Benin- African Carbon Forum: African countries must work closer together
Juin30

Benin- African Carbon Forum: African countries must work closer together

Benin- African Carbon Forum: African countries must work closer together Cotonou-Benin- 30 June 2017 By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache African countries must work closer together when implementing national climate action plans under the Paris Climate Change Agreement and mobilizing climate finance, whilst better integrating climate action into sustainable development planning, concluded ministers and key delegates who convened for the Africa Carbon Forum which ended today in Cotonou, Benin. Over 600 practitioners, experts and policy makers, including ministers from governments across Africa and other high level participants, met in Cotonou to take stock and align strategies on how financial resources should be mobilized to ensure sustainable development and emissions reduction on a continent-wide scale. “Africa is the continent most affected by climate change: two thirds of Africans make their living off the land, consequently, it is critical that the continent secures a climate-resilient economic and development path, said Abdoulaye Bio Tchane, Senior Minister in charge of Planning and Development of Benin, a western african country which host the Africa Carbon Forum. Foster economic growth With ambitious commitments already made by countries under the Paris Agreement, and with more commitments expected, African ministers and other leaders stressed the importance of building momentum that will enable the transformational shift towards low carbon and greater resilience to climate change. Patnerships are needed to develop and spur sustainable development, participants also highlighted. “Africa is one of the most important engines for growth worldwide in the coming years. African people are at the core of this growth. But the growth needs to be shaped on the basis of related climate and sustainable development criteria,” explained the Executive Secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Patricia Espinosa. And she added: “Africa’s nationally determined contributions to the agreement are blueprints for attracting private sector investment and pushing forward. Implementation of the Paris Agreement is the foundation for stability, for security and prosperity as the population grows to 9 billion people or more by 2050.”With food, water, renewable energy, jobs, African can build sustainable, resilient communities, she emphasized. The non State Actors Delegates at this year’s Africa Carbon Forum confirmed that non-Party stakeholders, including private sector and cities, stand ready to enhance ambition on climate action and welcomed the event as a unique regional event, which facilitates knowledge and new partnerships which are key to allowing Africa to realize its potential and meet the ambitions goals set in the Paris agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Delegates discussed crucial themes ranging from climate policy options to the future of the existing and widely use mechanisms that are suitable to the different domestic context and can be...

Read More
DECLARATION OF THE FIRST AFRICA ACTION SUMMIT FOR CONTINENTAL CO-EMERGENCE
Nov17

DECLARATION OF THE FIRST AFRICA ACTION SUMMIT FOR CONTINENTAL CO-EMERGENCE

DECLARATION OF THE FIRST AFRICA ACTION SUMMIT FOR CONTINENTAL CO-EMERGENCE By African heads of State We, the African Heads of State and Government, meeting in Marrakesh on 16 November 2016, at the invitation of His Majesty Mohammed VI, King of Morocco, for the First Africa Action Summit, held on the sidelines of the 22nd Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP22) stress that: – Africa, which has contributed the least to global greenhouse gas emissions, is the continent most affected by climate change and its impacts on its territories, the consequences of which may jeopardize peace, security and sustainable development in Africa; – African regions have voluntarily launched adaptation and mitigation initiatives with a view to enhancing resilience and promoting sustainable development; reaffirm: – the importance of adequate implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals, based on the Rio principles, particularly that of “common but differentiated responsibilities” to rise to the challenge of climate change; – the concrete and substantial commitment of African countries to contribute to global efforts to combat climate change; – our ambition to make climate action a lever of emergence in order to build an inclusive, sustainable development model that meets the legitimate aspirations of African populations and safeguards the interests of future generations; – our desire to work together collectively towards an Africa that is resilient to climate change and that shapes its destiny, through sub-regional and regional approaches; Commit to: – promoting the adaptation measures and policies required, making sure they also serve as catalysts for profound economic and social structural transformation in Africa;   – consolidating our respective commitments to tackle the effects of climate change in order to give more coherence to our strategies and move forward together; – speeding up the implementation of initiatives that have already been identified or launched, not only by building on our own resources, but also by mobilizing multilateral and bilateral donors as well as non-state actors. These include: * initiatives aimed at enhancing our continent’s resilience to the threats of climate change, in particular the “Africa Adaptation Initiative”, the “Adaptation of African Agriculture” initiative, known as “Triple A”, the “Great Green Wall for the Sahara and the Sahel” project, the “Security, Stability and Sustainability” initiative, the “Rural Resilience” initiative and the “Forests in the Mediterranean Region and the Sahel” initiative; * initiatives in favor of an African sustainable co-emergence, in particular the “Africa Renewable Energy Initiative”, the “Conservation of the Lake Chad Basin Ecosystem”, the “Blue Growth” initiative, the “African Clean Energy Corridor” and the “Blue Fund for the Congo Basin” ; – encouraging and facilitating the participation...

