Why man should care about the environment
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Why man should care about the environment

Why man should care about the environment By Olumide Idowu* A clean environment is essential for healthy living The more you don’t care about the environment, the more it will become polluted with contaminants and toxins that have a harmful impact on our health. Air pollution can cause respiratory diseases and cancer, among other problems. Water pollution can lead to typhoid, diarrheal diseases, and other ailments. The local authorities have to promote caring for the environment. Earth is warming For the sake of our children and our future, we must do more to combat climate change, adapt to its impact and mitigate its effects. Children yet unborn will appreciate it There is the need to look ahead into the future, there must be a realisation of the fact that there are attendant consequences if we waste and destroy natural resources, and unsustainably exhaust the land – instead of using it in a way that will increase its usefulness. So it is our duty to leave the Earth in a better state that we met for the unborn generation. Biodiversity is key Biological diversity or biodiversity refers to the variety of plants, animals, and other living things in our world. It can be negatively influenced by habitat loss and degradation due to human activity, climate change, and pollution, among other things. Planet earth is our home Until when technology makes it possible for human being to permanently reside in space or any other planet, the Earth for now is our home – it is where we live, so we had better take good care of it. For sure, we would be doing our world and ourselves a lot of good if we do the simplest things in our home or wherever we find ourselves to make this a reality. What can we do? The problems we are facing now are tough. However, the good news is that, you don’t have to be an expert or a millionaire to save the Planet – everyone can help to do their bit for the environment. In other words, if each of us can be more conscious of environmental issues and willing to take some simple steps to save the Planet, we can make a huge difference. Nowadays, with increasing environmental awareness among the public, people around the world are coming together to fight for a greener future, and the effort has been yielding great results. As a pioneering member of environmental advocacy community, Better World International, is always committed to improve and take care of our immediate environment, by providing practical tips to its members on the things they can do to live...

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Plastic pollution’s many side effects on the ecosystem
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Plastic pollution’s many side effects on the ecosystem

Plastic pollution’s many side effects on the ecosystem Meekaeel Siphambili Gaborone, Botswana: Apart from sustaining a rich diversity of natural ecosystems, the country’s water resources are critical for meeting the basic needs related to water supplies for domestic and industrial requirements, with the wildlife included. Mankind however, has turned out to be his own and the ecosystem’s worst enemy.   Mankind is the destroyer of the much needed water resources and in the process destroying many other animal species living in water and on the wetlands. The fauna and flora, the animal, bird and many other all suffer because of the dumping of construction concrete debris, used tires, and plastic and shop issued plastic carrier bags or any other garbage that is not needed. Plastic carrier bags that washed  into dams and lakes normally trap fish, frogs and other water living beings, eventually leading to their prematurely death. Efforts to sensitise the general public on the effects of plastic, debris or garbage falls on deaf ears and always regarded as ‘drivel garbage’. Plastic reduces the aesthetic value of the environment as they hang on trees and generally are widespread in the environment. Some bird species are alleged to die from being attached to plastics. The bird normal flies without stopping for the fear of the plastic attached to it, mostly on the legs. The bird then dies of exhaustion after flying without rest; ‘trying to flee from the plastic’ attached to it, the wind blowing against the plastic forces the bird to fly even harder. Dumping of concrete debris have changed or altered water ways, the plastic, especially the shop issued plastic bags, besides trapping or snaring the fish and birds are alleged to be hazardous to the ecosystem. Plastic is not biodegradable hence once deposited in the soil it persists in the environment for a long period of time. The plastic have adverse impacts on human and animal health due to their impervious characteristic, they serve as a breeding place for mosquitoes and other vermin. Domestic animals like goats and cattle also feed on plastic and they disrupt the digestive process causing bloating and untimely death of animals. The Botswana Ministry of Environment, Natural Resources Conservation and Tourism has made several attempts to manage or control the proliferation of plastic carrier bags in the environment through various strategies such as public education and awareness on proper use of plastic carrier bags, recycling and minimization of its use. Water stress due to changed or altered water courses and with the aid of climate change has forced the wild animals to come closer to humans in search of water. “Since 2009...

