G7 Summit: Business leaders call for climate action
Août22

G7 Summit: Business leaders call for climate action

G7 Summit: Business leaders call for climate action   By Era Environnement   In the lead-up to the G7 Summit in Biarritz, France, and two days before President Macron meets civil society in Paris, business leaders representing companies based in G7 countries  explained on a media briefing call on Aug. 21 why they are calling on G7 leaders to  make addressing climate change with speed and scale a critical G7 agenda item and  to commit to net-zero emissions by 2050. Participating companies have committed to ambitious climate action and call on their national governments to do the same. Companies  spoke to their efforts to align with the latest science on limiting global warming to 1.5°C degrees. Indeed, at  the end of july, twenty-eight companies with a total market capitalization of $1.3 trillion have  set up a new level of climate ambition in response to  a call-to-action campaign ahead of the UN Climate Action Summit on 23 September. The companies such as Unilever, Vodafone Group PLC and Zurich Insurance, amongst others  have committed themselves to more ambitious climate targets aligned with limiting global temperature rise to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and reaching net-zero emissions by no later than 2050. The commitments of the 28 companies heed the most recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which warned of catastrophic consequences should global warming exceed 1.5°C. “The UN Secretary-General has called on leaders to come to the Climate Action Summit in September with clear plans for major cuts to emissions on the pathway to a zero-net emissions economy by 2050,” said Ambassador Luis Alfonso de Alba, the UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for the Climate Action...

Read More
Wildlife experts meeting to enforce new rules in wildlife management
Juin24

Wildlife experts meeting to enforce new rules in wildlife management

Wildlife experts meeting to enforce new rules in wildlife management By Duncan Mboyah Wildlife experts in Zimbabwe’s Victoria Falls this week to enforce new rules in wildlife management. The summit that is being held from June 23 – 25, 2019 has been convened by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the African Union (AU) to radically change the way the continent’s nature-based economy is managed. “To save wildlife and preserve livelihoods, we must ensure that wild spaces remain a legitimate and competitive land-use option,” Joyce Msuya, Deputy Executive Director of UNEP said. Msuya noted that the there is urgent need to create a new and effective wildlife economy so as to ensure that they are used responsibly. A New led Africa-led vision The summit is a new, Africa-led vision of conservation that links the private sector with national authorities and local communities to design and finance conservation-compatible investments that deliver sustainable economic and ecological benefits to countries, people and the environment.   In Africa, businesses such as tourism, the harvesting of plants and natural products for food, cosmetics or medicines, wildlife credit schemes for direct payments for conservation, or fees, taxes and levies tied to the use of nature, employ millions of people and earn governments billions of dollars in revenue. “Africa has made significant headway in protecting natural spaces and conserving wildlife and ecosystems,” Josefa Correia Sacko, AU Commissioner for Rural Economy and Agriculture.   Sacko noted that it is time to boost economies through Africa-led public-private partnerships that place communities at the heart of investment, while taking into account the need to continue the conservation pathway.” Alongside commercial rewards, conserved habitats drive local, regional and global environmental benefits. According to UNEP and the World Conservation Monitoring Center the consumer spending on tourism, hospitality and recreation in Africa, estimated at $124 billion in 2015, is expected to reach $262 billion by 2030. They said that even as economies built on wildlife continue to grow, they must take into account economic, social and ecological sustainability. The African Wildlife Economy Initiative to be launched The summit is set to develop a road map to social sustainability that mainstreams local communities as co-investors in the nature-based economy. This will ensure that people living with nature must be at the center of transactions, and communities must be treated as equal partners, with their own conservation and development aspirations similarly valued alongside important interventions to conserve species. Emmerson Mnangagwa, President of Zimbabwe, will launch the African Wildlife Economy Initiative.   12 Ministerial delegations from Angola, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Gambia, Zambia, Chad and South Sudan are due to attend, as well as private sector...