Read More
COP 22: Plaidoyer Africain pour une co-émergence continentale
Nov16

COP 22: Plaidoyer Africain pour une co-émergence continentale

COP 22: Plaidoyer Africain pour une co-émergence continentale Lors du premier sommet africain sur la co-émergence continentale, les Chefs d’Etat africains, invités par le Roi du Maroc, Mohamed VI, en marge de la 22ème Conférence des Parties de la Convention-Cadre des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques (COP22), ont  réaffirmé  leur priorités, engagements, et sollicitations. Déclaration. Par les chefs d’Etat Africains. Les priorités Lors du premier sommet africain sur la co-émergence continentale, les Chefs d’Etat africains, invités par le Roi du Maroc, Mohamed VI, en marge de la 22ème Conférence des Parties de la Convention-Cadre des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques (COP22), ont  réaffirmé  4 priorités: – l’importance d’une mise en œuvre adéquate des Objectifs de Développement Durable, fondés sur les principes de Rio, en particulier celui de «la responsabilité commune mais différenciée », pour relever le défi du changement climatique ; – l’engagement concret et substantiel des pays africains à contribuer à l’effort mondial de lutte contre les changements climatiques ; – leur ambition de faire de l’action pour le climat un levier d’émergence, en vue de construire un modèle de développement inclusif et durable répondant aux aspirations légitimes des populations africaines et préservant les intérêts des générations futures ; – leur volonté d’œuvrer collectivement et solidairement pour une Afrique résiliente au changement climatique et qui façonne son destin, à travers des approches sous régionales et régionales Ils ont ensemble souligné la vulnérabilité de l’Afrique face aux changements climatiques et les conséquences des dérèglements climatiques au niveau mondial telles que la  menace sur la paix et la  sécurité. L’Afrique compte 54 Etats dont 6 Petits Etats Insulaires en développement et une trentaine d’états côtiers. Les Engagements Les dirigeants africains s’engagent à  promouvoir les politiques et les mesures en matière d’adaptation requises, qui soient aussi des catalyseurs pour une transformation structurelle profonde sur les plans économique et social en Afrique. Ils se disent prêts à  consolider nos engagements respectifs en matière de lutte contre les effets du changement climatique, pour donner davantage de cohérence à nos stratégies et avancer ensemble. Et ils affirment leur ferme volonté d’accélérer la réalisation des initiatives déjà identifiées ou lancées, en s’appuyant non seulement sur leurs ressources intrinsèques mais également en mobilisant les bailleurs de fonds, multilatéraux et bilatéraux ainsi que les acteurs non étatiques. Quelles sont les initiatives? Il s’agit de la résilience du continent face  aux menaces du dérèglement climatique. Les actions sont multiples:   L’Initiative Africaine pour l’Adaptation », l’initiative pour « l’Adaptation de l’Agriculture Africaine », connue sous l’acronyme « Triple A », le projet de la « Grande Muraille Verte pour le Sahara et le Sahel», l’initiative pour...

Read More
COP 22- Sommet Africain à Marrakech- Comores : Premier Etat à reconnaître la Déclaration Universelle des Droits de l’Humanité
Nov16

COP 22- Sommet Africain à Marrakech- Comores : Premier Etat à reconnaître la Déclaration Universelle des Droits de l’Humanité

