Botswana responds to improving food insecurity caused by poor rains
Mai30

Botswana responds to improving food insecurity caused by poor rains

Botswana responds to improving food insecurity caused by poor rains Meekaeel Siphambili Gaborone, Botswana- May, 30 2019     The Botswana Ministry of Agricultural Development and Food Security is responding to food insecurity caused by poor rains and the devastating fall armyworm which has attacked some of the country’s regions last april. The government aided by the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation and the Japanese government has launched an emergency response to improving food and nutrition insecurity caused by climate change and promoting sound pest and pesticide management. The Japanese government awarded the Botswana government a grant of 500 thousand US Dollars to strengthen the country’s agricultural sector through awareness, surveillance and early warning, impact assessment and sustainable management and coordination. Helping food security The pest and pesticide management launch follows the recent regional level launching which was on 19 February 2019 in Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe. The launch came after the fall army worm was identified in 2017 in the Kweneng district, 70 to 80 kilometers west of the capital city of Gaborone. According to the country’s agricultural ministry, the fall armyworm has now spread to other districts. Patrick Ralotsia, Minister of Agricultural Development and Food Security says the agricultural sector in Botswana has been hard hit by this pest which is destructive to maize and sorghum. “The fall armyworm has greatly affected the livelihoods of farmers in Botswana resulting in low yield and financial losses. If not urgently controlled, the fall armyworm will detrimentally affect crop production resulting in the country being food insecure. The food insecurity will contribute to the food bill increasing significantly,” says Patrick Ralotsia. He said the outbreaks of pests like the fall armyworm represent a major obstacle to increased cereal production, food and nutrition security in Botswana and it is a challenge that has to be urgently addressed to improve agricultural production. Food security, nutrition security, employment opportunities,   economic development, trade and increased resilience to shocks and challenges are alleged to be what Botswana is increasing facing according to the minister. Understanding the disease in agriculture “The fall armyworm is new in Botswana and one of the key challenges farmers face is the lack of awareness and information. Effective dissemination of information of information on this pest is of paramount importance. Commercial chemical pesticides alone pose health risks to build up of pesticides resistance and higher economic losses,” says Minister of Agricultural Development and Food Security. Patrick Ralotsia says misinformed usage of chemical pesticides could result in the killing of potential indigenous natural enemies of the fall armyworm and other pests. The damages caused by fall armyworm and the use of pesticides...

Read More
Audrey de Souza- Blue Economy : “It’s all about the people for the people”
Mai14

Audrey de Souza- Blue Economy : “It’s all about the people for the people”

The Second Ocean UN Conference will be held in Lisbon on June 2-6 2020  focusing on solutions to save the Ocean. It will be co-hosted by Kenya and Portugal.  Era Environnement  introduces you to a young woman from Mombasa, who was part  of the international blue conference held in Nairobi ( Kenya) on November 27th 2018.Her name is Audrey de Souza.   Era Environnement  took her point of view during the conference in Nairobi. Miss de Souza,  is an experienced entrepreneur  and a consultant in Mombasa. She  works for a company name as  Intoku Africa.  Audrey de  Souza might attend the conference in Portugal next year, as she works on solutions to protect her country in the coastline of  Kenya, in Mombasa. Listen to the interview in three parts on water sanitation, finance and woman participation .       Watersanitation (1)       Womenparticipation       Empoweringwomen Interview by Houmi...

