L’ Afrique, leader de la lutte contre les changements climatiques, pourrait-elle influencer les Etats-Unis?
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L’ Afrique, leader de la lutte contre les changements climatiques, pourrait-elle influencer les Etats-Unis?

L’ Afrique, leader de la lutte contre les changements climatiques, pourrait influencer les Etats-Unis EDITORIAL Par Houmi AHAMED-MIKIDACHE Alors que nous avons récemment remarqué que l’Amérique investit en Afrique dans le domaine environnemental, paradoxalement le pays du Président Donald Trump continue à nier l’existence des changements climatiques. Pourtant, les faits sont là : élévation de la mer, déplacement des populations, sécheresse et chaleur intenses sont fréquentes actuellement aux Etats-Unis, notamment en Californie, avec des pics de chaleurs évalués à 48, 9° Celsius  à Chino près de Los Angeles le 7 juillet dernier, d’après la météo nationale américaine. L’Amérique de Donald Trump vit la Canicule et ses conséquences  comme dans de nombreux pays  en ce moment, et pourtant le gouvernement américain a toujours  l’intention de se retirer   de l’Accord de Paris. Era Environnement, ce mois-ci, vous donnera des explications sur les différentes stratégies des pays d’Afrique pour mettre le climat, l’économie verte et bleue au centre des préoccupations  géostratégiques. Cela pourrait-il impulser sur la décision finale des Etats-Unis dans quelques années ?  A Suivre....

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Investing in climate risk: the new strategy–Sovereign Wealth Funds
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Investing in climate risk: the new strategy–Sovereign Wealth Funds

  Investing in climate risk: the new strategy  -Sovereign Wealth Funds Six sovereign wealth funds which collectively represent more than USD 3 trillion in assets have committed to only invest in companies that factor climate risks into their strategies, thereby helping to achieve the climate goals of the Paris Agreement. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Given the size, long term investment horizons of sovereign wealth funds (SWFs), and the financial risks posed to SWFs should warming exceed 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, SWFs are in a unique position to both benefit from sustainable market outcomes and to accelerate the transition to a low carbon economy. The six funds are organized in the “One Planet Sovereign Wealth Fund Working Group,  established in December 2017 at the One Planet Summit in Paris, France. The working group consists of the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority, Kuwait Investment Authority, the New Zealand Superannuation Fund, Norges Bank Investment Management of Norway, the Public Investment Fund of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and the Qatar Investment Authority. In a joint statement from all 6 SWFs, they said that “By using the Framework, SWFs can reinforce their long-term value creation, improve their risk-return profile, and increase long-term portfolio resilience by factoring and integrating climate issues into their decision-making.” The framework The framework is based on three principals: alignment, ownership, and integration. Alignment of investment decisions with climate change conscientiousness includes the recommendation of public reporting on the alignment and the consideration that the financial risks from climate change may prevent SWFs from delivering the same returns in the future. The second principal of ownership encourages companies to take responsibility for climate change in their business strategy and planning, governance, and risk management. Companies are expected to understand the implications of their greenhouse gas emissions and take responsibility for reducing the emissions to levels agreed upon in the Paris Climate Agreement. SWFs are also encouraged in the framework to help companies understand the financial risks of climate change that the Paris Agreement seeks to address. Ownership also suggests that SWFs require companies to provide regular reporting of climate change related data according to the Greenhouse Gas Protocol and the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures. The third and final principal is the full integration of climate change related risk and investment opportunities into the SWF investment strategy. Funds should be managed according to the expected transition to a low carbon economy and include a focus on investment in climate change adaptation and mitigation to reduce investment risks. Climate change risk should also be considered in new investment decisions.  An investment that would increase greenhouse gas emissions and thus climate change will lead to greater risk in the...

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Nigeria-climate action : “We can all make a difference to climate change”- Olumide Idowu* 
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Nigeria-climate action : “We can all make a difference to climate change”- Olumide Idowu* 

Nigeria-climate action : “We can all make a difference to climate change”- Olumide Idowu*   Column   Changing our lifestyle It is easy to get disheartened or fearful about climate change. Climate change in Nigeria is principally a major problem caused by the increase of human activities if you like, call it human mismanagement of the earth leading to several direct and indirect impacts on health. These climatic changes have wide-range harmful effects including increase in heat-related mortality, dehydration, spread of infectious diseases, malnutrition, damage to public health infrastructure. If we continue as we are now, the effects of global warming around the world could be catastrophic. Some aspects of climate change may already be irreversible. Yet many scientists believe that by taking positive action now, it is possible to slow the pace of climate change and reduce further global warming. Changing our lifestyle and our behaviour will help reduce the human impact on the environment. We can all make a difference to climate change. Here are some suggestions for a healthier, more sustainable approach to living in our environment in Nigeria. Reduce Car Emissions: Leave the car in the garage and walk or cycle for short trips; Use public transport; Keep your car tyres inflated to the recommended pressure; Drive slowly and smoothly; Car-pool with workmates.   Reduce Energy Expenditure in your Home: Turn off lights and appliances when not in use; Replace regular light bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs; Insulate your home and reduce your heating and cooling bills; Install a water-saving showerhead and take shorter showers; Dry your clothes outside on the line rather than in the clothes dryer; Switch to ‘green energy’ for your electricity needs.   Reduce your ‘Carbon Footprint’ When you Shop: Buy local and seasonal food produce to reduce energy use in transport and storage; Buy items with minimal packaging whenever possible; If you buy new items, make sure they are made from sustainable, low-impact materials; Buy secondhand rather than new – from op shops, garage sales or over the Internet.   Recycle Waste and Reuse Pre-Loved Items: Recycle as much of your rubbish as you can; Compost vegetable scraps; ‘Detox your home’ – dispose of unwanted chemicals safely rather than pouring them down the sink or putting them in the rubbish bin; Be creative in finding new uses for ‘found’ or pre-loved objects.   Longer term choices that help the Environment: Buy energy efficient household appliances; Install a solar-powered hot water system; Install rainwater tanks; Buy a more fuel-efficient car or think about not owning a car – perhaps you can share one; Move to an area where your workplace, shops...

