Information for all
Mai08

Information for all

Information for all Human health and biodiversity are in danger in the world right now. Around 1 million animal and plant species are now threatened with extinction, many within decades, more than ever before in human history, finds the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services ( IPBES) in a new report. Recently Comoros , Tanzania, Mozambique and India were devastated by a tropical cyclone . Zimbabwe, Malawi and Mozambique were hit by Cyclone Idai in March. Two unprecedented back-to-back tropical cyclones came in Mozambique in March and April causing the death of more than 1000 people. On April 24, Comoros Islands were hardly affected in coastal, rural and urban areas living 4 people dead and 15 000 people displaced (according to the first report published after the disaster). India was also devastated by a major cyclonic storm. According to the World Meteorology Organization, these cyclones underline the need for coordinated disaster risk reduction strategies, by including strong early warning systems which reach the people who need them most. What one can do with cyclones, climate change, extreme weather, floods, population increase? These issues will be debated during the second international conference on multi hazard early warning to be held in Geneva from 13-17 May. This global platform is a biennial multi-stakeholder forum established by the UN General Assembly to review progress, share knowledge, and discuss the latest developments and and trends in reducing disaster risk. Era Environnement takes this opportunity to publish this week a series of related stories called “Rivoukou-we are safe” about the people who were affected by Cyclone Kenneth in Comoros, one of the world “hospots” of biodiversity. We, as media based in Comoros Islands, in Samba M’bodoni, one of the villages which has seen homes and agricultural areas smashed by the cyclone Kenneth,  would like to put Comoros on the world map. Our aim is to also publish articles on others countries in Africa on disaster risk and solutions. We have already published articles during the cyclone in Comoros, Tanzania and Mozambique. We will also publish a column of an activist in Mozambique, and you will have the possibility to send your comment to her. Our facebook page Eraenvironnement, @sustainableDG, is also open for comments in French, Spanish, Portugese, English, Swahili and Comorian. Thank you Editorial by Houmi...

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Séréhini: Après le Cyclone Kenneth
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Séréhini: Après le Cyclone Kenneth

Séréhini:  Après le Cyclone Kenneth Deux jours après le passage du cyclone Kenneth, les Comores se réveillent difficilement. Plusieurs habitations et récoltes sont détruites. Plus d’une dizaine de milliers de personnes sont touchées par le cyclone et 4 personnes sont décédées, selon les chiffres officiels.  A Séréhini,  à environ 6 kilomètres de la ville de Moroni, capitale des Comores,  un jeune homme est debout sur la route. Il fait très chaud. Le soleil brille à son Zénith.  Un autre jeune homme ,  casquette sur la tête,  est assis sur un banc en briques situé en face de la Présidence, la résidence secondaire du président des Comores construite dans les  années 80. Le taxi s’arrête et dépose des personnes. Il est 11h17.   Le jeune homme se lève.  Il  est accompagné par plusieurs jeunes hommes, les hommes se  dirigent vers des champs d’exploitation agricole. Il gère 10 champs loués  à des propriétaires vivant à Séréhini et dans la région pour un prix de 300 euros par champs et par an.  Il est le président de l’association d’agriculteurs Ujamaa. C’est la première fois qu’il subit une catastrophe naturelle.  A ce jour, il n’a reçu aucun soutien financier.  Une partie de ses récoltes est dévastée par le cyclone, notamment les bananeraies, cultures très appréciées par les comoriens,et très rentables. La destruction des bananeraies  est une perte énorme pour ce jeune homme de 32 ans, originaire d’Anjouan, l’île voisine située dans l’archipel des Comores. Monsieur Saifi, c’est son nom, travaille comme agriculteur à la Grande Comore depuis 13 ans. Il  a planté de nombreuses bananeraies dans les champs qu’il cultive.  Aux Comores, la population vit majoritairement de l’agriculture.  Les cultures vivrières et de rente sont abondantes, mais manquent d’usine de transformation et d’encadrement. Les Comores font partie des Pays les Moins Avancés au Monde.  L’installation de la bananeraie, de la cocoteraie,  mais aussi de taros  sous forêt naturelle est héritée de la colonisation. Il existe plusieurs espèces endémiques autour des bananeraies, plus particulièrement dans les forêts comoriennes.  Les Comores disposent d’un patrimoine faunistique méconnu au niveau international et son menacées depuis de nombreuses années par des problèmes environnementaux liés entre autres aux changements climatiques. Reportage. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache         Serehini1 (1)         Serehini2         lad_couvertedelaciterne   Monsieur Saifi vit à Vouvouni, une ville située au centre sud de Moroni, la capitale de l’Union des Comores. Chaque champs dispose d’une citerne qui permet d’arroser les cultures. Les perspectives Monsieur Saifi a été formé par un congolais de la République Démocratique du Congo qui travaillait au ministère de la production dans les années 80. Aujourd’hui cette personne est décédée, mais lui a permis d’apprendre à cultiver des cultures...