COP 22- Sommet Africain à Marrakech- Comores : Premier Etat à reconnaître la Déclaration Universelle des Droits de l’Humanité   Marrakech- En marge du Sommet Africain, le président de l’Union des Comores Azali Assoumani a signé la Déclaration Universelle des Droits de l’Humanité. Personnalités présentes  :  Corinne Le Page, coordinatrice de la Déclaration, Anthony Lecren, membre du gouvernement de Nouvelle-Calédonie, en charge de l’Environnement et des Affaires Coutumières, et  Bran Quinquis, délégué interministériel au dérèglement climatique de Polynésie Française ainsi que des membres de l’ONG française Green Cross.Analyse Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Comment est née  la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme ? Née en en 2015 à Paris, à l’instar de la « Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme » de 1948, la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’humanité », prend en compte la ” dimension éthique” résultant de la dignité, de la singularité , de la vulnérabilité et de la responsabilité de chaque être humain. Autres priorités: l’urgence des risques encourus, la solidarité  et la responsabilité qui lie les êtres humains, la confiance dans l’inventivité, l’adaptabilité. La déclaration des droits de l’homme ,adoptée par l’ONU au XXe siècle,  est née pour   reconstruire et réaffirmer le respect dû à tout individu, quelle que soit son origine, ou son statut social.  La déclaration universelle des droits de l’humanité est, elle,  issue  d’un autre constat:  l’enjeu de  confronter les périls  globaux aux opportunités de progrès. “Les droits et devoirs de l’humanité instaurent un devoir qui nous incombe à tous, individuellement et collectivement, pour contribuer à assurer la pérennité de l’humanité,” souligne le texte. L’impasse Hier lors du Segment de Haut Niveau, le président de l’Union des Comores Azali Assoumani a souligné sa volonté de relever les défis liés aux changements climatiques avec la communauté internationale. Dans leur contribution nationale présentée lors de la COP 21, les Comores ont présenté un plan ambitieux:  une réduction d’émissions de Gaz à effet de Serre de 84% d’ici 2030. Pourtant les Comores font partie des Pays Insulaires en Développement. Pour réaliser leur projets de développement sobre en carbone, les Comores ont sollicité  675 millions de dollars, dont une partie sera dédiée aux actions d’atténuation, de réduction de gaz à effet de serre et une autre à celles d’adaptation aux changements climatiques, liées aux actions de prévention et de lutte contre les aléas climatiques. Le fonds vert devrait être la principale source. A ce jour, ce fonds n’est doté que de 10 milliards de dollars. La question du financement de  l’adaptation, problématique depuis le début des négociations, n’a toujours pas été résolue. L’accord de Paris, entrée en vigueur le 4 novembre dernier, a été pourtant ratifié par 110...

Read More
COP 22: Why Marrakesh Is More Important Than Paris COP21? – Olumide Idowu
Oct31

COP 22: Why Marrakesh Is More Important Than Paris COP21? – Olumide Idowu

COP 22: Why Marrakesh Is More Important Than Paris COP21? COP 22 will be held in Marrakesh, Morocco, from 7 to 18 November 2016. COP 20 in Lima was tagged the COP of negotiations of a universal climate change agreement, COP 21 in Paris last year was a COP of Agreement while COP 22 in Morocco is tagged the COP of Implementation. Taking critical decisions to ensure the implementation of the Paris Agreement is the major endeavor at COP 22 in Morocco. Last year, African Development Bank support contributed significantly to ensuring that Africa’s concerns were addressed in the Paris Agreement. The Bank has also committed to triple its climate change finance to about USD 5 billion per year and to provide USD 12 billion on renewable energy investments by 2020. In consistence with the New Deal on Energy for Africa that provides a good entry point for the implementation of the Paris Agreement, and given that COP 22 is a key milestone for the implementation of that Agreement, it is important that Africa is fully on board, while ensuring linkages with the Bank’s High Fives. “To make the Paris Agreement a real-world success story we need more than a historic political agreement, we need practical climate action to “decouple GDP from GHG” – or economic growth from greenhouse gases – as UN climate chief Christiana Figureres put it during a lecture at Climate-KIC partner the Grantham Institute.” Fours ways Marrakesh is going to help achieve that: Going from National to Global Action Plans is very important: In the run up to Paris, countries submitted their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Now, they are preparing their first climate action plans (NDCs) – dropping the ‘Intended’ from the title – which will be updated every five years and should represent an increase in ambition. This is the often cited ‘ratcheting’ mechanism built into the Paris Agreement. In Marrakesh, countries will hope to agree on how the stock-taking exercise should work every five years, and how they can make sure it will indeed ratchet up the level of ambition around the world. The action plans outline the post-2020 climate actions of each country and contain details such as emission-reduction targets and how governments plan to make those happen. A range of policies, including those addressing the aviation and maritime sectors (which are missing from the Paris Agreement), need to be drawn up and implemented to create what is often called the “enabling environment” for the transition to a low-carbon economy.   Making Measuring Progress Transparent will keep the commitment: Perhaps even more important, are...

Read More

En continuant à utiliser le site, vous acceptez l’utilisation des cookies. Plus d’informations

Les paramètres des cookies sur ce site sont définis sur « accepter les cookies » pour vous offrir la meilleure expérience de navigation possible. Si vous continuez à utiliser ce site sans changer vos paramètres de cookies ou si vous cliquez sur "Accepter" ci-dessous, vous consentez à cela.

Fermer