Africa-Environment: “we have to be very strong” Pacome Moubelet Boubeya (AMCEN)
Jan27

Africa-Environment: “we have to be very strong” Pacome Moubelet Boubeya (AMCEN)

Africa-Environment: “we have to be very strong” Pacome Moubelet Boubeya (AMCEN) On the sidelne of  the  3rd United Nations Environment Assembly held at the end of last year,  Era Environnement was part of a press conference held by  the minister of Forestry and Environment of Gabon, Pacome Moubelet Boubeya, who  is also the  president of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment ( AMCEN).  Mr Pacome Moubelet Boubeya gave his view on the significant role that  (AMCEN) plays on the continent and in the world. Interview by Wandile Kalippa in Kenya Era Environnement: Do you think Africa is ready to walk the talk on pollution, in view of the contrasting realities of ecosystem pollution by oil companies in Central Africa and Nigeria, and West Africa particularly, Nigeria and Gabon to be exact? Pacome Moubelet Boubeya: We have a big challenge. We have a challenge of developing our countries, of financing that development, of creating jobs and wealth to our countries, but we have a greater challenge even that of making sure that in the development strategies that we are taking we are not going to be destroying our own countries because of the exploitation of oil for instance, so, we have to be very aware of that and we have to adapt our development ambitions to what the reality is going to be tomorrow. If we do not do so now that the West is making and taking every effort for them to align with what they believe tomorrow is going to be. If we do not do anything today, it means that tomorrow we will be once again twenty of fifty years late, if we can compare with the West. So, we have a challenge. The challenge is to as I was saying to create wealth, give jobs to our people in the case of Nigeria and in the case of Gabon as well, you see that our population is very young and if we foresee the increase in population, let us say in Nigeria we can see that within the next twenty – twenty five, fifty years the population of Nigeria is going to increase by something like twenty five or thirty five percent, and we need to adapt our environment , global environment with the increase of population that we are going to have to make sure that we have the means and wealth to take care of these people as well. But maintaining what we have the most permanent in our countries which is our earth, our environment and we have to do whatever we have to, to protect, it means what? It means we have to...

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The Paris Agreement : Meaningless for Africa
Juin03

The Paris Agreement : Meaningless for Africa

The Paris Agreement : Meaningless for Africa ( Civil Society) The Paris Climate Agreement signed by representatives of over 175 nations, including South Africa, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York on April 22, is meaningless for Africa, according to environmental justice organisation groundWork. This Civil Society, based in South Africa is working with community people from around South Africa, and increasingly Southern Africa. For its Director, Bobby Peek, the commitments made in Paris were too late and too weak. This means that the hope to keep the temperature increase to below 1.5 degrees has been overshot. « The ‘fair share’ is what each country should do to keep the world within the limited and declining carbon budget; looking at how much more greenhouse gas can be put into the atmosphere before exceeding 1.5°C. The climate science is clear that breaching the 1.5 degree guardrail poses an unacceptable risk of crossing irreversible tipping points, impacting billions of people,” Groundwork organization explained ahead of the signing ceremony in New York. But there is a positive future for climate change according to the NGO. « At a local level to combat climate change there needs to be a just transition from fossil fuel based energy to renewable energy, which is locally owned by the people who use it. The alternative to fossil fuel based energy production is renewable energy like sun and wind power that does not rely on dirty and destructive practices of extraction and combustion, and does not pollute people’s health and environment, » Groundwork said earlier. Listen to the interview of Bobby Peek By Wandile Kallipa...

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Africa still trapped deepening rhino poaching
Mar17

Africa still trapped deepening rhino poaching

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has released early march a report on deepening rhino poaching crisis in Africa. At least 1,338 rhinos were killed by poachers across the continent in 2015. By Wandile Kallipa Several African rhinos were killed by poachers for the sixth years, indicates an International Union for Conservation of Nature’s report. A least 1,338 rhinos were killed across Africa in 2015, according to a deep  analysis compiled by International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Species Survival Commission’s African Rhino Specialist Group (AfRSG). « One of the most important things that the countries in Africa must realize it is that the wildlife crime and the poaching of Rhinos is not a wildlife crime, it’s an economic crime, » says Mike Knight, Chair of IUCN’s Africa Rhino Specialist Group ( AfRSG).« Because it’s been organized by transnational organised crime networks, » he adds. South East Asia is criticized for this current crisis which is the highest. Indeed, since 2008, poachers have killed at least 5, 5,940 African rhinos, noted the report. In 2015, South Africa lost around US$25 million from the Rhinos killed illegally, according to the report. However, in countries such as Kenya, poaching has declined, for the first time since 2008.  For Mr Knight, increasing  law enforcement and solidarity between countries can eliminate illegal hunting. We can’t solve this issue nationally. We have to do it through cooperation, internationally, particulary, regionally. We have to make sure that our governments are talking to each other, » he urges.  Listen to the interview       RHINO_CRISIS.mp3 Wandile Kallipa is senior  a journalist from South Africa. He is currently working at Channel Africa ( SABC) as a senior radio journalist, dealing with environmental issues. He studied mostly in Bucharest. He has a Bachelor of Art in Journalism, obtained in the Academia Stefan Gheorghiu in 1985. He worked then for Radio Freedom, the Voice of the African National Congress Broadcasting from Radio Tanzania in Dar Es Salaam. A few years later, he joined the Zambian Broadcasting Corporation for Radio Freedom. In 1998, he  went back to Romania for further studies where he studied Law at the University of Bucharest Faculty of Law. He Graduated in 1991, obtaining an M.A. At Law Degree. Upon his return to South Africa, he joined the South African Broadcasting Corporation’s external service in 1997. Journaliste spécialiste des questions d’environnement, Wandile Kalippa, est basé en Afrique du Sud. Fin connaisseur des problématiques environnementales et scientifiques,  Wandile  exerce depuis plus de 30 ans à la radio. Journaliste senior à Channel Africa à la South African Broadcasting Corporation ( SABC), Wandile possède un master de droit et d’une licence  de journalisme,...

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