African Climate Talks II: Africa needs to act urgently
Avr11

African Climate Talks II: Africa needs to act urgently

African Climate Talks II: Africa needs to act urgently By Olumide Idowu* Participants attending the African Climate Talks II (ACT-II) in Addis Ababa ( Ethiopia) in March,  called Africa to change how it does business to reap the benefits of the Paris Agreement. Attending the two-day talks last month called “Market policy versus market mechanisms in the implementation of the Paris Agreement”, speakers asked for an urgent shift in how the continent will forge ahead to escape the consequences of climate change. Ambassador Lumumba Di-Aping, from South Sudan and former chair of the G77 called for strengthening of the current regime, noting that the current Paris Agreement is fundamentally flawed and inadequate. “The agreement will be the main basis for multilateral cooperation during the first period of commitments (2020-2030). The African Continent in this new architecture is tragically weaker than even before,” Di-Aping said. He urged Africa to reinvent itself consistently through science. “We must think “out of the box” to build the framework for a more effective effort from 2025 onwards – one consistent with Africa’s survival and prosperity,” he said. Dr James Murombedzi, the Officer in Charge of the Africa Climate Centre Policy (ACPC) noted that the continent needs to invest in strong evidence based African narrative. “This narrative should have a science, research and policy interface. We also should invest in informed societies that participate in the shaping of policies and strengthen capacities of countries,” Murombedzi said. “The temperatures are rising and Africa is suffering. Let us unite to save our continent. Let us develop sustainable ways of dealing with climate change,” Woldu said. Di-Aping noted that Africa must move beyond the old dichotomy of “mitigation and adaptation.” “We must look at each sector – agriculture, industry etc – and focus on integrating climate considerations into wider industrial and development planning in an integrated way. The climate regime must focus not just on “emissions reductions” but on the real solutions needed to achieve them,” Di-Aping said. He urged for negotiations which provide a space where these with problems, with solutions and with money, can meet as part of a structured process. “We need to make the UNFCCC more relevant to the real world.  The Africa Renewable Energy Initiative is to be commended as an important step in the energy sector – we need matching initiatives in each other sector,” he said. “Let us think about the financial sector and financial instruments and engineering. If we need a major plan to address 1.50C, the question arises how to fund it. Clearly the $10 billion in the GCF will not be enough; and developed countries have no intention...

Read More
UNFCCC: A new gate for the Talanoa Dialogue
Jan27

UNFCCC: A new gate for the Talanoa Dialogue

UNFCCC: A new gate for the Talanoa Dialogue The UN Climate Change secretariat launched yesterday a new portal to support the Talanoa Diaologue, an important international conversation in which countries will check progress and seek to increase global ambition to meet the goals of the Paris Climate Change Agreement. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   How will it work? Through the portal, all countries and other stakeholders, including business, investors, cities, regions and civil society, are invited to make submissions into the Talanoa Dialogue around three central questions: Where are we? Where do we want to go? How do we get there? Countries and non-Party stakeholders will be contributing ideas, recommendations and information that can assist the world in taking climate action to the next level in order to meet the objectives of the Paris Agreement and support the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The Talanoa Dialogue The Dialogue was launched at the UN Climate Change Conference COP23 in Bonn in November 2017 and will run throughout 2018. The Paris Agreement’s central goal is keep the global average temperature rise to below 2C degrees and as close as possible to 1.5C. Current global ambition to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to prepare societies to resist increasing climate change is not enough to achieve this under the current national climate action plans known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs). “The portal is the gateway for the Talanoa Dialogue. It represents the central point for everyone to make their views heard around enhanced ambition. Additionally, it will make available other key resources for the dialogue,” said Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change. “I very much welcome the portal because it provides transparency and broadens participation in the dialogue. I look forward to many governments and other actors making their submissions via the portal as part of world-wide efforts required for the next level of climate action and ambition”, she said. The Pacific island concept of ‘Talanoa’ was introduced by Fiji, which held the Presidency of the COP23 UN Climate Change Conference. It aims at an inclusive, participatory and transparent dialogue. The purpose of the concept is to share stories, build empathy and to make wise decisions for the collective good. The Talanoa method purposely avoids blame and criticism to create a safe space for the exchange of ideas and collective decision-making. The Talanoa Dialogue will be constructive, facilitative and oriented towards providing solutions and will see both technical and political exchanges....