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UN Climate Change Secretariat published an overview of the Katowice Climate Package
Fév19

UN Climate Change Secretariat published an overview of the Katowice Climate Package

                                UN Climate Change Secretariat published an overview of the Katowice Climate Package The secretariat of UN Climate Change has published an overview of the Katowice Climate Package, adopted at the UN Climate Change Conference COP24 in Katowice last December. Report by ERA ENVIRONNEMENT with UNFCCC The package constitutes the guidelines for the implementation of the Paris Climate Change Agreement. The guidelines establish an effective international system for promoting and tracking progress while empowering countries to build national systems for implementing the agreement. “The Katowice outcome is a breakthrough that all governments can be proud of! It strengthens the Paris Agreement and it opens the doors for the implementation of climate action across the globe,” Patricia Espinosa, the UN’s Climate Chief, underlined. For the UN Climate Secretariat, the guidelines respect the different capabilities and socio-economic realities of each country while providing the foundation for ever-increasing ambition with respect to climate action. The Katowice outcome is a complex package, achieved through in-depth technical discussions and political compromise and containing operational guidance on: the information about domestic mitigation and other climate goals and activities that governments will provide in their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs); how to communicate about efforts to adapt to climate impacts; the rules for functioning of the Transparency Framework, which will show to the world what countries are doing about climate change; establishment of a committee to facilitate implementation of the Paris Agreement and promote compliance with the obligations undertaken under the Agreement; how to conduct the Global Stocktake of overall progress towards the aims of the Paris Agreement; how to assess progress on the development and transfer of technology; how to provide advance information on financial support to developing countries and the process for establishing new targets on finance from 2025 onwards.  ...

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Climate Change: The challenges of Botswana
Fév18

Climate Change: The challenges of Botswana

Climate Change: The challenges of Botswana   By Meekaeel Siphambili Gaborone-Botswana   Ninety percent of the inhabitants of African countries rely on firewood or coal for cooking or domestic use. Most of the countries in Africa rely on coal fired power stations with many of the countries having no laws or regulations on engine emissions as most of the cars used do not meet the standards. The long term goal of the Paris Agreement is to reduce  greenhouse gases emissions. To materialize this, Africa has to make an effort to diversify its energy mix, and to create an enabling environment for the exploitation of renewable energy. The sunny days give room for the countries to tap or use mostly the solar generated power which can be installed anywhere. Several decisions relating to climate change were taken at the 23rd Conference of Parties held in Bonn, Germany; and these motivated countries to negotiate the finer details of how the Paris Agreement will work from 2020 onwards. COP24 also carried the same resolutions on climate change. The year 2020 of the implementation of the Paris Accord  is not far and the effects of climate change continue to show face across the continent. Climate Disasters According to the records, in the last decade, climate change has led to about US$2.5 trillion in disaster losses in developing countries. The number of people affected by natural disasters doubled from 102 million in 2015 to 204 million in 2016. Almost one third of the land is no longer fertile enough to grow food. More than 1.3 billion people live on this deteriorating agricultural land, putting them at risk of climate driven water shortages and depleted harvests. Droughts alone have affected more than 1 billion people in the last decade. Since 2001, droughts have wiped out enough produce to feed 81 million people every day for a year. In the SADC Region alone, the number of food insecure population is at 27 million. Between 2014 and 2016, the Region suffered the worst drought in 35 years, caused by the El Nino phenomenon, which left an estimated 41.4 Million of the population in need of food aid. Botswana has not been spared in this natural disaster. There has been an estimated 500,000 livestock deaths, and over 30,000 people (4 percent of the population) left vulnerable to the impacts of the drought. “Botswana’s scaled up implementation will require additional resources. As such, there is a need for coordinated effort in innovative domestic resource mobilisation, whilst also strategically tapping into internationally available climate finance,” said Thato Raphaka, the Botswana permanent secretary of environment, natural resources conservation and tourism. And he...