Read More
UNFCCC: In Preparation for COP 25
Juin02

UNFCCC: In Preparation for COP 25

UNFCCC: In Preparation for COP 25   By ERA ENVIRONNEMENT with UNFCCC The 50th session of the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA 50) and the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI 50) will be held in Bonn,  Germany, from 17-27 June 2019, in preparation for COP 25. The Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice is one of two permanent subsidiary bodies to the Convention established by the Conference of the Parties /Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris.  It supports the work of these bodies through the provision of timely information and advice on scientific and technological matters as they relate to the UNFCC, its Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreeement. Vulnerability and Adaptation among the discussion This year, the technical  discussion will be about vulnerability, and adaptation to climate change, science and review with research and observation of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 °C. Also up for discussion are methodological issues under the Convention, including a training programme for review experts for the technical review of greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories of Annex I Parties* to the Convention (developed countries). Under methodological issues under the Kyoto Protocol, SBSTA 50 will address: land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF); and implications of including reforestation of lands with forest in exhaustion as afforestation and reforestation clean development mechanism (CDM) project activities. Keys to achieve NDCs Regarding methodological issues under the Paris Agreement, SBSTA 50 has on its agenda issues related to, inter alia, reporting of information: on anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of GHGs; to track progress made in implementing and achieving Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs); and on financial, technology development and transfer and capacity-building support. On matters relating to Article 6 (cooperative approaches) of the Paris Agreement, the SBSTA will address: guidance on cooperative approaches; rules, modalities and procedures for the mechanism established by Article 6; and the work programme under the framework for non-market approaches. The SBSTA will also discuss market and non-market mechanisms under the Convention, including a framework for various approaches, non-market-based approaches, and a new market-based mechanism. SBI 50 will include: a multilateral assessment working group session under the international assessment and review (IAR) process; and a facilitative sharing of views under the international consultation and analysis (ICA) process. How the SBI will work? The SBI will address issues related to reporting from and review of Annex I Parties, including, inter alia: status of submission and review of seventh national communications and third BRs; compilations and syntheses of second and third BRs; the report on national GHG inventory...

Read More
Changements Climatiques: Le Japon et l’Autriche soutiennent  le secteur privé en Afrique
Juin02

Changements Climatiques: Le Japon et l’Autriche soutiennent le secteur privé en Afrique

Changements Climatiques: le Japon et l’Autriche soutiennent le secteur privé en Afrique Par Era Environnement   Le Japon et le l’Autriche ont approuvé un million de dollars  pour renforcer la participation du secteur privé dans la lutte contre les changements climatiques en Afrique. Ce financement passera par le service du don de l’Assistance au Secteur privé en Afrique ( Fund For African Private Sector Assistance en anglais). Son objectif: étendre le rôle du secteur privé dans les contributions nationales déterminées des pays africains. Parties intégrantes de l’Accord de Paris, les contributions nationales sont des efforts nationaux des pays signataires de l’accord de Paris pour réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Aider à la mise en oeuvre des contributions nationales Le département des Changements Climatiques et de la Croissance Verte de la Banque Africaine de Développement mettra en oeuvre ce projet. De fait, le secteur privé africain pourra améliorer  des mesures d’intégration sur les changements climatiques dans les décisions d’investissements dans six pays : l’Egypte, l’Angola, le Mozambique, le Maroc, le Nigeria et l’Afrique du Sud. Ambitions: contribuer à la croissance économique verte et inclusive dans ces pays. Autres ambitions: renforcer les capacités des développeurs de projets et les parrainer en les aidant à augmenter les investissements verts dans le cadre des contributions nationales.  Le projet abordera les contraintes financières pour accéder au financement climat, y compris le manque de connaissance de l’entreprise et l’insuffisance de capacité à préparer des projets bancables.  En quoi consiste le FAPA ? Le FAPA est un appui financier  de partenaires de  la Banque Africaine de Développement. Il  fournit des dons permettant une assistance technique en  Afrique. Le gouvernement du Japon et de l’Autriche  contribuent activement dans le financement de ce fonds. A ce jour, environ 79 projets  dans 38 pays d’Afrique ont été financés  à travers ce fonds. Le FAPA vise à la fois des projets nationaux et régionaux, qui améliorent l’environnement des affaires, renforcent les systèmes financiers, construisent les infrastructures, promeuvent le commerce extérieur, et développent les petites et moyennes entreprises....

