New toolkit launched to guide governments to drive economies through tourism
Juin24

New toolkit launched to guide governments to drive economies through tourism

New toolkit launched to guide governments to drive economies through tourism By Duncan Mboyah A new tool kit has been launched to guide African governments to drive their economies through tourism. The tool kit will guide protected area authorities to attract new international investment to fund national parks while also conserving environments and providing socio-economic benefits. “The kit provide models on protected areas in Africa and gives predicted revenue increases of between four and eleven times within a decade,” Dr. Lauren Evans, Director of Conservation Science at Space for Giants notes during the launched in the sidelines of the summit on wildlife conservation in Zimbabwe.Dr. Evans observes that Africa’s unique diversity of wildlife and habitat has the potential to radically transform the continent’s economy. She says that it is encouraging that a few state protected areas are meeting their potential as engines for growth and presents a major opportunity for governments. “Cared for and sustainably developed, these are national assets that can provide significant financial and social returns now and long into the future,” she adds. Bringing new private sector investment Presenting a paper, Building a Wildlife Economy: Developing Nature-Based Tourism in African State Protected Areas, Dr. Evans notes that national parks and other state-owned conservation areas could significantly multiply the revenue they pump into African economies. The paper says that bringing new private-sector investment to underfunded protected areas to capitalize on surging interest in nature-based tourism would help fund conservation without draining state finances, while driving sustainable local and national development. Oliver Poole, executive director of the Giants Club, says that the paper details not only the boost to an African country’s economy that comes from developing tourism to its national parks in a sustainable way, but also the steps that governments can best take to secure that share of the tourism market. “If governments implement the toolkit laid out in this report they will not only help secure the long-term future of their wildlife and the landscapes they rely on but also will draw on foreign investment, create jobs and raise the GDP of their nation,” he adds. The authors notes that four of every five tourists to sub-Saharan Africa visits to view wildlife while the number of tourists is set to double to 134m by 2030. Sustainable Tourism creates jobs Tourism already drives 8.5 percent of Africa’s GDP and provides 24 million jobs while spending on tourism, hospitality and recreation could double to more than $260 billion by 2030. They however called for urgent improvement of the economy and ecological value to save wildlife and landscapes that are under a cute threat. The paper states found out that some...

Read More
Journée internationale de la biodiversité
Mai23

Journée internationale de la biodiversité

Journée internationale de la biodiversité    Par Era Environnement Alimentation, Agriculture et Forêts  La journée internationale de la biodiversité est célébrée tous les ans le 22 mai. Mais que  représente cette journée  dans le monde? Des données  issues du récent rapport  de la Plateforme intergouvernementale scientifique et politique sur la biodiversité et les services écosystémiques (IPBES) rappellent  les différentes problématiques liées à l’alimentation, l’agriculture et les forêts dans le monde. 75 % de l’environnement terrestre ont déjà été ” gravement altérés ” par les activités humaines. Il y a eu une augmentation de 300% de la production agricole depuis 1970, pourtant 11% de la population mondiale est sous-alimentée et environ 860 millions de personnes sont confrontées à l’insécurité alimentaire en Afrique et en Asie seulement. Environ un tiers de la surface terrestre mondiale et 75 % des ressources en eau douce sont consacrées à la production végétale ou animale. De 1980 à 2000, 100 millions d’hectares de forêt tropicale ont été perdus, principalement à cause de l’élevage du bétail en Amérique latine (environ 42 millions d’hectares) et des plantations en Asie du Sud-Est (environ 7,5 millions d’hectares, dont 80% pour l’huile de palme, utilisée principalement pour l’alimentation, les cosmétiques, les produits de nettoyage et les combustibles). 23 % des terres ont vu leur productivité diminuer en raison de la dégradation des terres, ce qui pourrait être atténué si l’on adoptait davantage des pratiques agricoles agroécologiques et restauratrices. Pendant ce temps, 75% des types de cultures vivrières dans le monde dépendent de la pollinisation animale. Le risque: la perte d’ environ 235 à 577 milliards de dollars US par an de la production mondiale de cultures. Comment réorienter le financement pour une agriculture intelligente? D’après le rapport de l’IPBES, en 2015, environ 100 milliards de dollars d’aide financière dans les pays de l’OCDE sont allés à l’agriculture qui est selon ces experts potentiellement nuisible pour l’environnement. D’après les auteurs du rapport,  près d’un tiers de la superficie forestière mondiale a été perdu par rapport aux niveaux préindustriels.  Environ 25 % des émissions de gaz à effet de serre sont dues au défrichement, à la production végétale et à la fertilisation, les aliments d’origine animale contribuant pour 75 % à ce chiffre.  5,6 gigatonnes d’émissions de CO2 sont séquestrées dans les écosystèmes marins et terrestres chaque année, ce qui équivaut à 60 % des émissions mondiales de combustibles fossiles. Paradoxalement, les petites exploitations contribuent au maintien d’une riche biodiversité, tout en contribuant aussi davantage, par hectare, à la production agricole et à l’approvisionnement alimentaire mondial comparées aux grandes exploitations : +/-30 % : la production végétale mondiale et l’approvisionnement alimentaire mondial sont assurés par de petites exploitations agricoles (<2...

