Comorians Coastal areas, after Cyclone Kenneth
Mai10

Comorians Coastal areas, after Cyclone Kenneth

Comorian Coastal areas, after Cyclone Kenneth   In Comoros, 7 people died  and  19,300 people were displaced because of   the tropical Cyclone Kenneth happened  from Wednesday  24th to Thusday 25 th of April. Most of the agriculture and coastal areas  were affected by the strongest tropical cyclone of the archipelago’s history.  The risk of water-borne diseases has increased in Comoros countries due to damage to water and sanitation infrastructure, acccording to United Nations Office for the Coordination for Human Affairs (OCHA). Six health facilities were reportedly impacted, including the El-Maarouf National Hospital Centre, two regional hospitals in Foumbouni and Mitsamiouli ( Grande Comore, ), two health posts in Mkazi and Tsinimoichongo ( Grande Comore)as well as a health centre in Nioumachoua  ( Moheli) , according to a rapid assessment conducted on 26 April and confirmed by World Health Organization. Known as one of the best  places to visit in Comoros, Mitsamiouli has seen  part of its infrastructures, trees, and homes destroyed  by the cyclone. Report by Houmi Ahamed -Mikidache     Mitsmiamiouli, northern Comoros Saturday April 27, Roukia, 28 years old, is sitting in the public bus,  the “taxi brousse”  in Gare du Nord in Moroni ( the capital of Comoros). Gare du Nord is the place where she used to take the bus after working many hours as a laboratory technician in hospital El Maarouf, the national hospital of Comoros. For the first time since the Cyclone came to Comoros, she can go to her mom’s place in Mitsamiouli. ” Everyone is safe, except the house, the roof disappeared,” she said.  The bus leaves Moroni. Roukia is looking around. It’s been three days since the Cyclone came to Comoros.  She could not come to her mom’s place before. “The roads were blocked by fallen trees, “she explained. She looks to the windows of the bus. ” This is first time I saw all these trees fallen in the street on my way to my mom’s place, ” she added. The bus passed through many localities which have been damaged by the storm. Finally, one hour later,  Roukia arrived in Mitsamiouli. Fishermen are sitting behind the sea. Mitsamiouli is one the towns in the north of Grande Comore which has been hardly demolished by the cyclone.    Listen to the interview of Shabaan Mohamed Mfwaraya in Comorian and French.       Comores The Fishermen in Mitsamiouli Fisherman Shabaane Mohamed Mfwaraya is  standing behind the sea with others fishermen, in the center of Mitsamiouli, in the north of  Grande Comore.   This  experienced fisherman said people in his town did not believe the cyclone will come. ” We were informed earlier by the Civil Security...

