New toolkit launched to guide governments to drive economies through tourism
Juin24

New toolkit launched to guide governments to drive economies through tourism

New toolkit launched to guide governments to drive economies through tourism By Duncan Mboyah A new tool kit has been launched to guide African governments to drive their economies through tourism. The tool kit will guide protected area authorities to attract new international investment to fund national parks while also conserving environments and providing socio-economic benefits. “The kit provide models on protected areas in Africa and gives predicted revenue increases of between four and eleven times within a decade,” Dr. Lauren Evans, Director of Conservation Science at Space for Giants notes during the launched in the sidelines of the summit on wildlife conservation in Zimbabwe.Dr. Evans observes that Africa’s unique diversity of wildlife and habitat has the potential to radically transform the continent’s economy. She says that it is encouraging that a few state protected areas are meeting their potential as engines for growth and presents a major opportunity for governments. “Cared for and sustainably developed, these are national assets that can provide significant financial and social returns now and long into the future,” she adds. Bringing new private sector investment Presenting a paper, Building a Wildlife Economy: Developing Nature-Based Tourism in African State Protected Areas, Dr. Evans notes that national parks and other state-owned conservation areas could significantly multiply the revenue they pump into African economies. The paper says that bringing new private-sector investment to underfunded protected areas to capitalize on surging interest in nature-based tourism would help fund conservation without draining state finances, while driving sustainable local and national development. Oliver Poole, executive director of the Giants Club, says that the paper details not only the boost to an African country’s economy that comes from developing tourism to its national parks in a sustainable way, but also the steps that governments can best take to secure that share of the tourism market. “If governments implement the toolkit laid out in this report they will not only help secure the long-term future of their wildlife and the landscapes they rely on but also will draw on foreign investment, create jobs and raise the GDP of their nation,” he adds. The authors notes that four of every five tourists to sub-Saharan Africa visits to view wildlife while the number of tourists is set to double to 134m by 2030. Sustainable Tourism creates jobs Tourism already drives 8.5 percent of Africa’s GDP and provides 24 million jobs while spending on tourism, hospitality and recreation could double to more than $260 billion by 2030. They however called for urgent improvement of the economy and ecological value to save wildlife and landscapes that are under a cute threat. The paper states found out that some...

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“Young African Scientists are engaging to make Africa Disaster Resilient Ready!” MARYANNE MURIUKI
Juin03

“Young African Scientists are engaging to make Africa Disaster Resilient Ready!” MARYANNE MURIUKI

“Young African Scientists are engaging to make Africa Disaster Resilient Ready! “ MARYANNE MURIUKI   Last may,  15 young scientists from Tunisia, Morocco, South Africa, Central African Republic, Madagascar, Kenya, Tanzania, Cameroun, Congo, Uganda, Burundi, Ghana, Nigeria, Ivory Coast,   and South Sudan have been selected by the African Union to be part of the African Youth Advisory board in Nairobi with the aim to  facilitate the implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 which is  a 15-year, voluntary, non-binding agreement which recognizes that the State has the primary role to reduce disaster risk. Maryanne  Muriuki, a 28 years old young woman from Nyandarua County in the Central Province in  Kenya was among these 15 young scientists. She was recently interviewed by Era Environnement.   ERA ENVIRONNEMENT:  How were these 15 young scientists of the African Youth Advisory board selected? MARYANNE MURIUKI:  The board comprises of 15 young people between 18 and 35 years. We all come from various disciplines, but all our efforts are towards Disaster Risk Reduction. We also represent various disciplines, including academia, the private sector, civil society, and government. We also represent all the regions of Africa, East, West, Southern, Northern and Central. We are a total of 7 women on the Board! All of us are passionate and are involved in the implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR 2015-2030), and closer home, are in alignment with the AU Programme of Action (PoA). ERA ENVIRONNEMENT: How this board will enhance the capacity building of African youth on their activities related to the prevention of natural disasters? MARYANNE MURIUKI: This is a good question. African Youth Advisory Board-Disaster Risk Reduction will organise capacity building workshops in collaboration with the African Union Commission (AUC), Regional Economic Communities (RECs) and other relevant institutions centred on the four  priorities of action Sendai Framework for African Union Youth and Young Politicians. We will also leverage on electronic and non-electronic platforms to share capacity building information on Disaster Risk Reduction. Already, we have engaged quite a number of African youth in Disaster Risk Reduction through our social media platforms. African Youth Advisory Board-Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) will also facilitate intergenerational capacity building in Disaster Risk Reduction between youth practitioners and experienced Disaster Risk Reduction practitioners at different levels of engagement. Finally, the Board will create avenues for the interaction of youth and youth organisations in DRR with related disciplines such as Climate Change, Urbanisation and Sustainable Development for cross discipline building of capacities. ERA ENVIRONNEMENT:  What was the outcome of the meeting in Nairobi ? MARYANNE MURIUKI:  We have set targets for the coming six months, basing on the four priorities for Action: Understanding disaster risk, Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk,...