Read More
Journée internationale de la biodiversité
Mai23

Journée internationale de la biodiversité

Journée internationale de la biodiversité    Par Era Environnement Alimentation, Agriculture et Forêts  La journée internationale de la biodiversité est célébrée tous les ans le 22 mai. Mais que  représente cette journée  dans le monde? Des données  issues du récent rapport  de la Plateforme intergouvernementale scientifique et politique sur la biodiversité et les services écosystémiques (IPBES) rappellent  les différentes problématiques liées à l’alimentation, l’agriculture et les forêts dans le monde. 75 % de l’environnement terrestre ont déjà été ” gravement altérés ” par les activités humaines. Il y a eu une augmentation de 300% de la production agricole depuis 1970, pourtant 11% de la population mondiale est sous-alimentée et environ 860 millions de personnes sont confrontées à l’insécurité alimentaire en Afrique et en Asie seulement. Environ un tiers de la surface terrestre mondiale et 75 % des ressources en eau douce sont consacrées à la production végétale ou animale. De 1980 à 2000, 100 millions d’hectares de forêt tropicale ont été perdus, principalement à cause de l’élevage du bétail en Amérique latine (environ 42 millions d’hectares) et des plantations en Asie du Sud-Est (environ 7,5 millions d’hectares, dont 80% pour l’huile de palme, utilisée principalement pour l’alimentation, les cosmétiques, les produits de nettoyage et les combustibles). 23 % des terres ont vu leur productivité diminuer en raison de la dégradation des terres, ce qui pourrait être atténué si l’on adoptait davantage des pratiques agricoles agroécologiques et restauratrices. Pendant ce temps, 75% des types de cultures vivrières dans le monde dépendent de la pollinisation animale. Le risque: la perte d’ environ 235 à 577 milliards de dollars US par an de la production mondiale de cultures. Comment réorienter le financement pour une agriculture intelligente? D’après le rapport de l’IPBES, en 2015, environ 100 milliards de dollars d’aide financière dans les pays de l’OCDE sont allés à l’agriculture qui est selon ces experts potentiellement nuisible pour l’environnement. D’après les auteurs du rapport,  près d’un tiers de la superficie forestière mondiale a été perdu par rapport aux niveaux préindustriels.  Environ 25 % des émissions de gaz à effet de serre sont dues au défrichement, à la production végétale et à la fertilisation, les aliments d’origine animale contribuant pour 75 % à ce chiffre.  5,6 gigatonnes d’émissions de CO2 sont séquestrées dans les écosystèmes marins et terrestres chaque année, ce qui équivaut à 60 % des émissions mondiales de combustibles fossiles. Paradoxalement, les petites exploitations contribuent au maintien d’une riche biodiversité, tout en contribuant aussi davantage, par hectare, à la production agricole et à l’approvisionnement alimentaire mondial comparées aux grandes exploitations : +/-30 % : la production végétale mondiale et l’approvisionnement alimentaire mondial sont assurés par de petites exploitations agricoles (<2...

Read More
Comment reconstruire Maweni ya Mbude
Mai10

Comment reconstruire Maweni ya Mbude

Comment reconstruire Maweni ya Mbude   Deux jours après le passage du  cyclone Kenneth, ERA ENVIRONNEMENT s’est rendue à Maweni ya Mbudé ou Maoueni Mboudé, une localité située au nord de la Grande Comore, près d’un autre village agricole Ivembéni. Reconstruire ce village   est la priorité des agronomes. Comment ? Que représente Maweni ya Mbudé à la Grande Comore? Cette localité est l’une des  six localités exploitant la forêt de la Grille, une forêt claire et humide de moyenne altitude où est pratiquée l’agroforesterie. Les agriculteurs y cultivent le taro, le manioc, la patate douce et la banane. A noter que 80% des cultures vivrières des Comores sont destinés à l’autoconsommation. La banane est le produit de l’agriculture locale le plus consommé aux Comores. Les bananes sont le quatrième aliment de base mondial derrière le riz, le blé et le maïs, selon l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’Alimentation et l’Agriculture (FAO). D’après la FAO, la production annuelle en 2013 était  estimée à quelque 107 millions de tonnes, avec seulement 16 millions de tonnes destinées au marché international, pour une valeur de près de 9 milliards de dollars.  A Maweni Ya Mbudé, le cyclone Kenneth a détruit toutes les bananeraies. Or, les Comores sont connues pour leur diversité de  bananes. Problème:  la destruction des bananeraies  par le cyclone remet en question la durabilité de cette ressource agricole. L’agriculture aux Comores est victime des très fortes chaleurs, d’une pluviométrie intense et variable, d’espèces envahissantes, d’une baisse de la biodiversité en lien avec l’évolution du climat. Selon la seconde communication nationale sur les changements climatiques éditée en 2012, les cyclones et leur violence aggravée entraîneraient une diminution du rendement et pénaliseraient les familles des producteurs. Atoumani Moilim, Ingénieur Agronome, ancien étudiant à Dakar au Sénégal, diplômé d’un master en gestion de la fertilité du sol donne son avis sur la question et apporte ses solutions. Ecoutez       AtoumaniMoilim Propos recueillis par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Maweni Ya Mboudé Crédit photo: Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache...

Read More