AFDB: Africa needs to accelerate private sector investment in infrastructure
Juil22

AFDB: Africa needs to accelerate private sector investment in infrastructure

AFDB: Africa needs to accelerate private sector investment in infrastructure By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   The Kenyan Urgent call President Uhuru Kenyatta has made an urgent call for developing and funding bankable infrastructure projects to drive Africa’s growth agenda during the Africa50 General shareholders Meeting held in Nairobi, Kenya. President Kenyatta said support for bankable projects in energy, transport, ICT, water and sanitation provide unprecedented opportunities for private sector participation. “The private sector must step up and help us close the infrastructure gap on the African continent. Public funding is limited, and there are competing priorities,” he said. Kenyatta announced Kenya would double its current shareholding investment in Africa50 to US$ 100 million. “We must have the confidence to trust and invest in our own infrastructure. Let us grow our partnership and make Africa50 a success.” ” A financing gap of US$ $68 – 108 billion” According to statistics provided by the African Development Bank (www.AfDB.org) the continent’s infrastructure funding requirements stand at close to US$ 170 billion a year, leaving a financing gap of US$ $68 – 108 billion. African Development Bank President and Chairman of Africa50, Akinwumi Adesina, said, “We need to act with speed and urgency. Our people expect nothing else.” He emphasized the importance of tackling factors that inhibit private sector infrastructure investments, including high costs of financing, weak regulations,  lack of cost reflective tariffs, low profitability, and weak regulatory frameworks for public-private partnerships. Private sector infrastructure financing in Africa remains low, averaging US$ 6 billion per year. In 2016, the figure dipped to US$ 2.6 billion. Adesina said Africa requires new models of financing infrastructure. “We must work smart to attract greater levels of investment financing for infrastructure development in Africa. Globally, there is approximately a US$ 120 trillion pool of savings and private equity. Africa must creatively attract some of this into the continent,” he said. Africa50 In response to Africa’s infrastructure finance deficit, the African Development Bank has launched the Africa Investment Forum (AIF) set to take place in South Africa in November 2018. The transaction-based forum is expected to be a gathering of global pension funds, sovereign wealth funds and institutional investors, and key private sector players. Adesina commended President Kenyatta for the country’s bold commitment to and investments in infrastructure development over the last 5 years. Infrastructure accounts for 77% of the Bank’s Kenya portfolio. “Mr. President, you were one of the first African leaders to support the creation of Africa50, which I am honored to chair,” said Adesina. “The African Development Bank, of which I am President, helped create Africa50 because we believe new institutional models are needed to close Africa’s...

Read More
Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa
Avr14

Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa

Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa   Some 800 delegates from 59 countries, including ministers and other high-level government and international officials, together with non-state delegates, offered their insights into the challenges and possible responses to climate change, and harvested those insights for consideration in the official international climate negotiation process. Explanation. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache with UNFCCC   The collecting of views – under the banner of the year-long Talanoa Dialogue launched at negotiations in Bonn, Germany, in November 2017 – was a key part of Africa Climate Week that just concluded in Nairobi (Kenya). During this Africa Climate Week, co-organized with the African Development Bank and member of the Nairobi Framework Partnership ( NFP), from 9th to 13th April in Nairobi ( Kenya), some 800 delegates from 59 countries, including ministers and other high level expressed their responses to the threat of climate change, and harvested other insights for consideration in the official international climate negotiations process.  Action on climate change and sustainable development together are the keys for the development of Africa. The Nairobi Framework Partnership (NFP) is celebrating this year its 10th anniversary, as is the Africa Carbon Forum, which was launched by NFP to spur investment in climate action through carbon markets, mechanisms and finance. The NFP members include: the African Development Bank, Asian Development Bank, International Emissions Trading Association, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), UNEP DTU Partnership, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, United Nations Development Programme, UN Climate Change, and World Bank Group. Cooperating organizations include: Africa Low Emission Development Partnership, Climate Markets and Investment Association, Development Bank of Latin America, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, Inter-American Development Bank, Latin American Energy Organization and West African Development Bank. What was their messages exactly? At the first regional Talanoa event since the launch in Bonn, delegates distilled their deliberations into key messages: Finance – Public finance must be instrumental in unlocking private finance Markets – Carbon markets are about doing more together, and doing more with less Energy – Energy is a high priority, affecting everything. Financial instruments should be put in place to de-risk investment and enhance involvement in smaller and medium-sized enterprises Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – Achieving the SDGs, including the climate one is the only way forward Technology – Businesses are ready to pick up new technology solutions, provided there is a good business case. The voice of the private sector is needed now more than ever. “We are engaged across most of the Sustainable Development Goals and clearly focusing on how to create synergy between the different goals and especially with the climate goal, which is...

