Botswana responds to improving food insecurity caused by poor rains
Mai30

Botswana responds to improving food insecurity caused by poor rains

Botswana responds to improving food insecurity caused by poor rains Meekaeel Siphambili Gaborone, Botswana- May, 30 2019     The Botswana Ministry of Agricultural Development and Food Security is responding to food insecurity caused by poor rains and the devastating fall armyworm which has attacked some of the country’s regions last april. The government aided by the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation and the Japanese government has launched an emergency response to improving food and nutrition insecurity caused by climate change and promoting sound pest and pesticide management. The Japanese government awarded the Botswana government a grant of 500 thousand US Dollars to strengthen the country’s agricultural sector through awareness, surveillance and early warning, impact assessment and sustainable management and coordination. Helping food security The pest and pesticide management launch follows the recent regional level launching which was on 19 February 2019 in Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe. The launch came after the fall army worm was identified in 2017 in the Kweneng district, 70 to 80 kilometers west of the capital city of Gaborone. According to the country’s agricultural ministry, the fall armyworm has now spread to other districts. Patrick Ralotsia, Minister of Agricultural Development and Food Security says the agricultural sector in Botswana has been hard hit by this pest which is destructive to maize and sorghum. “The fall armyworm has greatly affected the livelihoods of farmers in Botswana resulting in low yield and financial losses. If not urgently controlled, the fall armyworm will detrimentally affect crop production resulting in the country being food insecure. The food insecurity will contribute to the food bill increasing significantly,” says Patrick Ralotsia. He said the outbreaks of pests like the fall armyworm represent a major obstacle to increased cereal production, food and nutrition security in Botswana and it is a challenge that has to be urgently addressed to improve agricultural production. Food security, nutrition security, employment opportunities,   economic development, trade and increased resilience to shocks and challenges are alleged to be what Botswana is increasing facing according to the minister. Understanding the disease in agriculture “The fall armyworm is new in Botswana and one of the key challenges farmers face is the lack of awareness and information. Effective dissemination of information of information on this pest is of paramount importance. Commercial chemical pesticides alone pose health risks to build up of pesticides resistance and higher economic losses,” says Minister of Agricultural Development and Food Security. Patrick Ralotsia says misinformed usage of chemical pesticides could result in the killing of potential indigenous natural enemies of the fall armyworm and other pests. The damages caused by fall armyworm and the use of pesticides...

Read More
Plastic pollution’s many side effects on the ecosystem
Avr10

Plastic pollution’s many side effects on the ecosystem

Plastic pollution’s many side effects on the ecosystem Meekaeel Siphambili Gaborone, Botswana 10, April 2019 Apart from sustaining a rich diversity of natural ecosystems, the country’s water resources are critical for meeting the basic needs related to water supplies for domestic and industrial requirements, with the wildlife included. Fauna and flora in danger Mankind however, has turned out to be his own and the ecosystem’s worst enemy.   Mankind is the destroyer of the much needed water resources and in the process destroying many other animal species living in water and on the wetlands. The fauna and flora, the animal, bird and many other all suffer because of the dumping of construction concrete debris, used tires, and plastic and shop issued plastic carrier bags or any other garbage that is not needed. Plastic Bags are bad for the environment Plastic carrier bags that washed  into dams and lakes normally trap fish, frogs and other water living beings, eventually leading to their prematurely death. Efforts to sensitise the general public on the effects of plastic, debris or garbage falls on deaf ears and always regarded as ‘drivel garbage’. Plastic reduces the aesthetic value of the environment as they hang on trees and generally are widespread in the environment. Some bird species are alleged to die from being attached to plastics. The bird normal flies without stopping for the fear of the plastic attached to it, mostly on the legs. The bird then dies of exhaustion after flying without rest; ‘trying to flee from the plastic’ attached to it, the wind blowing against the plastic forces the bird to fly even harder. Dumping of concrete debris have changed or altered water ways, the plastic, especially the shop issued plastic bags, besides trapping or snaring the fish and birds are alleged to be hazardous to the ecosystem. Plastic is not biodegradable hence once deposited in the soil it persists in the environment for a long period of time. The plastic have adverse impacts on human and animal health due to their impervious characteristic, they serve as a breeding place for mosquitoes and other vermin. Domestic animals like goats and cattle also feed on plastic and they disrupt the digestive process causing bloating and untimely death of animals. Elephant population is suffering The Botswana Ministry of Environment, Natural Resources Conservation and Tourism has made several attempts to manage or control the proliferation of plastic carrier bags in the environment through various strategies such as public education and awareness on proper use of plastic carrier bags, recycling and minimization of its use. Water stress due to changed or altered water courses and with the aid...

