UN Climate Action Summit 2019: The Major Announcements
Sep24

UN Climate Action Summit 2019: The Major Announcements

UN Climate Action Summit 2019: The Major announcements At the Opening of the UN Climate Action Summit 2019 on  23rd  september 2019, ahead of the 74 UN General Assembly,  leaders of the developing and developed countries made commitments. New initiatives  have been designed to be scaled-up to deliver impact at the global scale needed. The Secretary-General urged governments, businesses and people everywhere to join the initiatives announced at the Summit, and promised to “keep pushing” for greater ambition and action. The Secretary-General committed the UN system to support implementation of plans presented at the Summit, with an initial report to be delivered at COP25 in Santiago, Chile.   What are exactly  the commitments? France announced that it would not enter into any trade agreement with countries that have policies counter to the Paris Agreement. Germany committed to carbon neutrality by 2050 12 countries  made financial commitments to the Green Climate Fund, the official financial mechanism to assist developing countries in adaptation and mitigation practices to counter climate change.  This is in addition to recent announcements from Norway, Germany, France and the United Kingdom who have recently doubled their present contributions. The United Kingdom made a major additional contribution, doubling its overall international climate finance to L11.6 billion for the period from 2020 to 2025 India pledged to increase renewable energy capacity to 175gw by 2022 and committed to further increasing to 450GW, and announced that 80 countries have joined the International Solar Alliance. China said it would cut emissions by over 12 billion tons annually, and would pursue a path of high quality growth and low carbon development. The European Union announced at least 25% of the next EU budget will be devoted to climate-related activities. The Russian Federation announced that they will ratify the Paris Agreement, bringing the total number of countries that have joined the Agreement to 187. Pakistan said it would plant more than 10 billion trees over the next five years. The private sector take the lead A group of the world’s largest asset-owners — responsible for directing more than $2 trillion in investments — committed to move to carbon-neutral investment portfolios by 2050. 87 major companies with a combined market capitalization of over US$ 2.3 trillion pledged to reduce emissions and align their businesses with what scientists say is needed to limit the worst impacts of climate change – a 1.5°C future. 130 banks – one-third of the global banking sector – signed up to align their businesses with the Paris agreement goals      For the Energy Efficiency Michael Bloomberg will increase the funding and geographic spread of his coal phase out efforts to 30 countries....

Read More
L’ Afrique, leader de la lutte contre les changements climatiques, pourrait-elle influencer les Etats-Unis?
Juil30

L’ Afrique, leader de la lutte contre les changements climatiques, pourrait-elle influencer les Etats-Unis?

L’ Afrique, leader de la lutte contre les changements climatiques, pourrait influencer les Etats-Unis EDITORIAL Par Houmi AHAMED-MIKIDACHE Alors que nous avons récemment remarqué que l’Amérique investit en Afrique dans le domaine environnemental, paradoxalement le pays du Président Donald Trump continue à nier l’existence des changements climatiques. Pourtant, les faits sont là : élévation de la mer, déplacement des populations, sécheresse et chaleur intenses sont fréquentes actuellement aux Etats-Unis, notamment en Californie, avec des pics de chaleurs évalués à 48, 9° Celsius  à Chino près de Los Angeles le 7 juillet dernier, d’après la météo nationale américaine. L’Amérique de Donald Trump vit la Canicule et ses conséquences  comme dans de nombreux pays  en ce moment, et pourtant le gouvernement américain a toujours  l’intention de se retirer   de l’Accord de Paris. Era Environnement, ce mois-ci, vous donnera des explications sur les différentes stratégies des pays d’Afrique pour mettre le climat, l’économie verte et bleue au centre des préoccupations  géostratégiques. Cela pourrait-il impulser sur la décision finale des Etats-Unis dans quelques années ?  A Suivre....

Read More
World Environment day: ” We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba
Juin05

World Environment day: ” We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba