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UNFCCC: In Preparation for COP 25
Juin02

UNFCCC: In Preparation for COP 25

UNFCCC: In Preparation for COP 25   By ERA ENVIRONNEMENT with UNFCCC The 50th session of the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA 50) and the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI 50) will be held in Bonn,  Germany, from 17-27 June 2019, in preparation for COP 25. The Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice is one of two permanent subsidiary bodies to the Convention established by the Conference of the Parties /Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris.  It supports the work of these bodies through the provision of timely information and advice on scientific and technological matters as they relate to the UNFCC, its Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreeement. Vulnerability and Adaptation among the discussion This year, the technical  discussion will be about vulnerability, and adaptation to climate change, science and review with research and observation of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 °C. Also up for discussion are methodological issues under the Convention, including a training programme for review experts for the technical review of greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories of Annex I Parties* to the Convention (developed countries). Under methodological issues under the Kyoto Protocol, SBSTA 50 will address: land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF); and implications of including reforestation of lands with forest in exhaustion as afforestation and reforestation clean development mechanism (CDM) project activities. Keys to achieve NDCs Regarding methodological issues under the Paris Agreement, SBSTA 50 has on its agenda issues related to, inter alia, reporting of information: on anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of GHGs; to track progress made in implementing and achieving Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs); and on financial, technology development and transfer and capacity-building support. On matters relating to Article 6 (cooperative approaches) of the Paris Agreement, the SBSTA will address: guidance on cooperative approaches; rules, modalities and procedures for the mechanism established by Article 6; and the work programme under the framework for non-market approaches. The SBSTA will also discuss market and non-market mechanisms under the Convention, including a framework for various approaches, non-market-based approaches, and a new market-based mechanism. SBI 50 will include: a multilateral assessment working group session under the international assessment and review (IAR) process; and a facilitative sharing of views under the international consultation and analysis (ICA) process. How the SBI will work? The SBI will address issues related to reporting from and review of Annex I Parties, including, inter alia: status of submission and review of seventh national communications and third BRs; compilations and syntheses of second and third BRs; the report on national GHG inventory...

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Changements Climatiques: Le Japon et l’Autriche soutiennent  le secteur privé en Afrique
Juin02

Changements Climatiques: Le Japon et l’Autriche soutiennent le secteur privé en Afrique

Changements Climatiques: le Japon et l’Autriche soutiennent le secteur privé en Afrique Par Era Environnement   Le Japon et le l’Autriche ont approuvé un million de dollars  pour renforcer la participation du secteur privé dans la lutte contre les changements climatiques en Afrique. Ce financement passera par le service du don de l’Assistance au Secteur privé en Afrique ( Fund For African Private Sector Assistance en anglais). Son objectif: étendre le rôle du secteur privé dans les contributions nationales déterminées des pays africains. Parties intégrantes de l’Accord de Paris, les contributions nationales sont des efforts nationaux des pays signataires de l’accord de Paris pour réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Aider à la mise en oeuvre des contributions nationales Le département des Changements Climatiques et de la Croissance Verte de la Banque Africaine de Développement mettra en oeuvre ce projet. De fait, le secteur privé africain pourra améliorer  des mesures d’intégration sur les changements climatiques dans les décisions d’investissements dans six pays : l’Egypte, l’Angola, le Mozambique, le Maroc, le Nigeria et l’Afrique du Sud. Ambitions: contribuer à la croissance économique verte et inclusive dans ces pays. Autres ambitions: renforcer les capacités des développeurs de projets et les parrainer en les aidant à augmenter les investissements verts dans le cadre des contributions nationales.  Le projet abordera les contraintes financières pour accéder au financement climat, y compris le manque de connaissance de l’entreprise et l’insuffisance de capacité à préparer des projets bancables.  En quoi consiste le FAPA ? Le FAPA est un appui financier  de partenaires de  la Banque Africaine de Développement. Il  fournit des dons permettant une assistance technique en  Afrique. Le gouvernement du Japon et de l’Autriche  contribuent activement dans le financement de ce fonds. A ce jour, environ 79 projets  dans 38 pays d’Afrique ont été financés  à travers ce fonds. Le FAPA vise à la fois des projets nationaux et régionaux, qui améliorent l’environnement des affaires, renforcent les systèmes financiers, construisent les infrastructures, promeuvent le commerce extérieur, et développent les petites et moyennes entreprises....