Read More
Séréhini: Après le Cyclone Kenneth
Mai07

Séréhini: Après le Cyclone Kenneth

Séréhini:  Après le Cyclone Kenneth Deux jours après le passage du cyclone Kenneth, les Comores se réveillent difficilement. Plusieurs habitations et récoltes sont détruites. Plus d’une dizaine de milliers de personnes sont touchées par le cyclone et 4 personnes sont décédées, selon les chiffres officiels.  A Séréhini,  à environ 6 kilomètres de la ville de Moroni, capitale des Comores,  un jeune homme est debout sur la route. Il fait très chaud. Le soleil brille à son Zénith.  Un autre jeune homme ,  casquette sur la tête,  est assis sur un banc en briques situé en face de la Présidence, la résidence secondaire du président des Comores construite dans les  années 80. Le taxi s’arrête et dépose des personnes. Il est 11h17.   Le jeune homme se lève.  Il  est accompagné par plusieurs jeunes hommes, les hommes se  dirigent vers des champs d’exploitation agricole. Il gère 10 champs loués  à des propriétaires vivant à Séréhini et dans la région pour un prix de 300 euros par champs et par an.  Il est le président de l’association d’agriculteurs Ujamaa. C’est la première fois qu’il subit une catastrophe naturelle.  A ce jour, il n’a reçu aucun soutien financier.  Une partie de ses récoltes est dévastée par le cyclone, notamment les bananeraies, cultures très appréciées par les comoriens,et très rentables. La destruction des bananeraies  est une perte énorme pour ce jeune homme de 32 ans, originaire d’Anjouan, l’île voisine située dans l’archipel des Comores. Monsieur Saifi, c’est son nom, travaille comme agriculteur à la Grande Comore depuis 13 ans. Il  a planté de nombreuses bananeraies dans les champs qu’il cultive.  Aux Comores, la population vit majoritairement de l’agriculture.  Les cultures vivrières et de rente sont abondantes, mais manquent d’usine de transformation et d’encadrement. Les Comores font partie des Pays les Moins Avancés au Monde.  L’installation de la bananeraie, de la cocoteraie,  mais aussi de taros  sous forêt naturelle est héritée de la colonisation. Il existe plusieurs espèces endémiques autour des bananeraies, plus particulièrement dans les forêts comoriennes.  Les Comores disposent d’un patrimoine faunistique méconnu au niveau international et son menacées depuis de nombreuses années par des problèmes environnementaux liés entre autres aux changements climatiques. Reportage. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache         Serehini1 (1)         Serehini2         lad_couvertedelaciterne   Monsieur Saifi vit à Vouvouni, une ville située au centre sud de Moroni, la capitale de l’Union des Comores. Chaque champs dispose d’une citerne qui permet d’arroser les cultures. Les perspectives Monsieur Saifi a été formé par un congolais de la République Démocratique du Congo qui travaillait au ministère de la production dans les années 80. Aujourd’hui cette personne est décédée, mais lui a permis d’apprendre à cultiver des cultures...

Read More
Residents vacate homes as Kenneth slowly lands in Mtwara
Avr25

Residents vacate homes as Kenneth slowly lands in Mtwara

Residents vacate homes as Kenneth slowly lands in Mtwara By Deodatus Mfugale Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Hundreds of Mtwara town residents and its environs have  vacated their homes to relocate to safer places before Tropical Storm Kenneth makes a landfall in Mtwara town in the afternoon today. By 6.00am today, light showers had started falling in the town and its outskirts as the wind also became stronger by the hour. Most of those who moved to safer places have their homes located close to shore, thus most vulnerable to the negative impacts of the tropical storm. The Mtwara Municipal Director Col. Emmanuel Mwaigobeko identified safe areas that people should move to as Mtwara airport,Majengo, and Tandika Primary schools, Naliendele army camp and Mitego and Sabodo secondary schools. “ All schools should remain closed. Employees should not go to work today and all should move to safe areas as directed. Do not take anything with you,” he stressed. Earlier the Tanzanania Meteorological Authority Manager for the Southern Zone Daudi Amasi had identified vulnerable areas from which people should vacate as including, Mikindani, Mtepwezi, Kiyanga, Kiyangu, Chuno, Miseti, Skoya and Rreli all of which are close to the shore. ”These are the areas that will probably be most hit by the storm. People must vacate their homes very early in the morning,” he warned, adding that people in other areas must also move to safe places. The Mtwara regional Commissioner Gelacius Byakanwa also warned  Mtwara residents, particularly fishermen to stay away from the ocean the whole day today until the situation normalized.”This warning also applies to all those who use vessels for purposes other than fishing. Please stay away from the ocean,” the RC warned. A resident of Mtwara town Abdallah Mbangile said in an interview that by 8.00 this morning the wind had started to gain strength and there were light showers.” We are leaving our homes and I am relocating to the airport for safety,” he said. However, not everyone heeded to the warning given by the leaders. “Some people are reluctant to leave their places; maybe they don’t realize the danger that goes with storms,” explained Mbangile. A journalist working for Safari Radio in Mtwara town, Baraka Jamal  said that there were light showers early in the morning and a weak wind. “There was a bit of wind at night but then it died off. Right now (8.15 am) there is a bit of wind, a weak one. Maybe it will pick up soon,” he said. According to the journalist all offices have been closed for today and residents have been seen relocating to places identified by the...