World Environment day: “We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba*   On World Environment Day, there are plenty of words spoken about the obvious damage being wreaked by climate change – the chaos of hurricanes, wild fires and melting polar ice caps is there for all to see. But there’s another more hidden casualty of this new world of rising temperatures, drought, and increased natural disasters:  the education of our young people. At the simplest level, the wilder weather that we’re already seeing means children are prevented from getting to school. Hurricanes Irma and Harvey meant 1.7 millionUS students were temporarily unable to go to school last year – and officials in Puerto Rico have also recently announced plans to close over 280 schools following the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria. “Climate change is compounding educational inequalities that already exist” In wealthier nations, the damage caused by the increasing occurrence of extreme weather events more often than not tends to cause temporary disruption to children’s education.  But in poorer countries, the consequences can be far more long lasting. Buildings and infrastructure can take months or years to rebuild, with devastating implications for learning. Girls are most likely to be taken out of school in the wake of climate-related shocks, as was found in studies in Pakistan and Uganda after natural disasters there. So, indirectly, climate change is compounding educational inequalities that already exist. But the hardest hit parts of the world are those where universal education is still denied millions and Sub-Saharan Africa is on the front lines. Adult literacyrates are around 65%, compared to a global average of 86%. Here, over a fifth of childrenaged 6-11 are out of school, and a third of those aged 12-14. In Rwanda, we know the devastating impact of being forced from one’s home can have on a child’s education. But the big refugee crises of the future will not just be driven by war, but by the environment, with experts warning tens of millionsare likely to be displaced in the next decade by droughts and crop failures brought about by climate change.  What’s more, rising temperatures are predicted to result in the spread of lethal diseases. It is thought that a 2°C rise in temperatures could lead to an additional 40-60 million people in Africa being exposed to malaria. The disease is already one of the most significant factors in student absenteeism on the continent, with estimates ranging from 13 – 50%depending on the region.  Environmental changes are diminishing children’s education in other ways too. Malnourishmentdirectly affects children’s ability to learn. The World Food Programme has identified hunger and malnutrition as one of the most significant impacts of...

Read More
COP 23: Au fond de l’eau
Nov16

COP 23: Au fond de l’eau

COP 23: Au fond de l’eau   La conférence des Nations Unies sur les Changements  Climatiques présidée par les îles Fidji se poursuit. Les demandes restent les mêmes et sont discutées à travers le Dialogue  de Talanoa ( terme signifiant conversation) initié par les îles Fidji et organisé par des consultations informelles, alors que les chefs d’Etats et de gouvernement  s’expriment à Bonn. Résumé des travaux. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Ce que pensent  les îles Fidji Face au dialogue de Talanoa toujours en cours, les îles Fidji, premier Etat insulaire à présider la conférence des Nations Unies sur les Changements climatiques  reste positives. Mais, elles ont rappelé que  la question de la finance et le rôle du fonds d’adaptation font  l’objet de 12 articles à l’ordre du jour des  travaux de la mise en œuvre de l’Accord de Paris. «  Nous, en tant que présidence des Fidji, exprimons notre intérêt spécial de voir comment le fonds d’adaptation va servir l’Accord de Paris et des dialogues sont en cours sur le financement des 100 milliards de dollars par an ( à partir de 2020), a déclaré lors d’une conférence de presse Nazhat Shameem Khan, l’ambassadeur des Fidji auprès des Nations Unies. Le président de la COP 23, le premier ministre Frank Bainimarama,  à quant à lui souligné que  l’Allemagne a  annoncé, à l’ouverture de la COP,  un financement de 50 millions d’euros à destination du fonds d’adaptation pour les pays les moins avancés. Quel est la position de l’Union Européenne? Cette semaine, l’Union Européenne se donne trois objectifs à atteindre  : accomplir les progrès sur l’atténuation, centrés les points mandatés du programme de travail de l’Accord de Paris et maintenir l’équilibre imprimés à l’accord. Mais quelles ont été les demandes de la société civile? A l’ouverture des négociations sur le climat, la société civile, au nom d’un groupe d’ONGs,  Third World Network, s’est manifestée lors de plusieurs conférences de presse pour une prise en compte des actions pré-2020  dans le cadre du protocole de Kyoto mis en application il y a vingt ans mais non ratifié par de nombreux pays dont les Etats-Unis d’Amérique. « On ne peut parler des actions post-2020, sans traiter des actions pré-2020 » à déclaré Mohammed Ado, de Christian Aids. Mardi, le Réseau Climat et Développement, représenté par Aissatou Diouf a exprimé ses inquiétudes face au déséquilibre des contributions nationales africaines. « La plupart des pays africains ont mis l’accent sur l’atténuation dans leur Contribution Prévue Déterminée Nationale, le volet adaptation ne doit pas être occulté : Il y a des soucis sur le financement aussi bien pour le fonds d’adaptation que pour le fonds vert. Le WWF international, quant à...