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Mtwara residents allowed to go back home but threat from storm still looms large
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Mtwara residents allowed to go back home but threat from storm still looms large

  Mtwara residents allowed to go back home but threat from storm still looms large     By Deodatus Mfugale Dar es Salaam Tanzania April 25, 2019   MORE than 5,000 Mtwara town residents who had left their homes early today to avoid the forecasted catastrophic impacts of Tropical Storm Kenneth have been allowed to go back to their homes but stay alert for any signs of the storm gaining momentum. Mtwara regional  authorities had sheltered the residents in six centres as a safety measure against the tropical storm after the Tanzanania Meterological authorities had forecast the storm would make a landfall in Mtwara by noon on Thursday. The weather authority had warned that the storm would lead to heavy floods and destroy various infrastructures, thereby threatening human life. However by 16hrs, about four hours after the   forecast landfall, neither strong winds nor heavy rains were experienced. The Regional Defense and Security Committee thus allowed the residents to go home but warned that they should be alert as the situation could change. The government leaders would keep the public informed of in case of any developments. “The weather has been generally calm contrary to the forecast. By 15hrs the wind speed was 50 kph as opposed to 140kph which the weather authority had forecast. We believe it is safe enough for you to go back home and engage in your daily businesses,” said Mtwara Regional Commissioner Gelacius Byakanwa but was quick to warn the residents to be alert for any changes in the weather. “But it is not yet over! The storm is still there and things might change. So be on the lookout and tune to the news media for any development. We have also arranged for a public address system that will be employed to inform you immediately should any changes happen,” explained the Regional Commissioner. However according to the Director of TMA, Dr Agnes Kijazi, Tropical Storm Kenneth was still active 177 kilometres away from Mtwara, gaining speed from 130kph to 140 kph and heading towards Mozambique. “So things are far from over. The storm is drawing heavy clouds over many areas in the southern part of the country and these areas are likely to get very heavy rain. The public should take precautions as the dangers posed by Tropical Storm Kenneth are still valid,” she said. According t the Director, the storm will make a landfall in Mozambique early Friday morning, about 230 kilometres away from Mtwara with winds blowing at 100kph. “The fact that it is heading to Mozambique does not mean that we are out of danger; the landfall will affect areas about...

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Residents vacate homes as Kenneth slowly lands in Mtwara
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Residents vacate homes as Kenneth slowly lands in Mtwara

Residents vacate homes as Kenneth slowly lands in Mtwara By Deodatus Mfugale Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Hundreds of Mtwara town residents and its environs have  vacated their homes to relocate to safer places before Tropical Storm Kenneth makes a landfall in Mtwara town in the afternoon today. By 6.00am today, light showers had started falling in the town and its outskirts as the wind also became stronger by the hour. Most of those who moved to safer places have their homes located close to shore, thus most vulnerable to the negative impacts of the tropical storm. The Mtwara Municipal Director Col. Emmanuel Mwaigobeko identified safe areas that people should move to as Mtwara airport,Majengo, and Tandika Primary schools, Naliendele army camp and Mitego and Sabodo secondary schools. “ All schools should remain closed. Employees should not go to work today and all should move to safe areas as directed. Do not take anything with you,” he stressed. Earlier the Tanzanania Meteorological Authority Manager for the Southern Zone Daudi Amasi had identified vulnerable areas from which people should vacate as including, Mikindani, Mtepwezi, Kiyanga, Kiyangu, Chuno, Miseti, Skoya and Rreli all of which are close to the shore. ”These are the areas that will probably be most hit by the storm. People must vacate their homes very early in the morning,” he warned, adding that people in other areas must also move to safe places. The Mtwara regional Commissioner Gelacius Byakanwa also warned  Mtwara residents, particularly fishermen to stay away from the ocean the whole day today until the situation normalized.”This warning also applies to all those who use vessels for purposes other than fishing. Please stay away from the ocean,” the RC warned. A resident of Mtwara town Abdallah Mbangile said in an interview that by 8.00 this morning the wind had started to gain strength and there were light showers.” We are leaving our homes and I am relocating to the airport for safety,” he said. However, not everyone heeded to the warning given by the leaders. “Some people are reluctant to leave their places; maybe they don’t realize the danger that goes with storms,” explained Mbangile. A journalist working for Safari Radio in Mtwara town, Baraka Jamal  said that there were light showers early in the morning and a weak wind. “There was a bit of wind at night but then it died off. Right now (8.15 am) there is a bit of wind, a weak one. Maybe it will pick up soon,” he said. According to the journalist all offices have been closed for today and residents have been seen relocating to places identified by the...

