COP 23 : Angola is combating Coal with 19 nations
Nov18

COP 23 : Angola is combating Coal with 19 nations

COP 23 : Angola is combating Coal with 19 nations Following the High level Segment, held this Wednesday, Angola shows its interest to combat coal with an Alliance of 19 nations.  Demonstration. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   On  Thursday, Angola with other Nations such as the UK, Canada, Costa Rica, France, Belgium,  France, Italy, Marshall Islands, Portugal, el Salvador, US and Canadian states  (Washington, Alberta…). pledged to commit to moving the world from burning coal to cleaner power sources, through the Powering Past Coal Alliance plans. The ambition of this Alliance is to lead the rest of the world in committing to an end to use coal poser. They are going to take action such as setting coal phase out targets, committing to not further investments in coal-fired electricity in their jurisdictions or abroad. The minister of Environment Paula Francisco, head of the delegation of Angola has explained, on Wednesday during the high level segment  at UN Climate Conference in Bonn, how the Angola is engaged in the process of adopting a National Climate Action Plan from 2018 to 2030. Its ambitions: contributing to poverty eradication with a low carbon development strategy. Angola said its willing to implement the Paris Agreement collectively. “ As we progress toward 2020, it is imperative that we take stock of the actions we have collectively taken in accordance with the decisions and commitments made, ” she said during the high level Segment at the UN Climate Change Conference. Mrs Francisco  raised concerns on the large gap between the levels of ambition needed to reach the long term temperature goal of limiting temperature rise to 1,5°Celsius above pre industrial levels and said that the action should be taken collectively and not individually. “While we are encouraged by the fact that 170 Parties have ratified the Paris Agreement, ratification alone will not bridge the gap. Further gaps exist in the level of financial flows and access to technology to developing countries, as our ability to act is limited by access to adequate means of implementation,” she emphasized.    ...

Read More
COP 23: A fellowship programme launched for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries
Nov17

COP 23: A fellowship programme launched for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries

COP 23: A fellowship programme for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries   A new one year  Programme titled “Capacity Award Programme to Advance Capabilities and Institutional Training  (CAPACITY) will be implemented by the Government of Italy and UN Climate Change. Explanations. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache The  Government of Italy and UN Climate Change have signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to launch a new Fellowship Programme aimed at strengthening the institutional capacity of the Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) to respond to the challenges arising from climate change. How will it work? It will support innovative analytical work on climate change in the context of sustainable development, promote a network of experts who can bring creating and innovative options to bear on questions of climate change, encourage the leadership potential of young and promising professionals in the fields. For  Patricia Espinosa, UN Climate Change Executive Secretary, this programme “marks an important step forward in our endeavor to ensure widest possible support to SIDS and LDC countries to combat climate change and help them build institutional capacity to resilience to climate impacts.” The government of Italy will provide support to launch this fellowship programme, according to Mrs Espinosa. Italy has agreed to provide a funding of 2,500,000 euros for the fellowship programme, which will initially be launched for a period for five years. Adaptation to climate change  in developing countries is crucial to enable these countries to Pursure the common objectives of developed and developing countries for sustainable development in a climate-friendly manner, said Gian Luca Galletti, the Italian Minister of the Environment, Land and Sea.   Who can have access to this programme?   SIDS and LDC mid-career professionals who are working in a broad range of national, regional, and local governmental organizations, ranging from educational institutions, research institutes and ministries are the target of this programme. Italy has agreed to provide a funding of 2,500,000 euros for the fellowship programme, which will initially be launched for a period for five years.   Annually, up to five one year fellowships will be awarded that can be further extended by one year. Selected fellows will have the opportunity to gain exposure to a wide range of opportunities available the UN Climate Change Secretariat in Bonn, Germany. They will be able to work on projects relating to the Paris Agreement, including Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), global climate action agenda, finance, legal, regulatory and institutional framework....