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Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa
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Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa

Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa   Some 800 delegates from 59 countries, including ministers and other high-level government and international officials, together with non-state delegates, offered their insights into the challenges and possible responses to climate change, and harvested those insights for consideration in the official international climate negotiation process. Explanation. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache with UNFCCC   The collecting of views – under the banner of the year-long Talanoa Dialogue launched at negotiations in Bonn, Germany, in November 2017 – was a key part of Africa Climate Week that just concluded in Nairobi (Kenya). During this Africa Climate Week, co-organized with the African Development Bank and member of the Nairobi Framework Partnership ( NFP), from 9th to 13th April in Nairobi ( Kenya), some 800 delegates from 59 countries, including ministers and other high level expressed their responses to the threat of climate change, and harvested other insights for consideration in the official international climate negotiations process.  Action on climate change and sustainable development together are the keys for the development of Africa. The Nairobi Framework Partnership (NFP) is celebrating this year its 10th anniversary, as is the Africa Carbon Forum, which was launched by NFP to spur investment in climate action through carbon markets, mechanisms and finance. The NFP members include: the African Development Bank, Asian Development Bank, International Emissions Trading Association, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), UNEP DTU Partnership, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, United Nations Development Programme, UN Climate Change, and World Bank Group. Cooperating organizations include: Africa Low Emission Development Partnership, Climate Markets and Investment Association, Development Bank of Latin America, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, Inter-American Development Bank, Latin American Energy Organization and West African Development Bank. What was their messages exactly? At the first regional Talanoa event since the launch in Bonn, delegates distilled their deliberations into key messages: Finance – Public finance must be instrumental in unlocking private finance Markets – Carbon markets are about doing more together, and doing more with less Energy – Energy is a high priority, affecting everything. Financial instruments should be put in place to de-risk investment and enhance involvement in smaller and medium-sized enterprises Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – Achieving the SDGs, including the climate one is the only way forward Technology – Businesses are ready to pick up new technology solutions, provided there is a good business case. The voice of the private sector is needed now more than ever. “We are engaged across most of the Sustainable Development Goals and clearly focusing on how to create synergy between the different goals and especially with the climate goal, which is...

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Era Environnement: Le retour/ The Comeback
Mar21

Era Environnement: Le retour/ The Comeback

Depuis, quelques mois, vous ne nous lisez plus. Mais, ne vous inquiétez pas, Era Environnement est pleine restructuration. Vous aurez prochainement le loisir de lire tous nos articles.   A bientôt Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Rédactrice en chef For the past few months, you did not have news from Era Environnement. We are undergoing a restructuring. But, do not worry, we will soon get back to you. See you soon. Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Editor in...

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UNFCCC: A new gate for the Talanoa Dialogue
Jan27

UNFCCC: A new gate for the Talanoa Dialogue

UNFCCC: A new gate for the Talanoa Dialogue The UN Climate Change secretariat launched yesterday a new portal to support the Talanoa Diaologue, an important international conversation in which countries will check progress and seek to increase global ambition to meet the goals of the Paris Climate Change Agreement. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   How will it work? Through the portal, all countries and other stakeholders, including business, investors, cities, regions and civil society, are invited to make submissions into the Talanoa Dialogue around three central questions: Where are we? Where do we want to go? How do we get there? Countries and non-Party stakeholders will be contributing ideas, recommendations and information that can assist the world in taking climate action to the next level in order to meet the objectives of the Paris Agreement and support the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The Talanoa Dialogue The Dialogue was launched at the UN Climate Change Conference COP23 in Bonn in November 2017 and will run throughout 2018. The Paris Agreement’s central goal is keep the global average temperature rise to below 2C degrees and as close as possible to 1.5C. Current global ambition to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to prepare societies to resist increasing climate change is not enough to achieve this under the current national climate action plans known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs). “The portal is the gateway for the Talanoa Dialogue. It represents the central point for everyone to make their views heard around enhanced ambition. Additionally, it will make available other key resources for the dialogue,” said Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change. “I very much welcome the portal because it provides transparency and broadens participation in the dialogue. I look forward to many governments and other actors making their submissions via the portal as part of world-wide efforts required for the next level of climate action and ambition”, she said. The Pacific island concept of ‘Talanoa’ was introduced by Fiji, which held the Presidency of the COP23 UN Climate Change Conference. It aims at an inclusive, participatory and transparent dialogue. The purpose of the concept is to share stories, build empathy and to make wise decisions for the collective good. The Talanoa method purposely avoids blame and criticism to create a safe space for the exchange of ideas and collective decision-making. The Talanoa Dialogue will be constructive, facilitative and oriented towards providing solutions and will see both technical and political exchanges....

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