« Nous sommes   la première agence d’intérim des Comores »- Kamal Abdallah (HAZI COMORES)
Juil10

« Nous sommes   la première agence d’intérim des Comores »- Kamal Abdallah (HAZI COMORES)

« Nous sommes   la première agence d’intérim des Comores »- Kamal Abdallah (HAZI COMORES) Kamal Abdallah, Directeur Général de la première agence d’Intérim aux Comores, est le pionnier en matière de recrutement dans ce pays situé dans l’Océan Indien, dans le canal de Mozambique. Son leitmotiv : l’accompagnement à tous les niveaux. Era Environnement  l’a rencontré récemment. ERA ENVIRONNEMENT : Kamal Abdallah, Directeur Général de Hazi Comores. Comment êtes-vous devenu chef d’Entreprise aux Comores ? KAMAL ABDALLAH : Je suis à la base  un financier formé à la comptabilité et à la finance à Fès ( Maroc) et à Marseille ( France). Après trois années d’études, je suis rentré aux Comores et j’ai  travaillé pendant sept ans à la Banque Pour l’Industrie et le Commerce ( BIC COMORES). J’ai par la suite  effectué une formation de troisième cycle  en Conseil et Gestion PMI-PME à l’île de la Réunion. A mon retour à Moroni, j’ai crée le premier  cabinet d’expertise comptable et d’audit aux Comores,  en association avec un cabinet de l’île de la Réunion qui a des filiales dans l’Océan Indien à Maurice, à Madagascar et à Mayotte. Depuis 2001, j’ai  crée plusieurs entreprises avec des amis. Parmi ces sociétés, nous avons crée en 2004 une société de recrutement, une agence d’intérim : HAZI COMORES.SARL qui répondait au besoin d’une plateforme. En 2004, il n’y avait, en effet  pas de structure aux Comores qui pouvait accueillir les demandeurs d’emploi et les entreprises qui offraient des emplois.   ERA ENVIRONNEMENT : Il y a un taux de chômage très important aux Comores. Comment les jeunes sont informés de l’existence de votre agence et comment les accompagnés vous ?   KAMAL ABDALLAH : Ils sont informés par les panneaux se trouvant dans les trois agences. Nous avons  trois agences: deux dans la capitale à  Moroni,  Hambramba ( vers la route qui mène à l’hôtel RETAJ)et à la Gare du Nord ( à la coulée), ainsi qu’une nouvelle agence   dans le nord de la Grande Comore à Mitsamiouli.  On a aussi un site internet (Hazicomores.com), une page facebook et instagram que nous alimentons régulièrement.   ERA ENVIRONNEMENT : Que pensez-vous de la récente signature de convention de financement de 4 millions d’Euros   entre l’Agence Française de Développement ( AFD) et le Ministère Comorien des Finances pour la création d’emploi dans les milieux ruraux ?   KAMAL ABDALLAH : C’est une bonne chose qu’il y ait une signature de convention pour le financement de  la création d’emploi. Seulement, nous,  en tant qu’acteur du secteur privé et agence de recrutement et  d’intérim, nous n’avons  été ni informés ni sollicités dans la mise en place de ce financement. Nous sommes pourtant  la première agence d’intérim des Comores.  On...

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New toolkit launched to guide governments to drive economies through tourism
Juin24