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Africities-Monrovia City Mayor: “I am an inspiration for young people”
Nov22

Africities-Monrovia City Mayor: “I am an inspiration for young people”

Africities-Monrovia City Mayor: “I am an inspiration for young people”     Jefferson Koijee, City Mayor of Monrovia ( Liberia) is in Marrakech for Africities Summit. Mayor of Monrovia since February 2018, he  was selected recently by a program of  the European Union as an ambassador of the fight against climate change. His town was selected as one the 13 towns which will be supported financialy by the European Union for projects related to Energy.  As a former activist and a young political leader, he  is also helping the youth in his town to understand the food security challenges and solutions. Listen to the interview. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache       JeffersonKoijee...

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Villes durables: les villes africaines veulent montrer l’exemple (1)
Nov01

Villes durables: les villes africaines veulent montrer l’exemple (1)

Villes durables: les villes africaines veulent montrer l’exemple (1)  Les villes africaines, soutenues par la Convention des Maires pour l’Afrique, subsaharienne affichent une ferme volonté de mettre en œuvre des stratégies de développement sobres en carbone. Démonstration. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   Le Contexte Depuis la tenue de la Conférence des Nations Unies sur le Climat à Paris en 2015,   les villes africaines   sont aidées par la Convention des Maires pour l’Afrique subsaharienne (CoM SSA) domiciliée au siège de Cités et Gouvernements Locaux Unis d’ Afrique ( CGLU-Afrique) au Ghana. Présentée en  2015 en marge des travaux de  la Conférence des Nations Unies sur le Climat, la Convention des Maires pour l’Afrique subsaharienne  est une initiative financée par l’Union Européenne pour soutenir les villes africaines   dans la lutte contre le changement climatique par l’accès notamment aux énergies propres .La CoMSSA s’est inspirée du succès de la «  Convention des Maires d’Europe », réunissant 6700 municipalités dans la lutte contre le réchauffement climatique. A ce jour, 13 villes francophones, anglophones et lusophone font l’objet d’une attention particulière.  Ce sont des villes pilotes. Les Communes de Zou ( Bénin), de Bouaké ( Côte d’Ivoire), de Nouakchott ( Mauritanie), de Monrovia ( Liberia), Dakar et Pikine ( Sénégal), Tsévié ( Togo), Yaoundé III et Yaoundé IV (Cameroun), Lumbubashi (RDC), Kampala ( Ouganda), Bissau ( Guinée Bissau) sont soutenues financièrement par l’Union Européenne pour des projets liés au renforcement de capacités, et à la réalisation d’action d’accès à l’énergie propre et durable. Dans certaines  villes pilotes telles que, Tsévié  ou Nouakchott ou les communes de ZOU,  il est prévu l’installation de panneaux solaires ou mini-centrales solaires pour l’éclairage public, les ménages et les infrastructures sociales de base. Après plusieurs ateliers à Pikine et à Dakar, les villes sénégalaises  envisagent la mise en œuvre des projets pilotes d’efficacité énergétique. La capitale sénégalaise est sur le point de construire un service hospitalier avec des matériaux locaux pour une meilleure performance énergétique. Autre action à Dakar : une plateforme d’échange et d’apprentissage intitulée « DACKCLIM »  , représentée par différentes classes sociales accompagnent la ville sur les enjeux  de développement durable ( gestion des déchets…). Le PLANERZOU Seule intercommunalité choisie par la Convention des Maires pour l’Afrique Subsaharienne, le département de Zou au Bénin en Afrique l’Ouest  bénéficie d’un projet d’appui à l’élaboration et à la mise en cohérence des outils de planification énergétique durable financé par l’Union Européenne :  le PLANERZOU. Le  département de Zou est composé de 9 communes  situées  au centre du Bénin ( Abomey, Agbangninzoun, Bohicon,   Cové, Djidja, Ouinhi, Zagnanado,  Za-Kpota, et Zogbodomey ). Depuis 2017, le PLANERZOU s’étale sur 30 mois. Son objectif : favoriser l’utilisation des énergies renouvelables par...

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