Read More
Climate Change: The challenges of Botswana
Fév18

Climate Change: The challenges of Botswana

Climate Change: The challenges of Botswana   By Meekaeel Siphambili Gaborone-Botswana   Ninety percent of the inhabitants of African countries rely on firewood or coal for cooking or domestic use. Most of the countries in Africa rely on coal fired power stations with many of the countries having no laws or regulations on engine emissions as most of the cars used do not meet the standards. The long term goal of the Paris Agreement is to reduce  greenhouse gases emissions. To materialize this, Africa has to make an effort to diversify its energy mix, and to create an enabling environment for the exploitation of renewable energy. The sunny days give room for the countries to tap or use mostly the solar generated power which can be installed anywhere. Several decisions relating to climate change were taken at the 23rd Conference of Parties held in Bonn, Germany; and these motivated countries to negotiate the finer details of how the Paris Agreement will work from 2020 onwards. COP24 also carried the same resolutions on climate change. The year 2020 of the implementation of the Paris Accord  is not far and the effects of climate change continue to show face across the continent. Climate Disasters According to the records, in the last decade, climate change has led to about US$2.5 trillion in disaster losses in developing countries. The number of people affected by natural disasters doubled from 102 million in 2015 to 204 million in 2016. Almost one third of the land is no longer fertile enough to grow food. More than 1.3 billion people live on this deteriorating agricultural land, putting them at risk of climate driven water shortages and depleted harvests. Droughts alone have affected more than 1 billion people in the last decade. Since 2001, droughts have wiped out enough produce to feed 81 million people every day for a year. In the SADC Region alone, the number of food insecure population is at 27 million. Between 2014 and 2016, the Region suffered the worst drought in 35 years, caused by the El Nino phenomenon, which left an estimated 41.4 Million of the population in need of food aid. Botswana has not been spared in this natural disaster. There has been an estimated 500,000 livestock deaths, and over 30,000 people (4 percent of the population) left vulnerable to the impacts of the drought. “Botswana’s scaled up implementation will require additional resources. As such, there is a need for coordinated effort in innovative domestic resource mobilisation, whilst also strategically tapping into internationally available climate finance,” said Thato Raphaka, the Botswana permanent secretary of environment, natural resources conservation and tourism. And he...

Read More
Le Bénin accueillera le  9ème Forum africain du carbone
Juin23

Le Bénin accueillera le 9ème Forum africain du carbone

  Le Bénin accueillera le 9ème Forum africain du carbone Du 28 au 30 juin, les acteurs clés du secteur public, du secteur privé et de la société civile venus d’Afrique et d’ailleurs dans le monde se réuniront à Cotonou au Benin, dans le cadre du 9ème Forum africain du carbone. Leur mission : faire avancer l’action climatique collaborative pour le développement durable dans la région. Présentation. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   Un segment ministériel de Haut niveau   Les acteurs clés du secteur public, du secteur privé et de la société civile venus d’Afrique et d’ailleurs dans le monde se réuniront la semaine prochaine à Cotonou au Benin, dans le cadre du 9ème Forum africain du carbone. Ils  étudieront  notamment le renforcement de  la coopération entre le gouvernement et les autres parties prenantes dans plusieurs secteurs clés pour l’Afrique, notamment l’énergie, l’agriculture et les établissements humains. Le rôle des futurs marchés du carbone fera l’objet d’une attention particulière. Le gouvernement du Bénin organisera  un segment ministériel de haut niveau. Cette réunion permettra  aux ministres de discuter de  la mobilisation de ressources financières pour lutter contre les changements climatiques.  D’après la Convention Cadre des Nations Unies sur les Changements Climatiques, ces ressources  nécessaires,  pour les stratégies que les pays africains peuvent adopter, afin de mettre en œuvre leur plans d’action climatique nationaux (contributions déterminées au niveau national, ou NDC, selon le sigle anglais). Traduire les plans d’action africains « Le moment est venu pour les pays africains de traduire leurs plans d’action climatique nationaux sous l’Accord de Paris sur les changements climatiques en politiques et en programmes applicables au niveau national », a déclaré Patricia Espinosa, Secrétaire exécutive de la Convention-cadre des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques. Et d’ajouter :  « Le Forum africain du carbone permet d’examiner comment les initiatives de réduction des émissions peuvent être renforcées dans des secteurs clés des pays africains. »Ce forum est aussi, selon Mme Espinosa, « une occasion d’étudier le rôle des futurs marchés du carbone pour aider les pays à atteindre les objectifs de l’Accord de Paris » Le ministre Abdoulaye Bio Tchané, ministre d’État chargé du plan et du développement du Gouvernement du Bénin a rappelé dans un communiqué publié récemment que « L’Afrique est le continent le plus affecté par les changements climatiques : deux tiers des Africains gagnent leurs vies grâce aux terres, et il est donc primordial que le continent adopte une voie de développement et une économie résilientes face au climat. » Les discussions du Forum africain du carbone au Bénin porteront notamment sur les  politiques, d’initiatives et d’actions en Afrique, les obstacles et mesures permettant de s’engager dans l’action climatique dans des secteurs clés, les instruments financiers et cadres...