New toolkit launched to guide governments to drive economies through tourism

New toolkit launched to guide governments to drive economies through tourism By Duncan Mboyah A new tool kit has been launched to guide African governments to drive their economies through tourism. The tool kit will guide protected area authorities to attract new international investment to fund national parks while also conserving environments and providing socio-economic benefits. “The kit provide models on protected areas in Africa and gives predicted revenue increases of between four and eleven times within a decade,” Dr. Lauren Evans, Director of Conservation Science at Space for Giants notes during the launched in the sidelines of the summit on wildlife conservation in Zimbabwe.Dr. Evans observes that Africa’s unique diversity of wildlife and habitat has the potential to radically transform the continent’s economy. She says that it is encouraging that a few state protected areas are meeting their potential as engines for growth and presents a major opportunity for governments. “Cared for and sustainably developed, these are national assets that can provide significant financial and social returns now and long into the future,” she adds. Bringing new private sector investment Presenting a paper, Building a Wildlife Economy: Developing Nature-Based Tourism in African State Protected Areas, Dr. Evans notes that national parks and other state-owned conservation areas could significantly multiply the revenue they pump into African economies. The paper says that bringing new private-sector investment to underfunded protected areas to capitalize on surging interest in nature-based tourism would help fund conservation without draining state finances, while driving sustainable local and national development. Oliver Poole, executive director of the Giants Club, says that the paper details not only the boost to an African country’s economy that comes from developing tourism to its national parks in a sustainable way, but also the steps that governments can best take to secure that share of the tourism market. “If governments implement the toolkit laid out in this report they will not only help secure the long-term future of their wildlife and the landscapes they rely on but also will draw on foreign investment, create jobs and raise the GDP of their nation,” he adds. The authors notes that four of every five tourists to sub-Saharan Africa visits to view wildlife while the number of tourists is set to double to 134m by 2030. Sustainable Tourism creates jobs Tourism already drives 8.5 percent of Africa’s GDP and provides 24 million jobs while spending on tourism, hospitality and recreation could double to more than $260 billion by 2030. They however called for urgent improvement of the economy and ecological value to save wildlife and landscapes that are under a cute threat. The paper states found out that some...

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Wildlife experts meeting to enforce new rules in wildlife management
Juin24

Wildlife experts meeting to enforce new rules in wildlife management

Wildlife experts meeting to enforce new rules in wildlife management By Duncan Mboyah Wildlife experts in Zimbabwe’s Victoria Falls this week to enforce new rules in wildlife management. The summit that is being held from June 23 – 25, 2019 has been convened by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the African Union (AU) to radically change the way the continent’s nature-based economy is managed. “To save wildlife and preserve livelihoods, we must ensure that wild spaces remain a legitimate and competitive land-use option,” Joyce Msuya, Deputy Executive Director of UNEP said. Msuya noted that the there is urgent need to create a new and effective wildlife economy so as to ensure that they are used responsibly. A New led Africa-led vision The summit is a new, Africa-led vision of conservation that links the private sector with national authorities and local communities to design and finance conservation-compatible investments that deliver sustainable economic and ecological benefits to countries, people and the environment.   In Africa, businesses such as tourism, the harvesting of plants and natural products for food, cosmetics or medicines, wildlife credit schemes for direct payments for conservation, or fees, taxes and levies tied to the use of nature, employ millions of people and earn governments billions of dollars in revenue. “Africa has made significant headway in protecting natural spaces and conserving wildlife and ecosystems,” Josefa Correia Sacko, AU Commissioner for Rural Economy and Agriculture.   Sacko noted that it is time to boost economies through Africa-led public-private partnerships that place communities at the heart of investment, while taking into account the need to continue the conservation pathway.” Alongside commercial rewards, conserved habitats drive local, regional and global environmental benefits. According to UNEP and the World Conservation Monitoring Center the consumer spending on tourism, hospitality and recreation in Africa, estimated at $124 billion in 2015, is expected to reach $262 billion by 2030. They said that even as economies built on wildlife continue to grow, they must take into account economic, social and ecological sustainability. The African Wildlife Economy Initiative to be launched The summit is set to develop a road map to social sustainability that mainstreams local communities as co-investors in the nature-based economy. This will ensure that people living with nature must be at the center of transactions, and communities must be treated as equal partners, with their own conservation and development aspirations similarly valued alongside important interventions to conserve species. Emmerson Mnangagwa, President of Zimbabwe, will launch the African Wildlife Economy Initiative.   12 Ministerial delegations from Angola, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Gambia, Zambia, Chad and South Sudan are due to attend, as well as private sector...

