New York-Climate Action Summit 2019: more ambitions are needed
Sep24

New York-Climate Action Summit 2019: more ambitions are needed

New York-Climate Action Summit 2019:  more ambitions are needed   Ahead of the 74 session of the United Nations General Assembly,  an United Nations Climate Action Summit opened with anger ““Nature is angry,” said Antonio Guterres. Youth activist Greta Thunberg told leaders “How dare you gamble with our future and continue talking about fairytales of eternal economic growth?” COP 25 to be held in December  and subsequently the UK Presidency of COP26, must ensure that governments deliver the adequate response to the emergency and ambition that puts the world on a 1.5C degrees trajectory, said  Climate Action Network International.  To the view of the International Policy Advisor of CAN,   Lucile Dufour, strong policies to reach ambitious targets  are needed : “France, as well as other developed countries, should be reminded that true climate leadership means concrete and urgent actions at home, not shiny speeches in front of world leaders.” For Mohamed Adow, International Climate Lead, Christian Aid,  leaders clearly failed :  “the few actions that have been announced are far from world changing and that is what is required”. What are  the ongoing commitments? Over 100 business leaders delivered  actions to align with the Paris Agreement targets, and speed up the transition from the grey to green economy, including asset-owners holding over $2 trillion in assets and leading companies with combined value also over $2 trillion. Many countries and over 100 cities – including many of the world’s largest – announced significant and concrete new steps to combat the climate crisis. 77 countries committed to cut greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050, while 70 countries announced they will either boost their national action plans by 2020 or have started the process of doing so. Many smaller countries, including Small Island Developing States and Least Developed Countries, were among those who made the biggest pledges, despite the fact the they have contributed the least to the problem. A few small island states and developing countries, as well as businesses, stepped up and committed to enhancing their targets based on science. Others, like Sweden, Luxembourg and Denmark pledged to double their contribution to the Green Climate Fund. These countries demonstrated much-needed leadership and underscored the feasibility of climate action and ambition. They showed that the energy transition is ongoing and irreversible. The issues Although, companies and governments boosted climate action momentum, and demonstrated growing recognition that the pace of climate action must be rapidly accelerated, some governments continue to   ignore science and fail to present ambitious climate commitments. Despite the alarm of climate change,  fossil fuel producers are still allowed to brazenly continue business as usual and generate profits at the expense of...

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Comment reconstruire Maweni ya Mbude
Mai10

Comment reconstruire Maweni ya Mbude

Comment reconstruire Maweni ya Mbude   Deux jours après le passage du  cyclone Kenneth, ERA ENVIRONNEMENT s’est rendue à Maweni ya Mbudé ou Maoueni Mboudé, une localité située au nord de la Grande Comore, près d’un autre village agricole Ivembéni. Reconstruire ce village   est la priorité des agronomes. Comment ? Que représente Maweni ya Mbudé à la Grande Comore? Cette localité est l’une des  six localités exploitant la forêt de la Grille, une forêt claire et humide de moyenne altitude où est pratiquée l’agroforesterie. Les agriculteurs y cultivent le taro, le manioc, la patate douce et la banane. A noter que 80% des cultures vivrières des Comores sont destinés à l’autoconsommation. La banane est le produit de l’agriculture locale le plus consommé aux Comores. Les bananes sont le quatrième aliment de base mondial derrière le riz, le blé et le maïs, selon l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’Alimentation et l’Agriculture (FAO). D’après la FAO, la production annuelle en 2013 était  estimée à quelque 107 millions de tonnes, avec seulement 16 millions de tonnes destinées au marché international, pour une valeur de près de 9 milliards de dollars.  A Maweni Ya Mbudé, le cyclone Kenneth a détruit toutes les bananeraies. Or, les Comores sont connues pour leur diversité de  bananes. Problème:  la destruction des bananeraies  par le cyclone remet en question la durabilité de cette ressource agricole. L’agriculture aux Comores est victime des très fortes chaleurs, d’une pluviométrie intense et variable, d’espèces envahissantes, d’une baisse de la biodiversité en lien avec l’évolution du climat. Selon la seconde communication nationale sur les changements climatiques éditée en 2012, les cyclones et leur violence aggravée entraîneraient une diminution du rendement et pénaliseraient les familles des producteurs. Atoumani Moilim, Ingénieur Agronome, ancien étudiant à Dakar au Sénégal, diplômé d’un master en gestion de la fertilité du sol donne son avis sur la question et apporte ses solutions. Ecoutez       AtoumaniMoilim Propos recueillis par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Maweni Ya Mboudé Crédit photo: Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache...

