World Rhino Day : there are now just 4,800 black rhino individuals left in the wild-UN ENVIRONMENT
Sep22

World Rhino Day : there are now just 4,800 black rhino individuals left in the wild-UN ENVIRONMENT

World Rhino Day : there are now just 4,800 black rhino individuals left in the wild-UN ENVIRONMENT By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   About 96 percent  of black rhinos were lost to large-scale poaching between 1970 and 1992, according to UN Environment. Although numbers have recovered since, today there are now just 4,800 black rhino individuals left in the wild. Rhino populations and sub-species have disappeared entirely from several Asian and African countries in recent years recalled the UN Environment. In 2011, the Western Black Rhino was declared extinct, and there is only a single surviving individual of the Northern white rhino. International Trade is strictly prohibited. All five species of rhinos, two in Africa and three in Asia are included in CITES  (Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species). One of the targets of Sustainable Development Goal 15 is to: “Take urgent action to end poaching and trafficking of protected species of flora and fauna and address both demand and supply of illegal wildlife products.”...

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Climate Change in Tanzania: Farmers are Waiting for solutions
Sep21

Climate Change in Tanzania: Farmers are Waiting for solutions

Climate Change in Tanzania:  Farmers are waiting for solutions By Deodatus Mfugale* The farmers in Nyamwage village in Tanzania are facing two challenges:  changing climate and a new disease is affecting the rice crops. The rainfall patten is a real problem in this village. Sometimes it rains unexpectedly: in June, while the rainy season had lond ended in the area and farmers had just harvested their crops , part of the crops was destroyed by “out-of -season rainfall”. These farmers do not know where to find alternatives and they feel left behind.         Deodatus Mfugale is an experienced freelance environmental journalist based in Dar es Salaam Tanzania. He is a media consultant/trainer specializing in environment, climate change, extractives industry and investigative journalism. He works on voluntary basis with the Journalists Environmental Association Of Tanzania (JET) in the areas of writing features, editing and conducting short term training sessions. Currently, he writes as a correspondent for Daily News and The Guardian newspapers, two Tanzanian newspapers. But he was formerly employed by The Guardian Ltd where he served as a news editor, and a features editor before he resigned in 2009. He is now a Board Memberof Shahidi wa Maji (Water Witness). Between 2012 and 2014. He served as a Member to the Advisory Committee of the Climate Change Research, Education and Outreach Programme of the University of Dar es Salaam. He has attended many climate change meetings and other international...

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Consequences of ozone depletion
Sep20
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COP 23- Action climatique: “Nous sommes au début d’une nouvelle ère” – Hakima El Haité
Sep11

COP 23- Action climatique: “Nous sommes au début d’une nouvelle ère” – Hakima El Haité