Read More
COP 22 – Non State Actors:  African Voices for Action
Nov10

COP 22 – Non State Actors: African Voices for Action

COP 22 – Non State Actors:  African Voices for Action  By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache     COP 22  will end on  the 18th of November.  Eraenvironnement.com introduces you to 11 African eminent experts. From Climate finance, environmental law,  to climate justice, these experts are following deeply the negotiations. Their task: finding a new way of thinking and acting  with the need to implement  the Paris Agreement.   Thelma Munequete Born in Mozambique, Thelma Munhequete is a serial entrepreneur, underpinned by training in Germany and South Africa .  Based in Maputo, she setups and runs Africa Foundation For Sustainable Development office ( AFSD)* . This dynamic woman is  experienced  in project Coordination’s , Human resource (Training and Recruitment ) ,project execution. She has been appointed as the Global Environmental Facility’s Country Contact Point for the Civil Society Network, with a key objective of expanding the CSO network in Mozambique.  She currently develops  a Sustainable Community Lodge with main in focus for gender and Youths project and job creation. She has previously conducted  Community Needs Assessment and Environmental Impact Assessment for a Power Station in Mozambique with AFSD support.  She will participate in the first ever Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA) Innovation Forum from 12-13 November 2016, at the Université Cadi Ayyad in parallel to the 22nd Conference of Parties (COP22) of the UNFCCC in Marrakech, Morocco. At the closing session, she will moderate a panel  entitled, “People, Gender and Policy on a Changing Planet”.   *AFSD is guided by international conventions, the Sustainable Development Goals and Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. One of the main challenges of social development is the Appolinaire Zagabe   Working on Climate Change issues since 2011, Appolinaire Zagabe is one of the emerging  talents of his country and Africa. He is from the Democratic Public of Congo. He owns his Master’s degree of Laws in Public International Law from Kampala International University in Uganda. He has taken various  Environment and Climate change courses  in Africa and Europe ( Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Italy).  He  gained significant experience at United Nations Model Conferences, as well as conflict resolution skills, human rights advocacy training, and alternative dispute resolution education and Diplomacy. He initiated multiple projects related to safe environment and food security in DRC. He has followed many UN Climate Change conference as an expert on environmental law. In Marrakech, he follows deeply the issues on climate finance especially on adaptation.   Nkiruka  Nnaemego is  a lawyer,  an agro-entrepreneur and  a development practitioner from Nigeria. This young woman is the  founder of  the  Nigerian youth  Non Governmental Organization:  Fresh and Young Brains Development Initiative ( FYBDI). She  is the executive coordinator...

Read More
Comoros Country Strategy Paper approved by the AfDB
Avr17

Comoros Country Strategy Paper approved by the AfDB

Comoros Country Strategy Paper approved by the AfDB By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache The African Development Bank has recently approved the Comoros’s country Strategy Paper 2016-2020. According to the Board of Directors of the bank, it will enable the country to achieve diversified job-creating economic growth. The Comoros Country Strategy Paper aims indeed to develop basic energy infrastructure and economic diversification. This strategy will rely on the private sector to drive investment in energy and road infrastructure. Comoros will beneficiate from a US $66.35 (UA 40 million) lending programme for the first three years with resources from the 13th and 14th replenishment of the African Development Fund (ADF). Technical assistance programme, reinforcement of the local job content in project design, and the promotion of South-South cooperation will be provided by the bank. The Comoros Country Strategy Paper is linked to the Sustainable Development Goals, the AfDB High5 strategic priorities from 2013 to 2022 and other AfDB strategies. The Bank will also help Comoros in mobilizing other additional resources to support and accelerate the development of the islands. With 781,000 people in 2015, the Union of the Comoros has to fight endemic poverty and persistent food insecurity and malnutrition. In the sustainable Human Development Index (HDI), Comoros was ranked 159th out of 187 countries in 2014. Unemployment in these three islands is very high and it is affecting the youth, especially, women, who represents 50% of young graduates, according to the Comoros Country Strategy Paper. The document focus on the three main islands, Grande Comore, Anjouan and Moheli, about 1,862 kilometre area. This document supports and reinforces the Country’s Accelerated Growth and Sustainable Development Strategy (SCA2D, 2015-2019), which focuses on “inclusive ” through the development of growth-supporting infrastructure, building governance, and institutional and human...