Read More
Comorians Coastal areas, after Cyclone Kenneth
Mai10

Comorians Coastal areas, after Cyclone Kenneth

Comorian Coastal areas, after Cyclone Kenneth   In Comoros, 7 people died  and  19,300 people were displaced because of   the tropical Cyclone Kenneth happened  from Wednesday  24th to Thusday 25 th of April. Most of the agriculture and coastal areas  were affected by the strongest tropical cyclone of the archipelago’s history.  The risk of water-borne diseases has increased in Comoros countries due to damage to water and sanitation infrastructure, acccording to United Nations Office for the Coordination for Human Affairs (OCHA). Six health facilities were reportedly impacted, including the El-Maarouf National Hospital Centre, two regional hospitals in Foumbouni and Mitsamiouli ( Grande Comore, ), two health posts in Mkazi and Tsinimoichongo ( Grande Comore)as well as a health centre in Nioumachoua  ( Moheli) , according to a rapid assessment conducted on 26 April and confirmed by World Health Organization. Known as one of the best  places to visit in Comoros, Mitsamiouli has seen  part of its infrastructures, trees, and homes destroyed  by the cyclone. Report by Houmi Ahamed -Mikidache     Mitsmiamiouli, northern Comoros Saturday April 27, Roukia, 28 years old, is sitting in the public bus,  the “taxi brousse”  in Gare du Nord in Moroni ( the capital of Comoros). Gare du Nord is the place where she used to take the bus after working many hours as a laboratory technician in hospital El Maarouf, the national hospital of Comoros. For the first time since the Cyclone came to Comoros, she can go to her mom’s place in Mitsamiouli. ” Everyone is safe, except the house, the roof disappeared,” she said.  The bus leaves Moroni. Roukia is looking around. It’s been three days since the Cyclone came to Comoros.  She could not come to her mom’s place before. “The roads were blocked by fallen trees, “she explained. She looks to the windows of the bus. ” This is first time I saw all these trees fallen in the street on my way to my mom’s place, ” she added. The bus passed through many localities which have been damaged by the storm. Finally, one hour later,  Roukia arrived in Mitsamiouli. Fishermen are sitting behind the sea. Mitsamiouli is one the towns in the north of Grande Comore which has been hardly demolished by the cyclone.    Listen to the interview of Shabaan Mohamed Mfwaraya in Comorian and French.       Comores The Fishermen in Mitsamiouli Fisherman Shabaane Mohamed Mfwaraya is  standing behind the sea with others fishermen, in the center of Mitsamiouli, in the north of  Grande Comore.   This  experienced fisherman said people in his town did not believe the cyclone will come. ” We were informed earlier by the Civil Security...

Read More
News in brief
Mai09

News in brief

News in brief By Era Environnement A workshop on Fall Armyworm to be held in Zimbabwe The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture and the Department of Research and Specialist Services, Ministry of Lands, Agriculture, Water, Climate and Rural Resettlement, are jointly organising a fall armyworm (FAW )Compact Country Inception Workshop on 20-22 May 2019 in Harare, Zimbabwe. Key participants to the workshop will include national partners involved in agricultural research and extension, the academia, agro-input suppliers (agrochemical and seed industry), CGIAR centers, FAO, CABI, development partners, NGOs, and farmer associations.  According to the organizers, the overall objective of this workshop will be to formulate a comprehensive and sustainable country FAW response strategy taking into account experiences from end of 2016 to date as well as parallel initiatives by FAO, CABI, CIMMYT, USAID and other partners. The fall armyworm (FAW) Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) is unarguably one of the most damaging insect pests to be introduced to Africa in the 21st century. Its spread throughout sub-Saharan Africa has been very rapid owing to the ideal climate, lack of a resting stage, wide host range and varying host plant phenologies. IEAA to brief on Sterile Insect Technique in Senegal On May 9th, the International Atomic Energy Agency ( IAEA) will be briefing  on the success of the Sterile Insect Technique in increasing agricultural productivity and boosting income in Senegal. The United States is the exclusive funder of a nearly $5 million IAEA Peaceful Uses Initiative (PUI) project, “Contributing to Agricultural Development in West Africa through the Control of Tsetse Flies and Trypanosomosis,” having contributed $4,993,367 to this project since its inception in 2010. The project aims to eradicate the tsetse population (Glossina palpalis gambiensis) from the Niayes region, northeast of Dakar using the IAEA’s Sterile Insect Technique (SIT).  The tsetse fly population is now approaching confirmed eradication and the project has had significant positive socioeconomic benefits on farmers in the region. High Level Workshop: 16-18 May 2019-Pretoria, South Africa A High Level workshop organized by the International Seabed Authority ( ISA) and the Government of the Republic of South will be held on 16-May 2019  . Held over three days, this workshop aims to foster international and regional cooperation to promote the sustainable development of Africa’s deep seabed resources in support of Africa’s Blue Economy. The workshop will bring together key stakeholders including official representatives of Angola, Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, South Africa and Zambia; as well as African experts on the law of the sea and mining...