Read More
World Environment day: ” We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba
Juin05

World Environment day: ” We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba

World Environment day: “We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba*   On World Environment Day, there are plenty of words spoken about the obvious damage being wreaked by climate change – the chaos of hurricanes, wild fires and melting polar ice caps is there for all to see. But there’s another more hidden casualty of this new world of rising temperatures, drought, and increased natural disasters:  the education of our young people. At the simplest level, the wilder weather that we’re already seeing means children are prevented from getting to school. Hurricanes Irma and Harvey meant 1.7 millionUS students were temporarily unable to go to school last year – and officials in Puerto Rico have also recently announced plans to close over 280 schools following the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria. “Climate change is compounding educational inequalities that already exist” In wealthier nations, the damage caused by the increasing occurrence of extreme weather events more often than not tends to cause temporary disruption to children’s education.  But in poorer countries, the consequences can be far more long lasting. Buildings and infrastructure can take months or years to rebuild, with devastating implications for learning. Girls are most likely to be taken out of school in the wake of climate-related shocks, as was found in studies in Pakistan and Uganda after natural disasters there. So, indirectly, climate change is compounding educational inequalities that already exist. But the hardest hit parts of the world are those where universal education is still denied millions and Sub-Saharan Africa is on the front lines. Adult literacyrates are around 65%, compared to a global average of 86%. Here, over a fifth of childrenaged 6-11 are out of school, and a third of those aged 12-14. In Rwanda, we know the devastating impact of being forced from one’s home can have on a child’s education. But the big refugee crises of the future will not just be driven by war, but by the environment, with experts warning tens of millionsare likely to be displaced in the next decade by droughts and crop failures brought about by climate change.  What’s more, rising temperatures are predicted to result in the spread of lethal diseases. It is thought that a 2°C rise in temperatures could lead to an additional 40-60 million people in Africa being exposed to malaria. The disease is already one of the most significant factors in student absenteeism on the continent, with estimates ranging from 13 – 50%depending on the region.  Environmental changes are diminishing children’s education in other ways too. Malnourishmentdirectly affects children’s ability to learn. The World Food Programme has identified hunger and malnutrition as one of the most significant impacts of...

Read More
Bénin : les ressources halieutiques en péril
Août24

Bénin : les ressources halieutiques en péril

Au Bénin, les pêcheurs sont désorientés. Dans certaines localités, cette activité professionnelle n’est plus la principale source de revenus. Reportage. Par Hippolyte AGOSSOU 24 août 2017 La pêche, source importante de devise, contribue au Produit Intérieur Brut (PIB) du Benin. D’après le dernier rapport de l’OCDE sur les perspectives de développement en Afrique, le secteur agricole dont la pêche représentait 23,5 pourcent du PIB du Bénin en 2016. En 2011, ce secteur représentait 25,6  pourcent du PIB. Principal raison de cette baisse : les changements climatiques. D’après la FAO, l’Afrique  fait partie des régions les plus vulnérables aux changements climatiques. L’Afrique, faible émetteur d’émission de gaz à effet de serre, est victime du réchauffement planétaire. Ces changements climatiques affectent la pêche et peuvent laisser craindre de potentielles crises de sécurité alimentaire. Au Bénin, la pêche génère près de 600 000 emplois direct et indirect au plan national, selon Eugène Dessouassi de la direction de pêches. Plusieurs familles vivent donc de ce secteur. La pénurie Ces dernières années, les ressources naturelles du Benin sont victimes des grandes mutations liées aux changements climatiques. Le réchauffement planétaire bouleverse les habitudes des professionnels du secteur agricole dont la pêche. Les pêcheurs ne vivent plus véritablement de leur activité. « Tout a changé : après six heures passées au large, la moisson est vraiment maigre, » témoigne Ayo*, un pêcheur d’une cinquantaine d’années  au port de pêche de Cotonou, la capitale économique du Bénin. Et de poursuivre : « Il y a vingt voire trente ans, il fallait juste se concentrer au large pendant deux heures et trente minutes et on avait des poissons à la sortie, mais aujourd’hui, c’est différent, il n’y a plus rien »précise-t-il en descendant de sa barque. Le poisson se fait rare à Cotonou et les recettes des pêcheurs le sont aussi. Trois autres hommes viennent d’accoster. Quelques minutes plus tard, c’est la panique : nombreuses sont les personnes à se disputer le rendement peu productif des pêcheurs. Ce n’est pas facile. D’année en année, ils se retrouvent face à une pénurie de plus en plus prononcée et sont  incapables de satisfaire leur clientèle. Le ton monte, la clientèle habituelle ne veut pas partir sans rien obtenir. Finalement, les fidèles sont servis. « Avant, nos prises atteignaient quinze tonnes et plus par jour, mais aujourd’hui revenir avec une tonne de poisson est un véritable parcours de combattant, » assure Agla, le président de la coopérative de pêcheurs. Les écailleuses souffrent elles aussi de cette pénurie de poissons. « Quand j’ai commencé à travailler ici, j’étais très jeune mais chaque soir je rentrais avec un minimum de seize milles franc CFA [25 euros], mais maintenant le maximum que je gagne par jour...