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Comorians Coastal areas, after Cyclone Kenneth
Mai10

Comorians Coastal areas, after Cyclone Kenneth

Comorian Coastal areas, after Cyclone Kenneth   In Comoros, 7 people died  and  19,300 people were displaced because of   the tropical Cyclone Kenneth happened  from Wednesday  24th to Thusday 25 th of April. Most of the agriculture and coastal areas  were affected by the strongest tropical cyclone of the archipelago’s history.  The risk of water-borne diseases has increased in Comoros countries due to damage to water and sanitation infrastructure, acccording to United Nations Office for the Coordination for Human Affairs (OCHA). Six health facilities were reportedly impacted, including the El-Maarouf National Hospital Centre, two regional hospitals in Foumbouni and Mitsamiouli ( Grande Comore, ), two health posts in Mkazi and Tsinimoichongo ( Grande Comore)as well as a health centre in Nioumachoua  ( Moheli) , according to a rapid assessment conducted on 26 April and confirmed by World Health Organization. Known as one of the best  places to visit in Comoros, Mitsamiouli has seen  part of its infrastructures, trees, and homes destroyed  by the cyclone. Report by Houmi Ahamed -Mikidache     Mitsmiamiouli, northern Comoros Saturday April 27, Roukia, 28 years old, is sitting in the public bus,  the “taxi brousse”  in Gare du Nord in Moroni ( the capital of Comoros). Gare du Nord is the place where she used to take the bus after working many hours as a laboratory technician in hospital El Maarouf, the national hospital of Comoros. For the first time since the Cyclone came to Comoros, she can go to her mom’s place in Mitsamiouli. ” Everyone is safe, except the house, the roof disappeared,” she said.  The bus leaves Moroni. Roukia is looking around. It’s been three days since the Cyclone came to Comoros.  She could not come to her mom’s place before. “The roads were blocked by fallen trees, “she explained. She looks to the windows of the bus. ” This is first time I saw all these trees fallen in the street on my way to my mom’s place, ” she added. The bus passed through many localities which have been damaged by the storm. Finally, one hour later,  Roukia arrived in Mitsamiouli. Fishermen are sitting behind the sea. Mitsamiouli is one the towns in the north of Grande Comore which has been hardly demolished by the cyclone.    Listen to the interview of Shabaan Mohamed Mfwaraya in Comorian and French.       Comores The Fishermen in Mitsamiouli Fisherman Shabaane Mohamed Mfwaraya is  standing behind the sea with others fishermen, in the center of Mitsamiouli, in the north of  Grande Comore.   This  experienced fisherman said people in his town did not believe the cyclone will come. ” We were informed earlier by the Civil Security...

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Call for action for Post Idai-Kenneth
Mai09

Call for action for Post Idai-Kenneth

Call for action for Post Idai-Kenneth *By Thelma Munhequete  Demand to access to technical know-how The gap between humanitarian management policy and actual SOS management practices is widening, due to ongoing capacity constraints or non-existence SOS management facilities for  the different climate disasters. Resolving this capacity gap will require major investments and access to technical know-how. A group of friends and colleagues and private stakeholders from all over the world are willing to help the people in Beira, in Mozambique; based on the set of guiding ideas and principals on this humanitarian action. It involves ethics and value to standardize the conduct and behaviour to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, reputation, integrity and credibility of Post IDAI Action Plan.   The Sustainable Development Goals to take into account The newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals that have replaced the Millennium Development Goals provide a generational opportunity to address the lingering problems the world still and will still face following the MDGs. Achieving  the management of climate disaster  by prevention and explaining the  significant adverse effects  of climate disaster in human health and the environment, is  essential and it is part of the three sustainable development goals below: 1. Goal 4 Target 4,1 “by 2030 ,ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant effective learning outcomes” 2. Goal 11 “Make cities and human settlements inclusive ,safe resilient and sustainable” Target 11.6 “by 2020,the world should reduce the adverse per capital environmental impacts of cities ,including by paying special attention to air quality ,municipal, 3. Goal 12 “Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns “Target 12.5 “by 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse Engaging all  stakeholders The 3rd AFRICA CLIMATE SMART AGRICULTURE ALLIANCE FORUM held in Dakar 27th and 28th March 2019, highlighted the latest thinking on Stakeholder engagements, particularly the need to stem the flow of mass production and consumption inherent in a take-make-waste, linear economy by reducing demand and shifting to reusable Climate Smart Agriculture in African context as well as the Gender inclusion. Engaging the general public, the private sector, organizations, policy makers, and local governments in Africa in sustainable strategy is urgent in Africa. The experiences of school project implemented  in Mozambique in 2013 showed the importance of  the Gender Climate Change (CCGAP) issue. The currently Integrated Management Chemical Pollutants and Solid Waste as well as Child Protection and ongoing Climate smart Agriculture project (focus on Cassava roots) made great strides to develop a communities disaster risks management strategies. Financing opportunities Financing opportunities for Climate Smart Agriculture can be the key, through  investments for smallholders systems.  Finding Climate Smart Agriculture strategies   by deploying Information and...