Read More
Comment reconstruire Maweni ya Mbude
Mai10

Comment reconstruire Maweni ya Mbude

Comment reconstruire Maweni ya Mbude   Deux jours après le passage du  cyclone Kenneth, ERA ENVIRONNEMENT s’est rendue à Maweni ya Mbudé ou Maoueni Mboudé, une localité située au nord de la Grande Comore, près d’un autre village agricole Ivembéni. Reconstruire ce village   est la priorité des agronomes. Comment ? Que représente Maweni ya Mbudé à la Grande Comore? Cette localité est l’une des  six localités exploitant la forêt de la Grille, une forêt claire et humide de moyenne altitude où est pratiquée l’agroforesterie. Les agriculteurs y cultivent le taro, le manioc, la patate douce et la banane. A noter que 80% des cultures vivrières des Comores sont destinés à l’autoconsommation. La banane est le produit de l’agriculture locale le plus consommé aux Comores. Les bananes sont le quatrième aliment de base mondial derrière le riz, le blé et le maïs, selon l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’Alimentation et l’Agriculture (FAO). D’après la FAO, la production annuelle en 2013 était  estimée à quelque 107 millions de tonnes, avec seulement 16 millions de tonnes destinées au marché international, pour une valeur de près de 9 milliards de dollars.  A Maweni Ya Mbudé, le cyclone Kenneth a détruit toutes les bananeraies. Or, les Comores sont connues pour leur diversité de  bananes. Problème:  la destruction des bananeraies  par le cyclone remet en question la durabilité de cette ressource agricole. L’agriculture aux Comores est victime des très fortes chaleurs, d’une pluviométrie intense et variable, d’espèces envahissantes, d’une baisse de la biodiversité en lien avec l’évolution du climat. Selon la seconde communication nationale sur les changements climatiques éditée en 2012, les cyclones et leur violence aggravée entraîneraient une diminution du rendement et pénaliseraient les familles des producteurs. Atoumani Moilim, Ingénieur Agronome, ancien étudiant à Dakar au Sénégal, diplômé d’un master en gestion de la fertilité du sol donne son avis sur la question et apporte ses solutions. Ecoutez       AtoumaniMoilim Propos recueillis par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Maweni Ya Mboudé Crédit photo: Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache...

Read More
Comorians Coastal areas, after Cyclone Kenneth
Mai10

Comorians Coastal areas, after Cyclone Kenneth

Comorian Coastal areas, after Cyclone Kenneth   In Comoros, 7 people died  and  19,300 people were displaced because of   the tropical Cyclone Kenneth happened  from Wednesday  24th to Thusday 25 th of April. Most of the agriculture and coastal areas  were affected by the strongest tropical cyclone of the archipelago’s history.  The risk of water-borne diseases has increased in Comoros countries due to damage to water and sanitation infrastructure, acccording to United Nations Office for the Coordination for Human Affairs (OCHA). Six health facilities were reportedly impacted, including the El-Maarouf National Hospital Centre, two regional hospitals in Foumbouni and Mitsamiouli ( Grande Comore, ), two health posts in Mkazi and Tsinimoichongo ( Grande Comore)as well as a health centre in Nioumachoua  ( Moheli) , according to a rapid assessment conducted on 26 April and confirmed by World Health Organization. Known as one of the best  places to visit in Comoros, Mitsamiouli has seen  part of its infrastructures, trees, and homes destroyed  by the cyclone. Report by Houmi Ahamed -Mikidache     Mitsmiamiouli, northern Comoros Saturday April 27, Roukia, 28 years old, is sitting in the public bus,  the “taxi brousse”  in Gare du Nord in Moroni ( the capital of Comoros). Gare du Nord is the place where she used to take the bus after working many hours as a laboratory technician in hospital El Maarouf, the national hospital of Comoros. For the first time since the Cyclone came to Comoros, she can go to her mom’s place in Mitsamiouli. ” Everyone is safe, except the house, the roof disappeared,” she said.  The bus leaves Moroni. Roukia is looking around. It’s been three days since the Cyclone came to Comoros.  She could not come to her mom’s place before. “The roads were blocked by fallen trees, “she explained. She looks to the windows of the bus. ” This is first time I saw all these trees fallen in the street on my way to my mom’s place, ” she added. The bus passed through many localities which have been damaged by the storm. Finally, one hour later,  Roukia arrived in Mitsamiouli. Fishermen are sitting behind the sea. Mitsamiouli is one the towns in the north of Grande Comore which has been hardly demolished by the cyclone.    Listen to the interview of Shabaan Mohamed Mfwaraya in Comorian and French.       Comores The Fishermen in Mitsamiouli Fisherman Shabaane Mohamed Mfwaraya is  standing behind the sea with others fishermen, in the center of Mitsamiouli, in the north of  Grande Comore.   This  experienced fisherman said people in his town did not believe the cyclone will come. ” We were informed earlier by the Civil Security...