Read More
Creating jobs in the blue economy in the Gambia: the solutions for the migration problems- Interview
Mar06

Creating jobs in the blue economy in the Gambia: the solutions for the migration problems- Interview

Creating jobs in the blue economy in the Gambia: the solutions for the migration problems -Interview The Gambia wants to integrate its youth in different sectors of  blue economy. With their national  development plan, this country located in west Africa, has two strategies for fisheries. The Ministry of Fisheries, Water Resources and National Assembly, James Furmos Peter Gomez  was in Nairobi ( Kenya) at the end of November  2018 for the first Global Blue Economy Conference held in Africa. Listen to this  interview below by Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache       InterviewministredespêchesdelaGambie...

Read More
Le droit foncier: une réelle problématique aux Comores
Mar03

Le droit foncier: une réelle problématique aux Comores

Le droit foncier: une réelle problématique aux Comores   A Samba M’bodoni,  un village situé  dans la région d’Itsandra au nord de la Grande Comore,  plus précisément  entre les villes de  Ntsoudjini et Dzahani II, il  existe plusieurs problématiques reliant le partage des terres découlant de l’héritage maternel et paternel.  Présentation.   Par Asdjad Abdouroihamane ( stagiaire) avec ERA ENVIRONNEMENT Ngazidja (Grande Comore)  est une des quatre îles de l’Union des Comores. Comme dans toutes ces îles, il y a de  nombreuses querelles  liées à la répartition des terres découlant du droit foncier, l’étude des règles qui régissent la gestion des terres. A Samba M’bodoni,  un village situé  dans la région d’Itsandra plus précisément  entre Ntsoudjini et Dzahani II, il existe plusieurs problématiques reliant le partage des terres issu de l’héritage maternel et paternel. Dans ce village aux Comores, les terres paraissent fertiles. Mais, elles sont victimes des changements climatiques. Ces terres ont jadis fait l’objet d’un développement de cultures de rente : Vanille, Ylang Ylang, Girofle. En ce moment, la végétation  est abondante. Il pleut beaucoup en ce moment.   Il est intéressant de se familiariser avec la nature (la flore en particulier) et de comprendre son fonctionnement et ses changements. Mariage coutumier et protection des terres Comme dans toute la Grande Comore, le quotidien tourne autour du Anda, le grand mariage. Ce mariage coutumier est le point d’ancrage des Comores. Il est mis en exergue par les biens matériels liés au droit foncier. Mais ce droit foncier n’est pas forcément respecté dans le pays, parce qu’il engendre plusieurs aspects juridiques: le droit musulman, le droit coutumier, le droit découlant des pratiques de la colonisation. Et ces nombreux droits sont difficiles à suivre dans un pays où le citoyen lambda n’est pas intéressé par l’écrit, mais plutôt par l’oral. Pourtant, le mariage coutumier ne peut se faire en Grande Comore comme dans toutes les îles sans la construction d’une maison.  La propriété immobilière est nécessaire à la célébration du mariage coutumier. Mais cette propriété immobilière où plutôt l’accès à la construction pose question dans la mesure où le droit foncier n’est pas légiféré réellement aux Comores. Que représente la terre aux Comores? La terre est « source de vie ». Elle crée la richesse dans la mesure où elle est bien exploitée. Le manyahuli est un terme comorien signifant la transmission des biens par les femmes.  Ce  sont les femmes les propriétaires des biens.Les terres sont transmises aux filles de la famille. Celles-ci doivent les transmettre à leur tour à leurs filles.   La problématique se pose lorsqu’une femme n’a malheureusement pas eu de filles.  Qu’en est-il de l’ héritage légué par une femme à un homme? Comment...

Read More