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“Young African Scientists are engaging to make Africa Disaster Resilient Ready!” MARYANNE MURIUKI
Juin03

“Young African Scientists are engaging to make Africa Disaster Resilient Ready!” MARYANNE MURIUKI

“Young African Scientists are engaging to make Africa Disaster Resilient Ready! “ MARYANNE MURIUKI   Last may,  15 young scientists from Tunisia, Morocco, South Africa, Central African Republic, Madagascar, Kenya, Tanzania, Cameroun, Congo, Uganda, Burundi, Ghana, Nigeria, Ivory Coast,   and South Sudan have been selected by the African Union to be part of the African Youth Advisory board in Nairobi with the aim to  facilitate the implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 which is  a 15-year, voluntary, non-binding agreement which recognizes that the State has the primary role to reduce disaster risk. Maryanne  Muriuki, a 28 years old young woman from Nyandarua County in the Central Province in  Kenya was among these 15 young scientists. She was recently interviewed by Era Environnement.   ERA ENVIRONNEMENT:  How were these 15 young scientists of the African Youth Advisory board selected? MARYANNE MURIUKI:  The board comprises of 15 young people between 18 and 35 years. We all come from various disciplines, but all our efforts are towards Disaster Risk Reduction. We also represent various disciplines, including academia, the private sector, civil society, and government. We also represent all the regions of Africa, East, West, Southern, Northern and Central. We are a total of 7 women on the Board! All of us are passionate and are involved in the implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR 2015-2030), and closer home, are in alignment with the AU Programme of Action (PoA). ERA ENVIRONNEMENT: How this board will enhance the capacity building of African youth on their activities related to the prevention of natural disasters? MARYANNE MURIUKI: This is a good question. African Youth Advisory Board-Disaster Risk Reduction will organise capacity building workshops in collaboration with the African Union Commission (AUC), Regional Economic Communities (RECs) and other relevant institutions centred on the four  priorities of action Sendai Framework for African Union Youth and Young Politicians. We will also leverage on electronic and non-electronic platforms to share capacity building information on Disaster Risk Reduction. Already, we have engaged quite a number of African youth in Disaster Risk Reduction through our social media platforms. African Youth Advisory Board-Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) will also facilitate intergenerational capacity building in Disaster Risk Reduction between youth practitioners and experienced Disaster Risk Reduction practitioners at different levels of engagement. Finally, the Board will create avenues for the interaction of youth and youth organisations in DRR with related disciplines such as Climate Change, Urbanisation and Sustainable Development for cross discipline building of capacities. ERA ENVIRONNEMENT:  What was the outcome of the meeting in Nairobi ? MARYANNE MURIUKI:  We have set targets for the coming six months, basing on the four priorities for Action: Understanding disaster risk, Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk,...

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Botswana responds to improving food insecurity caused by poor rains
Mai30

Botswana responds to improving food insecurity caused by poor rains

Botswana responds to improving food insecurity caused by poor rains Meekaeel Siphambili Gaborone, Botswana- May, 30 2019     The Botswana Ministry of Agricultural Development and Food Security is responding to food insecurity caused by poor rains and the devastating fall armyworm which has attacked some of the country’s regions last april. The government aided by the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation and the Japanese government has launched an emergency response to improving food and nutrition insecurity caused by climate change and promoting sound pest and pesticide management. The Japanese government awarded the Botswana government a grant of 500 thousand US Dollars to strengthen the country’s agricultural sector through awareness, surveillance and early warning, impact assessment and sustainable management and coordination. Helping food security The pest and pesticide management launch follows the recent regional level launching which was on 19 February 2019 in Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe. The launch came after the fall army worm was identified in 2017 in the Kweneng district, 70 to 80 kilometers west of the capital city of Gaborone. According to the country’s agricultural ministry, the fall armyworm has now spread to other districts. Patrick Ralotsia, Minister of Agricultural Development and Food Security says the agricultural sector in Botswana has been hard hit by this pest which is destructive to maize and sorghum. “The fall armyworm has greatly affected the livelihoods of farmers in Botswana resulting in low yield and financial losses. If not urgently controlled, the fall armyworm will detrimentally affect crop production resulting in the country being food insecure. The food insecurity will contribute to the food bill increasing significantly,” says Patrick Ralotsia. He said the outbreaks of pests like the fall armyworm represent a major obstacle to increased cereal production, food and nutrition security in Botswana and it is a challenge that has to be urgently addressed to improve agricultural production. Food security, nutrition security, employment opportunities,   economic development, trade and increased resilience to shocks and challenges are alleged to be what Botswana is increasing facing according to the minister. Understanding the disease in agriculture “The fall armyworm is new in Botswana and one of the key challenges farmers face is the lack of awareness and information. Effective dissemination of information of information on this pest is of paramount importance. Commercial chemical pesticides alone pose health risks to build up of pesticides resistance and higher economic losses,” says Minister of Agricultural Development and Food Security. Patrick Ralotsia says misinformed usage of chemical pesticides could result in the killing of potential indigenous natural enemies of the fall armyworm and other pests. The damages caused by fall armyworm and the use of pesticides...