Read More
Call for action for Post Idai-Kenneth
Mai09

Call for action for Post Idai-Kenneth

Call for action for Post Idai-Kenneth *By Thelma Munhequete  Demand to access to technical know-how The gap between humanitarian management policy and actual SOS management practices is widening, due to ongoing capacity constraints or non-existence SOS management facilities for  the different climate disasters. Resolving this capacity gap will require major investments and access to technical know-how. A group of friends and colleagues and private stakeholders from all over the world are willing to help the people in Beira, in Mozambique; based on the set of guiding ideas and principals on this humanitarian action. It involves ethics and value to standardize the conduct and behaviour to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, reputation, integrity and credibility of Post IDAI Action Plan.   The Sustainable Development Goals to take into account The newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals that have replaced the Millennium Development Goals provide a generational opportunity to address the lingering problems the world still and will still face following the MDGs. Achieving  the management of climate disaster  by prevention and explaining the  significant adverse effects  of climate disaster in human health and the environment, is  essential and it is part of the three sustainable development goals below: 1. Goal 4 Target 4,1 “by 2030 ,ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant effective learning outcomes” 2. Goal 11 “Make cities and human settlements inclusive ,safe resilient and sustainable” Target 11.6 “by 2020,the world should reduce the adverse per capital environmental impacts of cities ,including by paying special attention to air quality ,municipal, 3. Goal 12 “Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns “Target 12.5 “by 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse Engaging all  stakeholders The 3rd AFRICA CLIMATE SMART AGRICULTURE ALLIANCE FORUM held in Dakar 27th and 28th March 2019, highlighted the latest thinking on Stakeholder engagements, particularly the need to stem the flow of mass production and consumption inherent in a take-make-waste, linear economy by reducing demand and shifting to reusable Climate Smart Agriculture in African context as well as the Gender inclusion. Engaging the general public, the private sector, organizations, policy makers, and local governments in Africa in sustainable strategy is urgent in Africa. The experiences of school project implemented  in Mozambique in 2013 showed the importance of  the Gender Climate Change (CCGAP) issue. The currently Integrated Management Chemical Pollutants and Solid Waste as well as Child Protection and ongoing Climate smart Agriculture project (focus on Cassava roots) made great strides to develop a communities disaster risks management strategies. Financing opportunities Financing opportunities for Climate Smart Agriculture can be the key, through  investments for smallholders systems.  Finding Climate Smart Agriculture strategies   by deploying Information and...

Read More
News in brief
Mai09

News in brief

News in brief By Era Environnement A workshop on Fall Armyworm to be held in Zimbabwe The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture and the Department of Research and Specialist Services, Ministry of Lands, Agriculture, Water, Climate and Rural Resettlement, are jointly organising a fall armyworm (FAW )Compact Country Inception Workshop on 20-22 May 2019 in Harare, Zimbabwe. Key participants to the workshop will include national partners involved in agricultural research and extension, the academia, agro-input suppliers (agrochemical and seed industry), CGIAR centers, FAO, CABI, development partners, NGOs, and farmer associations.  According to the organizers, the overall objective of this workshop will be to formulate a comprehensive and sustainable country FAW response strategy taking into account experiences from end of 2016 to date as well as parallel initiatives by FAO, CABI, CIMMYT, USAID and other partners. The fall armyworm (FAW) Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) is unarguably one of the most damaging insect pests to be introduced to Africa in the 21st century. Its spread throughout sub-Saharan Africa has been very rapid owing to the ideal climate, lack of a resting stage, wide host range and varying host plant phenologies. IEAA to brief on Sterile Insect Technique in Senegal On May 9th, the International Atomic Energy Agency ( IAEA) will be briefing  on the success of the Sterile Insect Technique in increasing agricultural productivity and boosting income in Senegal. The United States is the exclusive funder of a nearly $5 million IAEA Peaceful Uses Initiative (PUI) project, “Contributing to Agricultural Development in West Africa through the Control of Tsetse Flies and Trypanosomosis,” having contributed $4,993,367 to this project since its inception in 2010. The project aims to eradicate the tsetse population (Glossina palpalis gambiensis) from the Niayes region, northeast of Dakar using the IAEA’s Sterile Insect Technique (SIT).  The tsetse fly population is now approaching confirmed eradication and the project has had significant positive socioeconomic benefits on farmers in the region. High Level Workshop: 16-18 May 2019-Pretoria, South Africa A High Level workshop organized by the International Seabed Authority ( ISA) and the Government of the Republic of South will be held on 16-May 2019  . Held over three days, this workshop aims to foster international and regional cooperation to promote the sustainable development of Africa’s deep seabed resources in support of Africa’s Blue Economy. The workshop will bring together key stakeholders including official representatives of Angola, Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, South Africa and Zambia; as well as African experts on the law of the sea and mining...

Read More