One Planet Summit : South Africa willing to lead the climate finance mobilization with youth
Déc16

One Planet Summit : South Africa willing to lead the climate finance mobilization with youth

One Planet Summit : South Africa willing to lead the climate finance mobilization with youth   On the Sideline of the One Planet Summit which aimed to mobilize all kind of actors who want to follow the Paris Agreement, beside the willing of the United States of America to withdraw from the Paris Accord, , Phakamile Mainganya, chief Risk Officer of the Industrial Development Corporation, gave his view on the integration of the youth in the private sector related to the adaptation to climate change.   Established in 1940 and owned by the government of South Africa, Industrial Development Corporation is a national development finance institution aims to promote economic growth and industrial development. It aims to be the primary source of commercially sustainable industrial development and innovation to benefit both South Africa and the rest of Africa. IDC promote also entrepreneurship.   Who is Phakamile Mainganya? Phakhamile Mainganya is the Chief Risk officer at the Industrial Development Corporation. His responsabilities include helping to define set and manage the risk universe and profile of the corporation. He has extensive experience in the area of credit risk, risk assurance, and executive leadership particularly in the financial services environment.   Houmi Ahamed-Mikidach interviewed him....

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COP 23: “no time to waste”
Nov07

COP 23: “no time to waste”

 The 2017 UN Climate Change Conference opened on Monday, with the aim of launching nations towards the next level of ambition needed to tackle global warming and put the world on a safer and more prosperous development path, recalled the UNFCCC Secretariat at the opening ceremony. Explanations. By Houmi AHAMED-MIKIDACHE in Bonn   Two years after the adoption of the Paris Climate Change Agreement, this conference held in Bonn and presided by Fiji, the first small island developing state to have this role. “The human suffering caused by intensifying hurricanes, wildfires, droughts, floods and threats to food security caused by climate change means there is no time to waste,” said Mr Frank Bainimarama, the Prime Minister of Fiji and president of COP 23. Critical According to the World Meteorological Organization, 2017 will be one of the three hottest years on records with many high-impact events including catastrophic hurricanes and floods, debilating heatwaves and drought. “The past three years have all been in the top three years in terms of temperature records. This is part of a long term warming trend,” said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas. And he added:  “We have witnessed extraordinary weather, including temperatures topping 50 degrees Celsius in Asia, record-breaking hurricanes in rapid succession in the Caribbean and Atlantic reaching as far as Ireland, devastating monsoon flooding affecting many millions of people and a relentless drought in East Africa. One of the consequences of climate change is food insecurity in developing countries especially. A review of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) found that, in developing countries, agriculture (crops, livestock, fisheries, aquaculture and forestry) accounted for 26% of all the damage and loss associated with medium to large-scale storms, floods and drought. For Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change, it is urgent to act. “The thermometer of risk is rising; the pulse of the planet is racing; people are hurting; the window of opportunity is closing and we must go Further and Faster Together to lift ambition and action to the next defining level, “she said. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the global health impacts of heatwaves depend not only on the overall warming trend, but on how heatwaves are distributed across where people live. Recent research shows that the overall risk of heat-related illness or death has climbed steadily since 1980, with around 30% of the world’s population now living in climatic conditions that deliver prolonged extreme heatwaves. Between 2000 and 2016, the number of vulnerable people exposed to heatwave events has increased by approximately 125 million. The negotiations According to UNFCCC secretariat, COP23 negotiators are keen to move forward on other...

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Climate Week: UN General Assembly
Sep19
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Power Africa:  the US key strategy
Août25

Power Africa: the US key strategy

Power Africa: the US key strategy On August 4, the United States of America  submitted a communication to the United Nations regarding its participation in the next United Nations climate change negotiations in Bonn. A shift and a global reflection for its key strategy: Power Africa. Analysis. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache August 25 2017 On August 4, the United States submitted a communication to the United Nations regarding its participation in the next United Nations climate change negotiations in Bonn and other events related to climate change. The US will indeed be part of the 23rd Conference of the Parties (COP-23) of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. In recent a press release, the State department indicated that this participation aims “to protect U.S. interests and ensure all future policy options remain open to the administration.” And it added: “such participation will include ongoing negotiations related to guidance for implementing the Paris Agreement”. On June 1, however, the US president, Donald Trump announced his intent to withdraw from the Paris Agreement. But while he was in Paris during Bastille Day in july as a host of the French President Emmanuel Macron, he said during a press conference that “something can happen”. It means that there is a shift in the US position toward the Paris Accord. In the  press released , it mentionned that the US president “is open to re-engaging in the Paris Agreement if the United States can identify terms that are more favorable to it, its businesses, its workers, its people, and its taxpayers.” The US said its willing to find “a balanced approach to climate policy” and will promote economic growth and ensure energy security with various approaches. “ We will continue to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions through innovation and technology breakthroughs, and work with other countries to help them access and use fossil fuels more cleanly and efficiently and deploy renewable and other clean energy sources,” related the press release. Achieving Power Africa Recently, the United States of America government led initiative, Power Africa, has released its annual report. Power Africa is the US initiative aims to electrify Africa with more than 150 public and private sector partners, dedicated to invest 54 billion US dollars to achieve Power Africa’s goals. Power Africa wants to increase installed generation capacity by 30,000 megawatts (MW) and adding 60 million new electricity connections by 2030. The 2017 report highlights how Power Africa has facilitated more than 10 million electrical connections for more than 50 million people in Africa through initiative such as Power Africa’s Women in African Power (WiAP) network. This report shows financing agreements which have generated more than 500 million US...