Read More
Fighting climate change in Liberia
Jan25

Fighting climate change in Liberia

A few months after COP 23 and a few days after the  inauguration of the new President of Liberia, George Weah, Era Environnement shares with you the interview of the National Coordinator of the Green Climate Fund in Liberia, Jeremiah G. Sokan. This interview took place in Bonn, Germany during COP 23 by Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache.             Introduction to Jeremiah G. Sokan and his view on climate finance during COP 23       JeremiahSokanLiberia His view on the US position on the Paris Agreement and the consequences for the implementation of the Paris Accord.       JeremiahSokanLiberia2 What can be the role of the African Presidents for the implementation of the Paris Agreement? How about Liberia and its climate change policy toward the youth?...

Read More
Sommet UA-UE: Côte d’Ivoire: “Nous pouvons présenter maintenant des nouveaux métiers aux jeunes”- Dr Alain-Serges Kouadio
Nov29

Sommet UA-UE: Côte d’Ivoire: “Nous pouvons présenter maintenant des nouveaux métiers aux jeunes”- Dr Alain-Serges Kouadio

Sommet UA-UE: Côte d’Ivoire: “Nous pouvons présenter maintenant des nouveaux métiers aux jeunes”- Dr Alain-Serges Kouadio Comme précisé récemment, Era Environnement vous fait découvrir les solutions africaines en amont du One planet Summit prévu le 12 décembre prochain. A quelques heures du  Sommet entre l’Union Africaine et l’Union Européenne dédié à la jeunesse africaine, Era Environnement  vous fait découvrir  les solutions de développement sobre en carbone disponibles en Afrique. Dr Alain-Serges Kouadio,  ancien chercheur, économiste de l’environnement à l’Université Nangui-Abrogoua  (Côte d’Ivoire) et actuel  Directeur de l’économie verte et de la Responsabilité Sociétale des Entreprises  au ministère de l’environnement de la Côte d’Ivoire, s’est confié à Era Environnement récemment, en  présentant notamment les différentes opportunités d’intégration de la jeunesse africaine dans les nouveaux métiers verts en Afrique. Entretien.   Era Environnement : Ces dernières années, on parle beaucoup des opportunités  des changements climatiques et du développement durable pour et par les entreprises. Comment intégrez-vous ces notions ? Dr Alain-Serges Kouadio : Avant tout, je voudrais dire que le changement climatique, c’est la biologie animale, la biologie végétale, la biodiversité, la géologie, la climatologie la météorologie. C’est multidisciplinaire, pour ne pas dire transdisciplinaire, lorsqu’on veut arriver à des solutions intégrées et durables. Le Développement durable , c’est tout ce qui est économique et finance. Il faut comprendre les réalités économiques et c’est ce que nous faisons avec le partenariat mondial sur les stratégies bas carbones, Africa LEDS Partnership. En tant que directeur de l’économie verte au ministère de l’environnement de la Côte d’Ivoire,, j’ai été sollicité par ce partenariat mondial sur les stratégies bas carbone il y a deux ans. Ce partenariat  regroupe aujourd’hui plus de 25 pays avec 200 à 300 membres. Ses objectifs : aider les différents pays à élaborer leur stratégie bas carbone, avec une forte connotation socio-économique dans la lutte contre la pauvreté et le chômage notamment des jeunes. Aujourd’hui, avec ce partenariat, on  essaye d’affirmer un certain leadership. Comment cela se traduit-il dans votre pays ? Au niveau de la responsabilité sociétale en Côte d’Ivoire, nous sommes en train de renforcer le cadre réglementaire pour encadrer et encourager l’ensemble des entreprises qui ont une démarche de responsabilité sociétale. Nous sommes en train d’introduire un décret sur la responsabilité sociétale des entreprises et ce décret est élaboré avec une forte inclusion du patronat ivoirien, avec une forte inclusion des différentes chambres consulaires et des universités et puis des différents ministères clés. Lorsque je suis arrivée à la tête de l’économie verte et de la Responsabilité Sociétale en Entreprise, la plupart des parties prenantes avaient besoin d’avoir un cadre de mise en œuvre, un cadre  d’expression de la Responsabilité Sociétale en Entreprise....