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Botswana responds to improving food insecurity caused by poor rains
Mai30

Botswana responds to improving food insecurity caused by poor rains

Botswana responds to improving food insecurity caused by poor rains Meekaeel Siphambili Gaborone, Botswana- May, 30 2019     The Botswana Ministry of Agricultural Development and Food Security is responding to food insecurity caused by poor rains and the devastating fall armyworm which has attacked some of the country’s regions last april. The government aided by the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation and the Japanese government has launched an emergency response to improving food and nutrition insecurity caused by climate change and promoting sound pest and pesticide management. The Japanese government awarded the Botswana government a grant of 500 thousand US Dollars to strengthen the country’s agricultural sector through awareness, surveillance and early warning, impact assessment and sustainable management and coordination. Helping food security The pest and pesticide management launch follows the recent regional level launching which was on 19 February 2019 in Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe. The launch came after the fall army worm was identified in 2017 in the Kweneng district, 70 to 80 kilometers west of the capital city of Gaborone. According to the country’s agricultural ministry, the fall armyworm has now spread to other districts. Patrick Ralotsia, Minister of Agricultural Development and Food Security says the agricultural sector in Botswana has been hard hit by this pest which is destructive to maize and sorghum. “The fall armyworm has greatly affected the livelihoods of farmers in Botswana resulting in low yield and financial losses. If not urgently controlled, the fall armyworm will detrimentally affect crop production resulting in the country being food insecure. The food insecurity will contribute to the food bill increasing significantly,” says Patrick Ralotsia. He said the outbreaks of pests like the fall armyworm represent a major obstacle to increased cereal production, food and nutrition security in Botswana and it is a challenge that has to be urgently addressed to improve agricultural production. Food security, nutrition security, employment opportunities,   economic development, trade and increased resilience to shocks and challenges are alleged to be what Botswana is increasing facing according to the minister. Understanding the disease in agriculture “The fall armyworm is new in Botswana and one of the key challenges farmers face is the lack of awareness and information. Effective dissemination of information of information on this pest is of paramount importance. Commercial chemical pesticides alone pose health risks to build up of pesticides resistance and higher economic losses,” says Minister of Agricultural Development and Food Security. Patrick Ralotsia says misinformed usage of chemical pesticides could result in the killing of potential indigenous natural enemies of the fall armyworm and other pests. The damages caused by fall armyworm and the use of pesticides...

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Comment reconstruire Maweni ya Mbude
Mai10

Comment reconstruire Maweni ya Mbude

Comment reconstruire Maweni ya Mbude   Deux jours après le passage du  cyclone Kenneth, ERA ENVIRONNEMENT s’est rendue à Maweni ya Mbudé ou Maoueni Mboudé, une localité située au nord de la Grande Comore, près d’un autre village agricole Ivembéni. Reconstruire ce village   est la priorité des agronomes. Comment ? Que représente Maweni ya Mbudé à la Grande Comore? Cette localité est l’une des  six localités exploitant la forêt de la Grille, une forêt claire et humide de moyenne altitude où est pratiquée l’agroforesterie. Les agriculteurs y cultivent le taro, le manioc, la patate douce et la banane. A noter que 80% des cultures vivrières des Comores sont destinés à l’autoconsommation. La banane est le produit de l’agriculture locale le plus consommé aux Comores. Les bananes sont le quatrième aliment de base mondial derrière le riz, le blé et le maïs, selon l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’Alimentation et l’Agriculture (FAO). D’après la FAO, la production annuelle en 2013 était  estimée à quelque 107 millions de tonnes, avec seulement 16 millions de tonnes destinées au marché international, pour une valeur de près de 9 milliards de dollars.  A Maweni Ya Mbudé, le cyclone Kenneth a détruit toutes les bananeraies. Or, les Comores sont connues pour leur diversité de  bananes. Problème:  la destruction des bananeraies  par le cyclone remet en question la durabilité de cette ressource agricole. L’agriculture aux Comores est victime des très fortes chaleurs, d’une pluviométrie intense et variable, d’espèces envahissantes, d’une baisse de la biodiversité en lien avec l’évolution du climat. Selon la seconde communication nationale sur les changements climatiques éditée en 2012, les cyclones et leur violence aggravée entraîneraient une diminution du rendement et pénaliseraient les familles des producteurs. Atoumani Moilim, Ingénieur Agronome, ancien étudiant à Dakar au Sénégal, diplômé d’un master en gestion de la fertilité du sol donne son avis sur la question et apporte ses solutions. Ecoutez       AtoumaniMoilim Propos recueillis par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Maweni Ya Mboudé Crédit photo: Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache...

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