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Séréhini: Après le Cyclone Kenneth
Mai07

Séréhini: Après le Cyclone Kenneth

Séréhini:  Après le Cyclone Kenneth Deux jours après le passage du cyclone Kenneth, les Comores se réveillent difficilement. Plusieurs habitations et récoltes sont détruites. Plus d’une dizaine de milliers de personnes sont touchées par le cyclone et 4 personnes sont décédées, selon les chiffres officiels.  A Séréhini,  à environ 6 kilomètres de la ville de Moroni, capitale des Comores,  un jeune homme est debout sur la route. Il fait très chaud. Le soleil brille à son Zénith.  Un autre jeune homme ,  casquette sur la tête,  est assis sur un banc en briques situé en face de la Présidence, la résidence secondaire du président des Comores construite dans les  années 80. Le taxi s’arrête et dépose des personnes. Il est 11h17.   Le jeune homme se lève.  Il  est accompagné par plusieurs jeunes hommes, les hommes se  dirigent vers des champs d’exploitation agricole. Il gère 10 champs loués  à des propriétaires vivant à Séréhini et dans la région pour un prix de 300 euros par champs et par an.  Il est le président de l’association d’agriculteurs Ujamaa. C’est la première fois qu’il subit une catastrophe naturelle.  A ce jour, il n’a reçu aucun soutien financier.  Une partie de ses récoltes est dévastée par le cyclone, notamment les bananeraies, cultures très appréciées par les comoriens,et très rentables. La destruction des bananeraies  est une perte énorme pour ce jeune homme de 32 ans, originaire d’Anjouan, l’île voisine située dans l’archipel des Comores. Monsieur Saifi, c’est son nom, travaille comme agriculteur à la Grande Comore depuis 13 ans. Il  a planté de nombreuses bananeraies dans les champs qu’il cultive.  Aux Comores, la population vit majoritairement de l’agriculture.  Les cultures vivrières et de rente sont abondantes, mais manquent d’usine de transformation et d’encadrement. Les Comores font partie des Pays les Moins Avancés au Monde.  L’installation de la bananeraie, de la cocoteraie,  mais aussi de taros  sous forêt naturelle est héritée de la colonisation. Il existe plusieurs espèces endémiques autour des bananeraies, plus particulièrement dans les forêts comoriennes.  Les Comores disposent d’un patrimoine faunistique méconnu au niveau international et son menacées depuis de nombreuses années par des problèmes environnementaux liés entre autres aux changements climatiques. Reportage. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache         Serehini1 (1)         Serehini2         lad_couvertedelaciterne   Monsieur Saifi vit à Vouvouni, une ville située au centre sud de Moroni, la capitale de l’Union des Comores. Chaque champs dispose d’une citerne qui permet d’arroser les cultures. Les perspectives Monsieur Saifi a été formé par un congolais de la République Démocratique du Congo qui travaillait au ministère de la production dans les années 80. Aujourd’hui cette personne est décédée, mais lui a permis d’apprendre à cultiver des cultures...

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