Nigerian Olumide Idowu becomes Youth Lead Author For Global Environment Outlook
Oct24

Nigerian Olumide Idowu becomes Youth Lead Author For Global Environment Outlook

Nigerian Olumide Idowu becomes Youth Lead Author For Global Environment Outlook By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   Olumide Idowu, a nigerian activist  has  been engaging youth in Nigeria and Africa in general for 10 years,  with making their voice to be heard both “offline and online” .  Last August, he was invited by the UN Environment office in Nairobi, Kenya to meet the UN Environment officials for proper integration and unveiling him as the Youth Author for Global Environment Outlook.He was  selected based as a Youth Lead Author For Global Environment Outlook on his commitment towards climate actions. The Global Environment Outlook (GEO) is UN Environment’s flagship integrated environmental assessment published every 4-5 years. It is intended to report on the state of the global environment, the extent and effectiveness of existing policy responses in addressing major environmental challenges and the prospects or outlook for the environment over the foreseeable future. GEO for Youth The GEO for Youth product is produced by, and adapted for, a youth audience from 15 to 25 years old. It is meant to stimulate dialogue within the youth community on environmental themes and issues, as well as to educate and provide capacity building tools to foster active youth commitment for achieving sustainable development. Olumide will be carrying out the following assignment as the Lead Author for GEO4Youth ·         Take The Overall Responsibility For Coordinating And Drafting Assigned Sections To Given Deadlines. ·         Actively Participate In The Geo-6 Communities Of Practice (Cop) And Work Closely With The Secretariat Staff To Provide Oversight Of The Cop Content; ·         Provide Leadership At Authors Meetings To Deliver Drafts For Each Section Of The Report; ·         Ensure That Manuscripts Are Completed To A High Standard, Collated And Delivered To The Secretariat In A Timely Manner And Conform To Un Environment-Provided Guidelines For Scientific Credibility; ·         Ensure That All Review Comments Are Dealt With According To Un Environment-Provided Specific Guidelines; ·         Develop Text That Is Scientifically And Technically Sound, And Socio-Economically Relevant Incorporating Contributions By A Wide Variety Of Experts And In Line With The Main Assessment; ·         Ensure That Any Crosscutting Scientific Or Technical Issues, Which May Involve Several Sections Of The Geo-6 For Youth Are Addressed In A Complete And Coherent Manner; ·         Take Responsibility For Referring To The Secretariat Any Scientific Credibility Issues, Such As Uncertainties And Use Of Grey Literature ·         Provide Oversight Of Educational And Advocacy Innovative Products In Support To The Main Assessment ·         Identifying Outreach Opportunities For The Geo For...

Read More
Blue Economy: NGOS call to speed controls on ships- (#MEPC73)
Oct22

Blue Economy: NGOS call to speed controls on ships- (#MEPC73)

Blue Economy: NGOS call to speed controls on ships- (#MEPC73)   10 Non Governmental Organizations (WWF, Whale and Dolphin Conservation , Environmental Investigation Agency, Seas at Risk…)  call  the International Maritime Organization   to speed controls on ships, ahead of the 73 session of the Marine Environment Protection Committee which be held in London today until October 26th. Open letter to Mr Hideaki Saito, Chair, Marine Environment Protection Committee, International Maritime Organization.   We the undersigned organizations wish to express our support for the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) in considering speed measures for shipping at its Marine Environment Policy Committee meeting (MEPC 73) starting October 22 in London. Speed controls on ships, determined and implemented by the IMO, would have multiple benefits. On climate change, managing the speed of ships, as is done in other transport sectors, would be a useful policy lever in cutting greenhouse gas emissions, with associated benefits for marine life. Air pollution, whether of SOx, NOx, particulate matter, or black carbon, could similarly be reduced. For whales and dolphins, slower ship speeds could reduce underwater noise pollution, and reduce incidents of whale strikes. For these reasons we urge IMO delegates to give the speed proposal due consideration, and decide on a timeline for an impact study before a decision on adoption. Speed could be a valuable tool in the IMO’s toolbox, for the climate, human health, and marine life....

