production dans les années 80. Aujourd’hui cette personne est décédée, mais lui a permis d’apprendre à cultiver des cultures...

Read More
New York Climate Week: “We need to recognize the urgency we face”- Patricia Espinosa
Sep25

New York Climate Week: “We need to recognize the urgency we face”- Patricia Espinosa

New York Climate Week: “We need to recognize the urgency we face”- Patricia Espinosa At the opening ceremony of New York Climate Week on monday 24th, the Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change, Patricia Espinosa, called for more urgency in taking climate action and stressed the need for leadership and a committed multilateral response. Her address   Seventhy-three years ago, nations—ravaged by war, weary of its costs—pledged to achieve what had, for the first half of the century, been impossible: a lasting peace. The signing of the UN Charter in San Francisco was more than an agreement to get along. It established a rules-based international order, championed multilateralism over self-interest, and clarified that the path forward was not through conflict but collaboration.We bear the fruit of that work. Today, many are healthier, better educated, and more peaceful than at any point in history.ut humanity faces a new challenge; one that threatens current and future generations. The Paris Agreement Climate change is an opponent we shaped with our own hands, but whose power now threatens to overwhelm us. Throughout the world, extreme heatwaves, wildfires, storms and floods are leaving a trail of devastation and death.Developing countries suffer the worst, but climate change affects all nations—directly and indirectly. It’s a challenge that a rules-based international order is custom-designed to address—which led to the Paris Agreement. Like the UN Charter itself, its signing was an unprecedented multilateral success. But nations are not living up to what they promised. Under it, nations agreed to limit climate change to 2-degrees Celsius—ideally 1.5C. These targets are the bare minimum to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. But what nations have currently pledged under Paris will bring the global temperature up about 3C by 2100. Let us be clear: low ambition leads to a future where humanity no longer controls its own fate—runaway climate change does. Recent negotiations in Bangkok on the Paris Agreement’s implementation guidelines made some progress, but not enough. Recognizing the urgency We must therefore work harder than ever between now and COP24 to complete this work. We need to see leadership, we need to recognize the urgency we face, and we need to make a commitment to a decisive multilateral response. We have no other option. This means that we must listen to the voices of billions who understand that time itself is a dwindling resource when it comes to climate change. We must listen also to those who understand that addressing climate change provides extraordinary opportunity and are acting. Just as 73 years ago the UN Charter was signed in San Francisco and then moved to New York City……we’ve also just arrived from...

Read More
COP 23: A fellowship programme launched for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries
Nov17

COP 23: A fellowship programme launched for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries

COP 23: A fellowship programme for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries   A new one year  Programme titled “Capacity Award Programme to Advance Capabilities and Institutional Training  (CAPACITY) will be implemented by the Government of Italy and UN Climate Change. Explanations. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache The  Government of Italy and UN Climate Change have signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to launch a new Fellowship Programme aimed at strengthening the institutional capacity of the Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) to respond to the challenges arising from climate change. How will it work? It will support innovative analytical work on climate change in the context of sustainable development, promote a network of experts who can bring creating and innovative options to bear on questions of climate change, encourage the leadership potential of young and promising professionals in the fields. For  Patricia Espinosa, UN Climate Change Executive Secretary, this programme “marks an important step forward in our endeavor to ensure widest possible support to SIDS and LDC countries to combat climate change and help them build institutional capacity to resilience to climate impacts.” The government of Italy will provide support to launch this fellowship programme, according to Mrs Espinosa. Italy has agreed to provide a funding of 2,500,000 euros for the fellowship programme, which will initially be launched for a period for five years. Adaptation to climate change  in developing countries is crucial to enable these countries to Pursure the common objectives of developed and developing countries for sustainable development in a climate-friendly manner, said Gian Luca Galletti, the Italian Minister of the Environment, Land and Sea.   Who can have access to this programme?   SIDS and LDC mid-career professionals who are working in a broad range of national, regional, and local governmental organizations, ranging from educational institutions, research institutes and ministries are the target of this programme. Italy has agreed to provide a funding of 2,500,000 euros for the fellowship programme, which will initially be launched for a period for five years.   Annually, up to five one year fellowships will be awarded that can be further extended by one year. Selected fellows will have the opportunity to gain exposure to a wide range of opportunities available the UN Climate Change Secretariat in Bonn, Germany. They will be able to work on projects relating to the Paris Agreement, including Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), global climate action agenda, finance, legal, regulatory and institutional framework....

Read More
COP 23- Tonga hosts Pacific meeting on GCF funds
Juil18

COP 23- Tonga hosts Pacific meeting on GCF funds

COP 23- Tonga hosts Pacific meeting on GCF funds 07-18-2017 The Kingdom of Tonga hosts the Green Climate Fund’s Structured Dialogue with the Pacific during four days. This meeting is  organized in collaboration with the Governments of  Australia. It aims to accelerate the implementation of GCF projects and programmes approuved in the Pacific. The meeting has been  launched by the Deputy Prime Minister of Tonga and Minister of MEIDECC, Honourable Siaosi Sovaleni on July 18 at the Faónelua Convention Centre.  The dialogue will open with a High-Level Segment at Faónelua followed by a three-day Technical workshop at Tanoá International Hotel. GCF  Board Members, Secretariat Staff,  ministers of countries in the Pacific, senior government officials, including representatives of the GCF National Designated Entities and Focal points, private sector representatives and civil society organizations  are attending the meeting. The four- day gathering is an opportunity for countries and Accredites Entities to share their experiences in various programmes fund by the GCF. According to the GCF Communication department, the dialogue is expected to help Pacific Island countries identify Accredited Entities and private sector organisations to partner with. It will help identify Accredited Entities, including private sector partners to support the project proposals to fight climate change. This dialogue is  part of the sustained development of a Regional Roadmap initiated in 2016 GCF Regional Meeting which has to help strengthen Pacific Island countries engagement with the...

Read More