Read More
Bénin- Erosion côtière : La population en alerte face aux promesses
Août06

Bénin- Erosion côtière : La population en alerte face aux promesses

Bénin- Erosion côtière :La  population en alerte face aux promesses   Le Bénin, un des 38 pays côtiers d’Afrique fait face à l’érosion côtière due aux activités naturelles et humaines. Les changements climatiques accentuent ce phénomène naturel. Principales victimes : les populations riveraines.  Reportage. Par Hippolyte AGOSSOU 06-08-2017   Consternation L’érosion côtière, résultat d’activités humaines et naturelles, accentuée par les dérèglements climatiques. La hausse de la température se fait sentir particulièrement dans les zones côtières d’Afrique, par, entre autres, l’élévation du niveau de la mer. Le quartier Jack de Cotonou , dans la capitale économique du Bénin, n’est pas épargné. Les habitants de ce quartier  sont inquiets. « Depuis 2001, les politiques, à la veille d’élections, nous promettent d’entreprendre des projets de grande envergure, mais finalement lorsqu’ils arrivent au pouvoir, il n’y aucun résultat, » explique, Rachel, une habitante du quartier. Rachel et ses voisins vivent quotidiennement sous la menace des vagues. Le niveau de la mer monte entraînant des dégâts et la peur est de plus en plus présente surtout la nuit. La population a en effet peur d’être envahie par les vagues.  Le jour est source d’espoir. Difficile tout de même de garder son calme. « Combien de temps cette situation va-t-elle encore durer ? », s’interroge Awali, un étudiant du quartier. Et de poursuivre : « Depuis que je suis en seconde, des gens viennent recenser nos familles : il y a peine deux semaines, ils sont passés pour savoir ce que nous avons perdu et presque tous les jours des mesures de la plage sont effectuées près de notre domicile, mais au bout du rouleau rien n’avance, » conclut-il avec désolation. Les drames Suite aux marées d’avril 2016, le gouvernement de Patrice TALON  s’est engagé à mobiliser des ressources pour la protection et la valorisation des zones côtières. Mais le quartier Jack est toujours en attente. Principal obstacle : les formalités administratives. Il existerait un problème de montage de dossier de passation des marchés au sein des Directions techniques du Ministère du cadre de vie. Mais cette information n’est pas confirmée par les autorités. « Les appels offres sont lancés : les entreprises soumissionnaires sont attendues,» affirme récemment Adolphe Tohoundjo, Directeur de l’aménagement des berges et des côtes. « Mon jeune frère a été emporté l’année dernière par les vagues, » explique Paul, un étudiant, vivant dans le quartier. Sa famille est traumatisée et demande de l’aide parce que les vagues sont de plus en plus violentes. «  Nombreuses maisons ont été englouties par la mer et certaines écoles publiques du quartier vont bientôt disparaître : Il faut que le Gouvernement réagisse ! », exhorte le père de Paul, les larmes aux yeux. Des faits prouvés par la science L’érosion côtière  devrait se poursuivre...

Read More