COP 23- Action climatique: “Nous sommes au début d’une nouvelle ère” – Hakima El Haité Ancienne Ministre de l’Environnement du Maroc, Hakima El Haité est actuellement l’envoyée spéciale du Royaume chérifien pour la COP 22. Nommée il y a un an championne de haut niveau pour le climat, elle décrit ses différentes actions, notamment celles sur le sommet des territoires  à Agadir  (Maroc) qui s’ouvre aujourd’hui. Entretien.    Propos recueillis par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Vous êtes l’une des actrices principales du sommet des territoires Climate Chance à Agadir. Qu’attendez-vous de cet événement ? Mobiliser, mobiliser et mobiliser. Ce rendez-vous est comme lors de ses éditions précédentes, destiné à rassembler, à partager ensemble les expériences, les bonnes pratiques, les espoirs et puiser l’énergie pour aller plus vite et plus loin. A Marrakech, les acteurs non étatiques ont d’une certaine manière créé l’événement. Rappelez-vous, la Cop 22 s’était ouverte sur l’annonce de l’élection de Donald Trump et les craintes qu’elle suscitait.  Depuis, ces craintes se sont concrétisées par l’annonce au printemps de la volonté de retrait des Etats-Unis de l’Accord de Paris. Contrairement à ce que nous aurions pu craindre, les acteurs non étatiques ont été plutôt galvanisés par cette difficulté politique. C’est grâce à eux que l’on peut parler désormais des nouvelles Conférences des Nations Unies sur le climat “duales” crées par l’Accord de Paris : celle de la négociation entre Etats, et celle de tous les autres acteurs qui agissent sur le terrain. Mais attention, leur efficacité est extrêmement tributaire de la capacité des Etats à mettre en place des politiques de long terme cohérentes avec la transition énergétique. A Agadir, nous sommes là pour construire des points entre le Sud et le Nord, encourager les acteurs non étatiques africains à rejoindre les coalitions mondiales. Nous avons par ailleurs suscité à Agadir un sommet des coalitions, les 13 et le 14 septembre pour nous assurer de la cohérence de ce que nous présenterons lors des journées thématiques de la COP 23, qu’il s’agisse des forêts, d’industrie, de l’océan et du yearbook. Ce sera une étape de travail essentielle pour réussir cette nouvelle COP. Avec un accent particulier sur la diffusion au-delà de l’enceinte onusienne de notre travail. Le grand public doit connaître notre action. Les décideurs économiques aussi. Les médias également. Cette connexion est une des clés de l’accélération de l’action climatique. C’est pour cela qu’à Bonn, nous allons insister sur deux points : le yearbook comme nouvel outil de travail pour les Parties et boussole des acteurs non étatiques et la diffusion du travail des coalitions sur tous les canaux, médias et réseaux sociaux compris. Vous avez récemment à Paris examiné le processus...

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Linking extreme weather to climate change- Scientists
Sep09

Linking extreme weather to climate change- Scientists

As we are watching with concern the unfolding extreme weather events around the globe today and in recent weeks, the relationship of these extremes to the underlying trend of climate change is being discussed by scientists. The Science Media Centre in London, UK has been collating some of these expert views. These comments are also available on the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Newsroom website.   Dr Adrian Champion, of the University of Exeter, said: “The occurrence of two category five hurricanes in the same season hasn’t been known to happen since records began. “It’s difficult to predict whether Irma will continue to strengthen – they get their energy from warm oceans and, given it’s already made landfall, you could expect it to weaken – but now it’s passing over the ocean again it could re-intensify. “The question regarding whether Jose will develop into a category five hurricane is mixed. Given that Irma has just passed through, there isn’t as much ‘energy’ to intensify Jose. However, the conditions are similar. “The climate change projections are that we’ll get fewer, but more intense, cyclones in the future.” Dr Ilan Kelman, Reader in Risk Resilience and Global Health at University College London, said: “As the scale of devastation from Hurricane Irma emerges, once post-disaster needs are met, we can ask about readiness. The islands which were hit knew they were in a hurricane zone and many run drills every year to be prepared for the hurricane season. In places, it appears to have saved lives. But we always want to strive to help everyone–and to be ready beforehand to reconstruct as soon as the storm has passed.” Dr Chris Holloway, tropical storm expert at the University of Reading, said: “Hurricane Irma is a potentially life-threatening storm for the Caribbean islands and neighbouring Leeward Islands due to winds up to 185 mph and storm surge up to 11 feet with large swells on top of this. The storm is likely to maintain very strong intensity (category 4 or 5) over the next three days, probably staying just north of the Greater Antilles but still a potential threat to Puerto Rico and Hispaniola. After that, the forecast track becomes more uncertain, with the storm likely affecting the Bahamas and Florida over the weekend. “Since the storm will begin to turn more towards the north in about five days, but the exact timing of this turn is uncertain, all of the Florida peninsula, the Bahamas, Cuba, and the Carolinas and Georgia should be prepared for a possible landfall or other effects of a severe hurricane.  The main dangers with this storm are storm surge and...

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