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Why man should care about the environment
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Why man should care about the environment

Why man should care about the environment By Olumide Idowu* A clean environment is essential for healthy living The more you don’t care about the environment, the more it will become polluted with contaminants and toxins that have a harmful impact on our health. Air pollution can cause respiratory diseases and cancer, among other problems. Water pollution can lead to typhoid, diarrheal diseases, and other ailments. The local authorities have to promote caring for the environment. Earth is warming For the sake of our children and our future, we must do more to combat climate change, adapt to its impact and mitigate its effects. Children yet unborn will appreciate it There is the need to look ahead into the future, there must be a realisation of the fact that there are attendant consequences if we waste and destroy natural resources, and unsustainably exhaust the land – instead of using it in a way that will increase its usefulness. So it is our duty to leave the Earth in a better state that we met for the unborn generation. Biodiversity is key Biological diversity or biodiversity refers to the variety of plants, animals, and other living things in our world. It can be negatively influenced by habitat loss and degradation due to human activity, climate change, and pollution, among other things. Planet earth is our home Until when technology makes it possible for human being to permanently reside in space or any other planet, the Earth for now is our home – it is where we live, so we had better take good care of it. For sure, we would be doing our world and ourselves a lot of good if we do the simplest things in our home or wherever we find ourselves to make this a reality. What can we do? The problems we are facing now are tough. However, the good news is that, you don’t have to be an expert or a millionaire to save the Planet – everyone can help to do their bit for the environment. In other words, if each of us can be more conscious of environmental issues and willing to take some simple steps to save the Planet, we can make a huge difference. Nowadays, with increasing environmental awareness among the public, people around the world are coming together to fight for a greener future, and the effort has been yielding great results. As a pioneering member of environmental advocacy community, Better World International, is always committed to improve and take care of our immediate environment, by providing practical tips to its members on the things they can do to live...

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Election présidentielle aux Comores: la population en attente de solutions
Mar25

Election présidentielle aux Comores: la population en attente de solutions

  Dimanche 24 Mars, plus de 300 000 comoriens ont été appelés aux urnes dans le cadre de l’élection présidentielle en Union de Comores. Au lendemain de ces élections très difficiles , ERA ENVIRONNEMENT revient sur les attentes de la population dans certaines localités. Rencontres.   Ecoutez Ilias Ibrahim Mzahahé , Agriculteur, de Nioumadzaha Bambao, une localité du sud de la Grande Comore (Union des Comores).                   STE-019 Amina Djoumoi, Nioumadzaha Bambao Pour cette mère de sept enfants, la ville de Nioumadzaha Bambao ne souffre de pas de la faim.Mais la seule difficulté est le manque d’intérêt des jeunes pour l’agriculture. Era Environnement:  Aujourd’hui vous  votez, que pensez-vous du rôle de la jeunesse dans les activités liées à  l’agriculture  à Nioumdzaha Bambao? Amina Djoumoi: Un de mes enfants cultive de temps en temps et depuis quatre nous ne manquons de rien. Nous vivons du manioc et des bananes qu’il cultive. Mais aucun de mes enfants travaillent. Moi, je vend du bois et je vend ce que mon fils cultive. Grâce à Dieu,  je n’ai jamais mendié pour manger. A Nioumadzaha Bambao, vous avez de l’Ylang Ylang, de la Vanille et du Girofle, n’est-ce pas ? Oui, on a beaucoup de vanille et aussi du manioc, des bananes. On ne souffre pas. Mais ce qui nous gêne c’est de voir nos enfants sans activités, ne désirant pas cultiver. Parce qu’ils se sentent “patrons”. Ils pensent que cultiver n’est pas propre. Seul 1 jeune sur 10 est intéressé par l’agriculture ici. J’ai sept garçons. Regardez ce jeune, c’est mon fils. Depuis le début de la campagne, je ne l’ai pas vu. Je ne sais pas quel est le       AminaDjoumoi (1) candidat favori, mais…j’espère qu’il se portera bien si Dieu le veut.   Elamine Mohamed Ahmed- Dembeni, Etudiant. Que représente Dembeni en termes de ressources naturelles? Dembeni regroupe plusieurs communes. Dembeni est une zone d’agriculteurs et d’intellectuels. Notre agriculture est basée, entre autres,  sur la culture de la tomate, du manioc. Les Comores, Petit Etat Insulaire en Développement, sont victimes de changement climatique. Concrètement, comment le vivez-vous à Dembeni? Le changement climatique est visible. Les saisons ne sont plus respectées. La saison du fruits à pain et des jacquiers est décalée. On les retrouve aussi  pendant le mois du ramadan. La période des tomates est aussi inversée. On se retrouve avec des décalages importants. Et c’est lié au dérèglement climatique. Nous sommes aujourd’hui au premier tour de l’élection présidentielle quelles sont vos attentes par rapport aux difficultés que vous vivez ici avec le changement climatique ? Dans le bavou de Gongwe, où nous nous trouvons, nous n’avons jamais vu de...

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