Read More
Nouvelle prise de fonction pour Fatima Denton
Sep27

Nouvelle prise de fonction pour Fatima Denton

Nouvelle prise de fonction pour Fatima Denton Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   Depuis le 10 septembre dernier,  Fatima Denton est la nouvelle Directrice de l’Université des Nations Unies pour les Ressources Naturelles en Afrique.Elle est dorénavant à la tête de l’Institut qui contribue au développement durable, à la gestion et à la gouvernance des ressources naturelles renouvelables et non renouvelables en Afrique. Basé à Accra au Ghana, cet institut mène des recherches et des formations à travers un réseau structuré au Cameroun, en Côte d’Ivoire, en Namibie, au Sénégal, et en Zambie. Un espoir pour l’Afrique Cette nouvelle expérience pour Fatima Denton est porteuse d’espoirs, selon le l’Université des Nations Unies. « La nomination de Fatima Denton comme Directrice est une promesse de développement pour la famille entière de l’Université des Nations Unies, » a déclaré récemment le recteur et secrétaire adjoint de l’Université, David Malone.  Fatima Denton apportera, selon ses dires,  une expertise profonde dans la gestion des ressources naturelles en Afrique ainsi que des connaissances profondes dans la recherche et la politique de développement. «  En tant que nouvelle directrice de l’Université des Nations Unies pour les ressources naturelles en Afrique, je vais poursuivre l’important travail de mon prédécesseur, Dr Elias Ayuk, en encourageant les partenariats stratégiques et en développant de forts et réciproques liens avec de nouvelles parties prenantes, »  a déclaré Dr Denton lors de sa nomination en août dernier. Et d’ajouter : «  J’espère élaborer des politiques pertinentes,  des projets de recherches à impact élevé. » Qui est Fatima Denton ? Originaire de la Gambie, Fatima Denton est polyglotte. Elle parle notamment l’anglais et le Français. Elle est fonctionnaire des Nations Unies depuis de nombreuses années. De 2012 à 2018, elle a  occupé le  double poste de Directrice du département de gestion des ressources naturelles et coordinatrice du Centre africain pour la politique en matière de climat  à la Commission Economique pour l’Afrique ( CEA). Doctorante en sciences politiques, Mme Denton  a  auparavant travaillé au Danemark  comme  scientifique de l’énergie pour le Centre Risoe du Programme des Nations Unies pour l’Environnement ( ONU Environnement aujourd’hui). Le centre Risoe a pour objectif  d’intégrer les aspects environnementaux et de développement dans la planification énergétique au niveau de la politique mondiale, avec un accent spécifique dans  les pays en voie de développement. Dr Denton a aussi été chef du programme du Centre de Recherche International basé au Canada ( IDRC), dans lequel elle a dirigé des recherches percutantes notamment une recherche importante sur un programme d’adaptation aux changements climatiques porté par plus de 100 initiatives, dont  40 projets dans 33 pays d’Afrique. Elle a aussi travaillé comme gestionnaire de programme sur l’Energie au Sénégal pour...

Read More
New York Climate Week: “We need to recognize the urgency we face”- Patricia Espinosa
Sep25

New York Climate Week: “We need to recognize the urgency we face”- Patricia Espinosa

New York Climate Week: “We need to recognize the urgency we face”- Patricia Espinosa At the opening ceremony of New York Climate Week on monday 24th, the Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change, Patricia Espinosa, called for more urgency in taking climate action and stressed the need for leadership and a committed multilateral response. Her address   Seventhy-three years ago, nations—ravaged by war, weary of its costs—pledged to achieve what had, for the first half of the century, been impossible: a lasting peace. The signing of the UN Charter in San Francisco was more than an agreement to get along. It established a rules-based international order, championed multilateralism over self-interest, and clarified that the path forward was not through conflict but collaboration.We bear the fruit of that work. Today, many are healthier, better educated, and more peaceful than at any point in history.ut humanity faces a new challenge; one that threatens current and future generations. The Paris Agreement Climate change is an opponent we shaped with our own hands, but whose power now threatens to overwhelm us. Throughout the world, extreme heatwaves, wildfires, storms and floods are leaving a trail of devastation and death.Developing countries suffer the worst, but climate change affects all nations—directly and indirectly. It’s a challenge that a rules-based international order is custom-designed to address—which led to the Paris Agreement. Like the UN Charter itself, its signing was an unprecedented multilateral success. But nations are not living up to what they promised. Under it, nations agreed to limit climate change to 2-degrees Celsius—ideally 1.5C. These targets are the bare minimum to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. But what nations have currently pledged under Paris will bring the global temperature up about 3C by 2100. Let us be clear: low ambition leads to a future where humanity no longer controls its own fate—runaway climate change does. Recent negotiations in Bangkok on the Paris Agreement’s implementation guidelines made some progress, but not enough. Recognizing the urgency We must therefore work harder than ever between now and COP24 to complete this work. We need to see leadership, we need to recognize the urgency we face, and we need to make a commitment to a decisive multilateral response. We have no other option. This means that we must listen to the voices of billions who understand that time itself is a dwindling resource when it comes to climate change. We must listen also to those who understand that addressing climate change provides extraordinary opportunity and are acting. Just as 73 years ago the UN Charter was signed in San Francisco and then moved to New York City……we’ve also just arrived from...