Read More
COP 22 : Préparation de la participation du Bénin
Nov05

COP 22 : Préparation de la participation du Bénin

COP 22 : Préparation de la participation du Bénin  En prélude à la COP 22, le comité national en charge des changements climatiques au Bénin uniformise ses actions. La semaine dernière, scientifiques, négociateurs béninois et acteurs de la société civile se sont réunis à huis clos. Objet principal de leurs discussions : l’unité africaine. Par Hippolyte Agossou En prélude à la COP 22, le comité national en charge des changements climatiques au Bénin uniformise ses actions. La semaine dernière, scientifique, négociateurs béninois et acteurs de la société civile se sont réunis à huis clos. Objet principal de leurs discussions : l’unité africaine. En  2015, 81 milliards de dollars  ont été mobilisés pour des projets financés par les six plus grandes banques multilatérales de développement, selon un rapport présenté par la Banque Mondiale . L’Afrique ne bénéficie  que de 9% de ce  montant, précise le rapport. Les projets africains sont jugés non ” bancables”, soulignent les experts. La COP 22,  toujours selon  les experts, devrait permettre au continent d’obtenir plus de fonds et une autre approche pour lutter contre les changements climatiques. Autres priorités: l’action. ” Nous allons rappeler aux décideurs ces différentes décisions  prises[ lors de la COP 21] pour que l’action accompagne les décisions,” explique, dans le reportage ci-dessous,  Christian Hounkannou, acteur de la société civile du Bénin....

Read More
COP 22- Bénin : Journée Mondiale de lutte contre la pauvreté
Oct25

COP 22- Bénin : Journée Mondiale de lutte contre la pauvreté

  COP 22- Bénin : Journée Mondiale de lutte contre la pauvreté Le 17 octobre dernier, les Nations Unies  ont célébré la journée mondiale de lutte contre la pauvreté. Notre correspond Hippolyte Agossou analyse la situation économique et environnementale du Bénin.   Situation D’après la Banque Mondiale,  le Bénin reste un   pays pauvre  malgré des de taux de croissance annuels modérés, situés entre 4 et 5 % depuis deux décennies.  Le taux de pauvreté de ce pays était de 37,5 % en 2006 ; 35,2 % en 2009 ; 36,2 % en 2011 et de 40,1 % en 2015. Les ménages dirigés par des femmes se portent mieux que ceux dirigés par des hommes, même si elles n’ont pas les mêmes opportunités économiques. . Que représente le plan d’action national du Bénin ( présenté à la COP 21) ? Basée sur  ses programmes nationaux de Réduction de la Pauvreté et de Gestion des Changements climatiques , la contribution nationale du Bénin souhaite promouvoir le développement durable et la résilience au changement climatique.  Objectifs du Bénin: limiter la température en dessous de 2°C ,  mettre en application ses projets d’adaptation et d’atténuation,  obtenir un financement, le renforcement des capacités, le transfert des technologies, et bénéficier de la transparence de l’action. Quels sont les ambitions du Bénin ? Pour élaborer tous les programmes et projets présentés dans sa contribution nationale, le Bénin sollicite 30 milliards de dollars. Mais, il se dit prêt à contribuer à hauteur de 2 milliards de dollars, entre 2016 et 2030. Les émissions du Gaz à effet de Serre du Bénin ne s’élevaient qu’à environ 1 tonne de CO2 par habitant en 2000, relève la contribution. Consciente que ses absorptions de Gaz à effet de Serre sont  supérieures aux émissions, le Bénin s’est tout de même   prononcé pour  réduire ses GES  de 120 mégatonnes de dioxyde de carbone pour les émissions évitées et de 163 mégatonnes de dioxyde de carbone pour les séquestrations ,  dans les secteurs de productions, de  transport,  de la foresterie, de l’ agriculture et de la consommation d’Energie entre 2020 et 2030. Cela tient aussi compte du programme national de reboisement du pays.  Avec une population de plus de 10 millions d’habitants, l’ancienne République de Danhomè, située en Afrique Occidentale dans le Golfe de Guinée, s’est en effet  fixée plusieurs priorités notamment  la lutte contre la pauvreté, le maintien de la croissance économique élevée et l’intégration de la politique d’environnement dans les stratégies de développement, de ce pays faible émetteur de Gaz à effet de Serre.  Le Bénin souhaite orienter sa politique énergétique dans le secteur des énergies renouvelables pour pallier à l’utilisation massive actuelle du bois et du...

Read More