Read More
Election présidentielle aux Comores : Enjeux de développement durable
Avr11

Election présidentielle aux Comores : Enjeux de développement durable

Election présidentielle aux Comores : Enjeux de développement durable Les Comoriens ont voté dimanche dernier dans le cadre du second tour de l’élection présidentielle. Mais quels sont les enjeux de développement durable de ce Petit Etat Insulaire en Développement ? Décryptage. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Potentiel economique D’après le récent rapport de la Commission Economique pour l’Afrique, intitulé « Vers une industrialisation verte en Afrique », les chefs d’Etat africains doivent s’interroger sur les moyens d’intégration de  la jeunesse dans les emplois verts. C’est  l’un des défis les plus importants des gouvernements africains.  Aux Comores, situées dans l’océan indien, les jeunes forment plus de la moitié de la population. Nombreux sont diplômés. Mais, les formations ne sont pas adaptées aux futurs emplois verts. Les formations professionnelles dans l’économie verte pourraient être la solution, selon des experts. Actuellement, il y a une meilleure sensibilisation des questions environnementales dans l’archipel.   « Ces dernières années, il y a eu une conscientisation de la population comorienne. Partout, même dans les milieux reculés, il y a des associations villageoises de sensibilisation, » explique Ismael Bachirou, directeur de l’environnement et des Forêts des Comores. Et d’ajouter : «  La population comorienne a compris. Elle doit  protéger l’environnement pour sa survie. ». Pour M. Bachirou, la disparition des plages, la diminution des rivières, ainsi que les décalages fréquents des saisons pluviales ont incité une partie de la population à mieux comprendre les enjeux environnementaux.   Les Comores, îles d’origine volcanique, regorgent de ressources naturelles non négligeables, selon des experts. Comme les six Petits Etats Insulaires en Développement (PEID) d’Afrique, elles dépendent énormément des secteurs côtiers et marins, indique un rapport sur les PEID de la Commission Economique pour l’Afrique (CEA), publié en 2014. Mais, ces îles vivent aussi des cultures vivrières. Ce secteur procure 40% du PIB.   Depuis quelques années deux concepts définissent les opportunités de développement durable  : l’Economie Bleue et l’Economie Verte. Deux concepts présentés lors du Sommet de la Terre Rio+ 20 en 2012. Ils ont pour vocation d’améliorer le bien être humain et la justice sociale, tout en atténuant les pénuries écologiques, selon le Programme des Nations Unies pour le Développement. De fait, l’Economie Bleue, selon les experts onusiens, s’intéresse à la pêche, la navigation, le transport maritime, le tourisme littoral, l’énergie de la mer ( fossile et renouvelable), les industries pharmaceutiques et cosmétiques, les ressources génétiques et les produits de la mer. L’Economie Verte est caractérisée par  le développement des énergies renouvelables, le marché du carbone, issue des forêts, ainsi que le développement d’une agriculture moderne. Actuellement, avec une population de 752 288 habitants et un PIB par tête de 1100 dollars ( CEA), les Comores peuvent accéder...

Read More

En continuant à utiliser le site, vous acceptez l’utilisation des cookies. Plus d’informations

Les paramètres des cookies sur ce site sont définis sur « accepter les cookies » pour vous offrir la meilleure expérience de navigation possible. Si vous continuez à utiliser ce site sans changer vos paramètres de cookies ou si vous cliquez sur "Accepter" ci-dessous, vous consentez à cela.

Fermer