Read More
Investir dans les solutions innovantes est une nécessité ( Conférence Ministérielle Africaine sur l’Environnement)
Sep17

Investir dans les solutions innovantes est une nécessité ( Conférence Ministérielle Africaine sur l’Environnement)

Investir dans les solutions innovantes est une nécessité ( Conférence Ministérielle Africaine sur l’Environnement) Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Nairobi, 17 Septembre 2018 – La Conférence Ministérielle Africaine sur l’Environnement s’est ouverte  ce lundi  à Nairobi (Kenya) et se terminera mercredi  21  Septembre. Principaux sujets de discussion: la promotion des solutions innovantes et des métiers durables. Les ministres africains exposeront ainsi pendant trois jours  leur stratégie de développement durable  et évoqueront le programme du prochain Sommet ministériel sur la biodiversité africaine. qui aura lieu en Egypte au mois de novembre prochain, avant la Conférence des Nations Unies sur la Biodiversité et avant la Conférence des Nations Unies sur le Climat prévue en Pologne au mois de décembre prochain. Le poids des ressources naturelles en Afrique D’après l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’Environnement, l’Afrique accueille 30% des réserves minérales mondiales,  environ 65% des terres arables.  Toujours, selon l’ONU, les ressources halieutiques africaines ne sont pas à négliger: elles  valent 24 milliards de dollars. Autre atout: la biodiversité. Le continent accueille la seconde plus grande forêt tropicale mondiale. Mais,  l’Afrique est vulnérable aux changements climatiques et subit une importante dégradation de ses écosystèmes. Le continent perd 68 milliards de dollars chaque année.  Les conséquences:  des pertes de plus de 6,6 million de tonnes de récoltes de céréales potentielles, qui pourraient nourrir plus de 31 millions de personnes.  La dégradation de ses écosystèmes provoquent de fait les pertes après récoltes, estimées à 48 milliards de dollars par an. Le manque d’accès à l’énergie Alors que le continent possède  10% de sources internes d’énergies renouvelables,  l’accès à l’énergie pour tous est difficile à atteindre en Afrique. Malgré les annonces en 2015, notamment  celle sur le programme d’accès à l’énergie des populations africaines pour que le continent puisse réaliser l’ambitieux Programme de développement durable à l’horizon 2030 adopté fin 2015 par les Nations unies.  Dernières données:  590 millions d’habitants en Afrique n’avaient pas accès à l’électricité en 2017, selon l’Agence Internationale de l’Energie Atomique. Depuis la COP 21, l’Afrique a mis en place un programme d’accès à l”Energie avec une annonce de  financement de  10 milliards de dollars. Cette initiative d’accès à l’énergie en Afrique a mis en place un portefeuille de projets et de programmes financés par des partenaires internationaux tels que l’Union Européenne, le Canada, l’Union Européenne, la France, l’Allemagne, l’Italie, le Japon, les Pays-Bas,  la Suède,  le Royaume-Uni et les États-Unis . Mais, le chemin est encore long, d’après certains observateurs.Le dernier rapport de l’AREI  ( l’Initiative de l’Afrique sur les Energies Renouvelables) sur la mise à jour de portefeuille de projets et de programmes indique qu’il existe des déséquilibres régionaux. La stratégie des ministres africains A quelques mois...

Read More