Read More
COP 23 : Les projets africains bénéficiaires du fonds vert
Oct09

COP 23 : Les projets africains bénéficiaires du fonds vert

COP 23 : Les projets africains bénéficiaires du fonds vert A quelques semaines de la Conférence des Nations Unies sur le climat, le fonds vert a tenu sa 18ème réunion. 11 projets et programmes ont été approuvés per le fonds, dont trois en Afrique : le Sénégal, l’Ethiopie et l’Egypte. A ce jour, une cinquantaine de projets a  été financée et approuvée par ce fonds destiné à aider les pays en développement à faire face aux changements climatiques. Présentation  des trois projets africains récemment approuvés. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache L’Ethiopie face à la sécheresse Le fonds vert des Nations Unies pour le Climat vient de faire un don de  45 millions de dollars à l’Ethiopie pour mettre en œuvre un projet d’approvisionnement d’eau potable, par l’utilisation de l’énergie solaire. Ce projet vise notamment à améliorer la gestion des terres en augmentant la recharge d’eau souterraine et le contenu nutritif des sols. Un million de personnes vulnérables aux changements climatiques vont bénéficier de ce projet : les femmes auront un rôle primordial.  En Ethiopie, 80%  de la population vit dans les milieux ruraux et les femmes contribuent principalement  au développement de l’agriculture. Mais les ressources issues de l’exploitation agricoles sont contrôlées par les hommes. Le projet soumis au fonds vert  a été présentée par le ministère éthiopien des finances avec le soutien  du Réseau de connaissance sur le climat et le développement ( CDKN).  D’après, le CDKN, cette initiative va aider l’Ethiopie à mettre en œuvre sa  contribution nationale présentée pendant la COP 21.  La contribution nationale de l’Ethiopie est l’une des plus ambitieuses et l’une des rares contributions nationales qui prônent la réduction de gaz à effet de serre  à,moins  2 degrès celsius, précise le CDKN, un réseau dirigé par une alliance d’organisations dont PricewaterhouseCoopers. Au secours des agriculteurs sénégalais 9,8 millions de dollars ont été accordés par le fonds vert pour un projet de renforcement de la résistance climatique du secteur des petits exploitants agricoles au Sénégal avec  l’appui du Programme alimentaire mondial (PAM) des Nations Unies, accrédité par le fonds vert pour la mise en œuvre du projet. Présenté comme l’un des principaux acteurs de l’innovation de la résilience face aux changements climatiques en faveur de la sécurité alimentaire, le Programme Alimentaire Mondial aide les petits exploitants agricoles à accéder aux informations climatiques, météorologiques et agricoles pertinentes et fiables. En Tanzanie et au Malawi, des petits exploitants agricoles prennent des décisions concernant la gestion des éventuelles sécheresses et inondations par le biais de la radio, d’envoi de SMS et de messages audio sur des téléphones mobiles. Le PAM dispense également des formations de vulgarisation agricole afin de mieux interpréter et diffuser...

Read More
Tabi Joda-Column: ” It is  time to reverse the trends!”
Juil30

Tabi Joda-Column: ” It is time to reverse the trends!”

Tabi Joda-Column: ” It is  time to reverse the trends!” In Nigeria, Ghana and Cameroon alone, 50 metric tons of plastic fragments food packages, straws and table water bottles and empty sachet water bags are drained into the Atlantic Ocean every day. But it is time to reverse the trends.  It is everyone’s responsibility not only governments to protect the planet.     Over the last ten years the amount of plastic bags produced and used worldwide surpass the amount produced and used during the whole of the 20th century. Regrettably, 50% of the plastic we use, we just use them once and throw away. If we can place in a heap the amount of plastic bags we throw away into the environment each year, it will stretch from earth to the moon and back twenty five times. Globally, more than one million plastic bags are used every minute and an average individual throws away approximately 185 kg of plastic waste per year. An average household dumps about 900kg of plastic waste in a year. Similarly, an approximate 500 billion plastic bags are used and 135 billion plastic water bottles are thrown away every year. Plastic waste accounts for around 10 percent of the total waste generated in households worldwide.   The disaster Risk!     Every piece of plastic in the ocean breaks down into segments such that pieces from a single liter of plastic bottle could end up on every beach throughout the world. Similarly, almost every farmland is partially covered by plastic. Apart from the harmful effects of plastic bags on animals, plants and aquatic life, the toxic chemical from plastic waste are harmful to the human body when absorbed. A study has shown that apart from Americans who have up to 93% of people tested positive for BPA (a plastic chemical), level of effect are even higher in other parts of the world especially Africa where recycling and waste management policies and orientations are low or even absent in most places. Other studies have shown that some of these compounds found in plastic have been known to alter human hormones or have other potential risk on human health.   Alongside the hazardous risks on human health, over one million sea birds and over 100,000 marine mammals are reportedly killed annually from toxins originating from plastic waste in our oceans. 44% of seabird species, 22% of cetaceans, 32% of sea turtle species and a growing list of fish species, crabs and prawns are killed by plastics or have their habitat altered by plastic in or around their bodies. Plastics also degrade soil quality leading to low crop productivity and consequently poverty,...

Read More