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Accord de Paris : Les Etats-Unis pourraient revenir sur leur décision
Juil16

Accord de Paris : Les Etats-Unis pourraient revenir sur leur décision

Accord de Paris : Les Etats-Unis pourraient revenir sur leur décision En visite à Paris pendant plus de trente heures, le président des Etats-Unis d’Amérique a récemment sous entendu qu’il pourrait revenir sur sa décision de retrait de l’Accord de Paris. Explications. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   Un éventuel  fléchissement Le président des Etats-Unis d’Amérique, Donald Trump pourrait revenir sur sa décision de se retirer de l’Accord de Paris.  «  Quelque chose peut se passer », a-t-il déclaré lors d’une conférence de presse organisée à l’Elysée, la veille du défilé du 14 juillet. Le président américain et son épouse étaient invités en France pour assister à la fête nationale française, qui marquait aussi le centenaire de l’entrée officielle des Etats-Unis dans la première guerre mondiale. Cette visite de plus de 30 heures  aurait été bénéfique dans le cadre de la lutte contre les changements climatiques. Pour le président français,  Donald Trump serait réceptif à la volonté d’une partie des américains  de rester dans l’Accord de Paris. L’approche  française sur l’établissement d’un lien entre réchauffement climatique et terrorisme serait aussi une des raisons de l’éventuel fléchissement du président Trump. «  Il m’a dit qu’il allait essayer de trouver une solution dans les prochains mois : on a parlé dans le détail de ce qui pourrait lui permettre de revenir dans l’Accord de Paris  » a affirmé le président Macron dans une interview exclusive au Journal du Dimanche. Et de poursuivre : «  je pense qu’il a vu aussi [Chez lui] la mobilisation des villes, des Etats, du Monde des affaires et de son propre entourage. Le financement Mais, concrètement,  les Etats-Unis continuent  à financer des programmes de développement en lien direct avec le climat. Même si l’administration américaine a décidé de ne plus abonder le fonds vert pour le climat destiné aux pays en voie de développement. Le 22 juin dernier, le gouvernement américain a effectué un don de 375 millions de dollars dans le secteur de l’énergie au Bénin, dans le cadre du Millenium Challenge Corporation (MCC), une agence américaine  innovante et indépendante créée par le Congrès en 2004 pour lutter contre la pauvreté dans le monde.« Nous restons le plus important donateur d’aide humanitaire en Afrique, incluant le Soudan du Sud, la Corne de l’Afrique, et le lac Tchad, » a récemment affirmé, lors d’un point de presse téléphonique Robert Jenkis, administrateur adjoint du bureau en charge de la démocratie, des conflits et de l’aide humanitaire de l’’Agence Américaine Pour le Développement International (USAID). Les États-Unis ont récemment annoncé une contribution d’un montant de presque 639 millions de dollars en aide humanitaire aux millions de personnes affectées par la précarité alimentaire et la violence au...

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COP 23-Column: Addressing Youth Radicalization and Extremism beyond Hunger and Unemployment
Juil04

COP 23-Column: Addressing Youth Radicalization and Extremism beyond Hunger and Unemployment

COP 23-Column: Addressing Youth Radicalization and Extremism beyond Hunger and Unemployment By Tabi Joda* The mantra One of the most turbulent distractions to mainstream global issues is perhaps, youth radicalization and extremism. The deleterious effects of climate change and natural disasters have increased unsustainable socioeconomic practices. Unfortunately, global and local actors seem to misunderstand the potential and actual motivations surrounding this emerging phenomenon. The mantra of hunger and unemployment is dominating local and international debates on the question. But there is apparently more to the question of radicalization and extremism, in relation to hunger and youths unemployment, than it reaches mainstream understanding.   There is global awe about a suddenly obvious proliferation of youth subscription into insurgent activities often propelled by extremist ideologies. That is a known fact. Vis-à-vis present demographic transitions, there is an ever rising trend of misguided population movements from rural peripheries into urban metropolis leading to alarmingly loud concentration of desperate youths in city centres especially in Africa. To that effect, it is ever more imperative to identify the vulnerabilities upon which youth radicalization and extremism lies. The complications get even worse when we try to answer the question why youths are increasingly being agents of destruction instead of being productive members of their communities.   Different narratives These trends have provoked several narratives from different development angels. But whether these narratives exist in cluster or not, the question at stake is as we feel the impacts of Boko haram insurgents in North East Nigeria and Far North of Cameroon, Alshabaab insurgents in almost all of Somalia including Kenya and beyond, and the Tuareg insurgent groups in Mali who are just about to completely retreat into the deserts, are these narratives based on old thinking or do they offer new thinking, new forms of measurement and research into the root causes of why youths are increasingly being radicalized and mobilized into extreme groups.   Much has been argued about tackling the unemployment crises that is keeping many youth idle and leaving them vulnerable as destructive agents rather than constructive ones. Other arguments have emerged about the question of alleviating youth poverty as a critical step to mitigating exposure of youths to radicalization through extremist groups. These assumptions are good, but it remains to be seen if the discussion will in fact lead to more research and a greater focus on evidence-based approaches tackling the root causes of the issues. “Development efforts have often been driven by assumptions and not evidence,” said Keith Proctor, a senior policy researcher at Mercy Corps. In a summit held a few years ago at the White House about countering violent extremism, the...

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