Read More
COP 23: “no time to waste”
Nov07

COP 23: “no time to waste”

 The 2017 UN Climate Change Conference opened on Monday, with the aim of launching nations towards the next level of ambition needed to tackle global warming and put the world on a safer and more prosperous development path, recalled the UNFCCC Secretariat at the opening ceremony. Explanations. By Houmi AHAMED-MIKIDACHE in Bonn   Two years after the adoption of the Paris Climate Change Agreement, this conference held in Bonn and presided by Fiji, the first small island developing state to have this role. “The human suffering caused by intensifying hurricanes, wildfires, droughts, floods and threats to food security caused by climate change means there is no time to waste,” said Mr Frank Bainimarama, the Prime Minister of Fiji and president of COP 23. Critical According to the World Meteorological Organization, 2017 will be one of the three hottest years on records with many high-impact events including catastrophic hurricanes and floods, debilating heatwaves and drought. “The past three years have all been in the top three years in terms of temperature records. This is part of a long term warming trend,” said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas. And he added:  “We have witnessed extraordinary weather, including temperatures topping 50 degrees Celsius in Asia, record-breaking hurricanes in rapid succession in the Caribbean and Atlantic reaching as far as Ireland, devastating monsoon flooding affecting many millions of people and a relentless drought in East Africa. One of the consequences of climate change is food insecurity in developing countries especially. A review of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) found that, in developing countries, agriculture (crops, livestock, fisheries, aquaculture and forestry) accounted for 26% of all the damage and loss associated with medium to large-scale storms, floods and drought. For Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change, it is urgent to act. “The thermometer of risk is rising; the pulse of the planet is racing; people are hurting; the window of opportunity is closing and we must go Further and Faster Together to lift ambition and action to the next defining level, “she said. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the global health impacts of heatwaves depend not only on the overall warming trend, but on how heatwaves are distributed across where people live. Recent research shows that the overall risk of heat-related illness or death has climbed steadily since 1980, with around 30% of the world’s population now living in climatic conditions that deliver prolonged extreme heatwaves. Between 2000 and 2016, the number of vulnerable people exposed to heatwave events has increased by approximately 125 million. The negotiations According to UNFCCC secretariat, COP23 negotiators are keen to move forward on other...

Read More
The November UN Climate Conference: an opportunity to integrate risk management- Column
Oct11

The November UN Climate Conference: an opportunity to integrate risk management- Column

  The November UN Climate Conference: an opportunity to integrate risk management- Column By, Patricia Espinosa, Achim Steiner and Robert Glasser* From Miami and Puerto Rico to Barbuda and Havana, the devastation of this year’s hurricane season across Latin America and the Caribbean serves as a reminder that the impacts of climate change know no borders. In recent weeks, Category 5 hurricanes have brought normal life to a standstill for millions in the Caribbean and on the American mainland. Harvey, Irma and Maria have been particularly damaging. The 3.4 million inhabitants of Puerto Rico have been scrambling for basic necessities including food and water, the island of Barbuda has been rendered uninhabitable, and dozens of people are missing or dead on the UNESCO world heritage island of Dominica. The impact is not confined to this region. The record floods across Bangladesh, India and Nepal have made life miserable for some 40 million people.  More than 1,200 people have died and many people have lost their homes, crops have been destroyed, and many workplaces have been inundated. Meanwhile, in Africa, over the last 18 months 20 countries have declared drought emergencies, with major displacement taking place across the Horn region. For those countries that are least developed the impact of disasters can be severe, stripping away livelihoods and progress on health and education; for developed and middle-income countries the economic losses from infrastructure alone can be massive; for both, these events reiterate the need to act on a changing climate that threatens only more frequent and more severe disasters. A (shocking) sign of things to come? The effects of a warmer climate on these recent weather events, both their severity and their frequency, has been revelatory for many, even the overwhelming majority that accept the science is settled on human-caused global warming. While the silent catastrophe of 4.2 million people dying prematurely each year from ambient pollution, mostly related to the use of fossil fuels, gets relatively little media attention, the effect of heat-trapping greenhouse gases on extreme weather events is coming into sharper focus. It could not be otherwise when the impacts of these weather events are so profound. During the last two years over 40 million people, mainly in countries which contribute least to global warming, were forced either permanently or temporarily from their homes by disasters. There is clear consensus: rising temperatures are increasing the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere, leading to more intense rainfall and flooding in some places, and drought in others. Some areas experience both, as was the case this year in California, where record floods followed years of intense drought. TOPEX/Poseidon, the first satellite to precisely...

Read More
Consequences of ozone depletion
Sep20
Read More

En continuant à utiliser le site, vous acceptez l’utilisation des cookies. Plus d’informations

Les paramètres des cookies sur ce site sont définis sur « accepter les cookies » pour vous offrir la meilleure expérience de navigation possible. Si vous continuez à utiliser ce site sans changer vos paramètres de cookies ou si vous cliquez sur "Accepter" ci-dessous, vous consentez à cela.

Fermer