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Séréhini: Après le Cyclone Kenneth
Mai07

Séréhini: Après le Cyclone Kenneth

Séréhini:  Après le Cyclone Kenneth Deux jours après le passage du cyclone Kenneth, les Comores se réveillent difficilement. Plusieurs habitations et récoltes sont détruites. Plus d’une dizaine de milliers de personnes sont touchées par le cyclone et 4 personnes sont décédées, selon les chiffres officiels.  A Séréhini,  à environ 6 kilomètres de la ville de Moroni, capitale des Comores,  un jeune homme est debout sur la route. Il fait très chaud. Le soleil brille à son Zénith.  Un autre jeune homme ,  casquette sur la tête,  est assis sur un banc en briques situé en face de la Présidence, la résidence secondaire du président des Comores construite dans les  années 80. Le taxi s’arrête et dépose des personnes. Il est 11h17.   Le jeune homme se lève.  Il  est accompagné par plusieurs jeunes hommes, les hommes se  dirigent vers des champs d’exploitation agricole. Il gère 10 champs loués  à des propriétaires vivant à Séréhini et dans la région pour un prix de 300 euros par champs et par an.  Il est le président de l’association d’agriculteurs Ujamaa. C’est la première fois qu’il subit une catastrophe naturelle.  A ce jour, il n’a reçu aucun soutien financier.  Une partie de ses récoltes est dévastée par le cyclone, notamment les bananeraies, cultures très appréciées par les comoriens,et très rentables. La destruction des bananeraies  est une perte énorme pour ce jeune homme de 32 ans, originaire d’Anjouan, l’île voisine située dans l’archipel des Comores. Monsieur Saifi, c’est son nom, travaille comme agriculteur à la Grande Comore depuis 13 ans. Il  a planté de nombreuses bananeraies dans les champs qu’il cultive.  Aux Comores, la population vit majoritairement de l’agriculture.  Les cultures vivrières et de rente sont abondantes, mais manquent d’usine de transformation et d’encadrement. Les Comores font partie des Pays les Moins Avancés au Monde.  L’installation de la bananeraie, de la cocoteraie,  mais aussi de taros  sous forêt naturelle est héritée de la colonisation. Il existe plusieurs espèces endémiques autour des bananeraies, plus particulièrement dans les forêts comoriennes.  Les Comores disposent d’un patrimoine faunistique méconnu au niveau international et son menacées depuis de nombreuses années par des problèmes environnementaux liés entre autres aux changements climatiques. Reportage. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache         Serehini1 (1)         Serehini2         lad_couvertedelaciterne   Monsieur Saifi vit à Vouvouni, une ville située au centre sud de Moroni, la capitale de l’Union des Comores. Chaque champs dispose d’une citerne qui permet d’arroser les cultures. Les perspectives Monsieur Saifi a été formé par un congolais de la République Démocratique du Congo qui travaillait au ministère de la production dans les années 80. Aujourd’hui cette personne est décédée, mais lui a permis d’apprendre à cultiver des cultures...

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UNFCCC: A new gate for the Talanoa Dialogue
Jan27

UNFCCC: A new gate for the Talanoa Dialogue

UNFCCC: A new gate for the Talanoa Dialogue The UN Climate Change secretariat launched yesterday a new portal to support the Talanoa Diaologue, an important international conversation in which countries will check progress and seek to increase global ambition to meet the goals of the Paris Climate Change Agreement. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   How will it work? Through the portal, all countries and other stakeholders, including business, investors, cities, regions and civil society, are invited to make submissions into the Talanoa Dialogue around three central questions: Where are we? Where do we want to go? How do we get there? Countries and non-Party stakeholders will be contributing ideas, recommendations and information that can assist the world in taking climate action to the next level in order to meet the objectives of the Paris Agreement and support the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The Talanoa Dialogue The Dialogue was launched at the UN Climate Change Conference COP23 in Bonn in November 2017 and will run throughout 2018. The Paris Agreement’s central goal is keep the global average temperature rise to below 2C degrees and as close as possible to 1.5C. Current global ambition to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to prepare societies to resist increasing climate change is not enough to achieve this under the current national climate action plans known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs). “The portal is the gateway for the Talanoa Dialogue. It represents the central point for everyone to make their views heard around enhanced ambition. Additionally, it will make available other key resources for the dialogue,” said Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change. “I very much welcome the portal because it provides transparency and broadens participation in the dialogue. I look forward to many governments and other actors making their submissions via the portal as part of world-wide efforts required for the next level of climate action and ambition”, she said. The Pacific island concept of ‘Talanoa’ was introduced by Fiji, which held the Presidency of the COP23 UN Climate Change Conference. It aims at an inclusive, participatory and transparent dialogue. The purpose of the concept is to share stories, build empathy and to make wise decisions for the collective good. The Talanoa method purposely avoids blame and criticism to create a safe space for the exchange of ideas and collective decision-making. The Talanoa Dialogue will be constructive, facilitative and oriented towards providing solutions and will see both technical and political exchanges....

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