Read More
COP 23: Au fond de l’eau
Nov16

COP 23: Au fond de l’eau

COP 23: Au fond de l’eau   La conférence des Nations Unies sur les Changements  Climatiques présidée par les îles Fidji se poursuit. Les demandes restent les mêmes et sont discutées à travers le Dialogue  de Talanoa ( terme signifiant conversation) initié par les îles Fidji et organisé par des consultations informelles, alors que les chefs d’Etats et de gouvernement  s’expriment à Bonn. Résumé des travaux. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Ce que pensent  les îles Fidji Face au dialogue de Talanoa toujours en cours, les îles Fidji, premier Etat insulaire à présider la conférence des Nations Unies sur les Changements climatiques  reste positives. Mais, elles ont rappelé que  la question de la finance et le rôle du fonds d’adaptation font  l’objet de 12 articles à l’ordre du jour des  travaux de la mise en œuvre de l’Accord de Paris. «  Nous, en tant que présidence des Fidji, exprimons notre intérêt spécial de voir comment le fonds d’adaptation va servir l’Accord de Paris et des dialogues sont en cours sur le financement des 100 milliards de dollars par an ( à partir de 2020), a déclaré lors d’une conférence de presse Nazhat Shameem Khan, l’ambassadeur des Fidji auprès des Nations Unies. Le président de la COP 23, le premier ministre Frank Bainimarama,  à quant à lui souligné que  l’Allemagne a  annoncé, à l’ouverture de la COP,  un financement de 50 millions d’euros à destination du fonds d’adaptation pour les pays les moins avancés. Quel est la position de l’Union Européenne? Cette semaine, l’Union Européenne se donne trois objectifs à atteindre  : accomplir les progrès sur l’atténuation, centrés les points mandatés du programme de travail de l’Accord de Paris et maintenir l’équilibre imprimés à l’accord. Mais quelles ont été les demandes de la société civile? A l’ouverture des négociations sur le climat, la société civile, au nom d’un groupe d’ONGs,  Third World Network, s’est manifestée lors de plusieurs conférences de presse pour une prise en compte des actions pré-2020  dans le cadre du protocole de Kyoto mis en application il y a vingt ans mais non ratifié par de nombreux pays dont les Etats-Unis d’Amérique. « On ne peut parler des actions post-2020, sans traiter des actions pré-2020 » à déclaré Mohammed Ado, de Christian Aids. Mardi, le Réseau Climat et Développement, représenté par Aissatou Diouf a exprimé ses inquiétudes face au déséquilibre des contributions nationales africaines. « La plupart des pays africains ont mis l’accent sur l’atténuation dans leur Contribution Prévue Déterminée Nationale, le volet adaptation ne doit pas être occulté : Il y a des soucis sur le financement aussi bien pour le fonds d’adaptation que pour le fonds vert. Le WWF international, quant à...

Read More
COP 23 : La société civile béninoise pour les énergies renouvelables
Nov09

COP 23 : La société civile béninoise pour les énergies renouvelables

COP 23 : La société civile béninoise pour les énergies renouvelables L’organisation de la société civile Jeunes Volontaires pour l’Environnement est actuellement en campagne en Afrique pour l’utilisation des énergies renouvelables. Sa représentation béninoise a récemment organisé une conférence de presse à ce titre. Présentation. Par Hippolyte AGOSSOU Facteur essentiel du développement de tout pays ambitionnant d’éradiquer la pauvreté , l’énergie est le septième  Objectif du Développement Durable à atteindre d’ici 2030. Un objectif que souhaite atteindre la République du Bénin. Pourtant, comme dans plusieurs pays africains, le pétrole et d’autres sources d’énergies polluantes sont toujours utilisées dans ce pays. Des acteurs de la société civile africaine ont souhaité récemment rompre le silence à travers une conférence de presse sur l’ adoption  des énergies renouvelables en Afrique. A travers la campagne  « Global Power Shift (GPS) West Africa », l’ONG Jeunes Volontaires pour l’Environnement (JVE ) est en campagne de sensibilisation en Afrique de l’Ouest. Première destination au Bénin : Cotonou. Leur slogan: “DeCOALonise Africa” Leur  leitmotiv : « non à l’utilisation des combustibles fossiles et aux centrales à charbon » en Afrique et pour la promotion des initiatives et des mouvements visant à mettre fin au charbon et à toutes sources d’énergies polluantes. La représentation de l’organisation régionale africaine Jeunes Volontaires Bénin, a présenté les conséquences de l’utilisation des  énergies fossiles. L’utilisation de centrale à charbon provoque de graves problèmes de santé liés au contact  du méthane, des oxydes d’azote et de gaz carboniques. Le pétrole et ses dérivés  libèrent aussi une grande quantité de gaz carbonique et entraîne le réchauffement planétaire. « Il faut abandonner les projets fossiles et remplacer sans attendre les infrastructures existantes : les énergies nouvelles et renouvelables sont des alternatives à ne pas négliger, » a déclaré  Mawusé Hountondji, directeur exécutif de Jve-Bénin. Pour les membres de la société civile béninoise, l’initiative d’accès à l’énergie propre en Afrique présentée à la COP 21 et soulignée dans l’Accord de Paris doit être développée au Bénin. Présent lors de cet atelier de sensibilisation, le représentant du Centre Valdera, un laboratoire universitaire de transformation des déchets en énergie renouvelable  a présenté les opportunités que représentent les énergies renouvelables pour les pays africains et particulièrement pour le Bénin. La création de nouveaux métiers a été l’une des solutions...

Read More