COP 23: “climate deniers will be defeated”- Tajiel Urioh
Sep23

COP 23: “climate deniers will be defeated”- Tajiel Urioh

COP 23 : “climate deniers will be defeated”- Tajiel Urioh Green Icon- Tajiel Urioh is a young activist from Tanzania. He is the founder of Green Icon, an non profit organization aims to fight climate change. Interview. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   Eraenvironnement.com: Could you please introduce yourself?   I’m Tajiel Urioh, 28 years old from Arusha in Tanzania. I am currently based in Dar es Salaam. Since my childhood I always wanted to protect the  environment particularly plants. In secondary school, I thought about being a botanist. I finally studied later geography and Environment: my passion. I have now a BA Hons on Geography and Environmental Studies from University of Dar es Salaam . I’m a Founder and Executive Director of The Green Icon,  a non-profit organization I found in 2012 when I was second year student. Tajiel Urioh: What is The Green Icon about? The Green Icon is a non-profit organization working on environmental conservation, climate action, energy and green youth development. Action for Resilience is a flagship motto for our organization. We have been working with media houses and youth programmes. And we re thinking to  work with grassroot community now particularly on climate change adaptation, renewable energy and access to safe and clean water.   Two years after the adoption of the Paris Agreement, how do you proceed to help the communities understand the land issues? I see the consensus on adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals, Paris Agreement and Sendai Framework of Disaster Risk Reduction as one of the big victory the world experienced in recent years. On Paris agreement, first I’m very proud that I was one of CSOs soldiers who pushed governments tireless on this agreement, I remember the push on inclusion of Loss and Damage as per Warsaw International Mechanisms for Loss and Damage. I remember that night when all nations agreed and it was really a break heaven step. I’m now working with community on different youth groups and community on conservation and reforestation. With  my organization,  we are also working on raising awareness  for land conservation and well management as per call of Paris Agreement and SDG Goal 15 (Life on Land). How does your organization work with Women? The Green Icon recognizes the role of women. Women are drivers of change in community particularly when there are empowered. It  is for this  reason that we are working closely with girls and women. Women are good agent of changes especially in adaptation measures in agriculture sector where most of them are directly involved in Tanzania. Currently girls who are working with us are becoming voice of  the voice less in...

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COP 23- Action climatique: “Nous sommes au début d’une nouvelle ère” – Hakima El Haité
Sep11

COP 23- Action climatique: “Nous sommes au début d’une nouvelle ère” – Hakima El Haité

COP 23- Action climatique: “Nous sommes au début d’une nouvelle ère” – Hakima El Haité Ancienne Ministre de l’Environnement du Maroc, Hakima El Haité est actuellement l’envoyée spéciale du Royaume chérifien pour la COP 22. Nommée il y a un an championne de haut niveau pour le climat, elle décrit ses différentes actions, notamment celles sur le sommet des territoires  à Agadir  (Maroc) qui s’ouvre aujourd’hui. Entretien.    Propos recueillis par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Vous êtes l’une des actrices principales du sommet des territoires Climate Chance à Agadir. Qu’attendez-vous de cet événement ? Mobiliser, mobiliser et mobiliser. Ce rendez-vous est comme lors de ses éditions précédentes, destiné à rassembler, à partager ensemble les expériences, les bonnes pratiques, les espoirs et puiser l’énergie pour aller plus vite et plus loin. A Marrakech, les acteurs non étatiques ont d’une certaine manière créé l’événement. Rappelez-vous, la Cop 22 s’était ouverte sur l’annonce de l’élection de Donald Trump et les craintes qu’elle suscitait.  Depuis, ces craintes se sont concrétisées par l’annonce au printemps de la volonté de retrait des Etats-Unis de l’Accord de Paris. Contrairement à ce que nous aurions pu craindre, les acteurs non étatiques ont été plutôt galvanisés par cette difficulté politique. C’est grâce à eux que l’on peut parler désormais des nouvelles Conférences des Nations Unies sur le climat “duales” crées par l’Accord de Paris : celle de la négociation entre Etats, et celle de tous les autres acteurs qui agissent sur le terrain. Mais attention, leur efficacité est extrêmement tributaire de la capacité des Etats à mettre en place des politiques de long terme cohérentes avec la transition énergétique. A Agadir, nous sommes là pour construire des points entre le Sud et le Nord, encourager les acteurs non étatiques africains à rejoindre les coalitions mondiales. Nous avons par ailleurs suscité à Agadir un sommet des coalitions, les 13 et le 14 septembre pour nous assurer de la cohérence de ce que nous présenterons lors des journées thématiques de la COP 23, qu’il s’agisse des forêts, d’industrie, de l’océan et du yearbook. Ce sera une étape de travail essentielle pour réussir cette nouvelle COP. Avec un accent particulier sur la diffusion au-delà de l’enceinte onusienne de notre travail. Le grand public doit connaître notre action. Les décideurs économiques aussi. Les médias également. Cette connexion est une des clés de l’accélération de l’action climatique. C’est pour cela qu’à Bonn, nous allons insister sur deux points : le yearbook comme nouvel outil de travail pour les Parties et boussole des acteurs non étatiques et la diffusion du travail des coalitions sur tous les canaux, médias et réseaux sociaux compris. Vous avez récemment à Paris examiné le processus...

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Linking extreme weather to climate change- Scientists
Sep09

Linking extreme weather to climate change- Scientists

As we are watching with concern the unfolding extreme weather events around the globe today and in recent weeks, the relationship of these extremes to the underlying trend of climate change is being discussed by scientists. The Science Media Centre in London, UK has been collating some of these expert views. These comments are also available on the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Newsroom website.   Dr Adrian Champion, of the University of Exeter, said: “The occurrence of two category five hurricanes in the same season hasn’t been known to happen since records began. “It’s difficult to predict whether Irma will continue to strengthen – they get their energy from warm oceans and, given it’s already made landfall, you could expect it to weaken – but now it’s passing over the ocean again it could re-intensify. “The question regarding whether Jose will develop into a category five hurricane is mixed. Given that Irma has just passed through, there isn’t as much ‘energy’ to intensify Jose. However, the conditions are similar. “The climate change projections are that we’ll get fewer, but more intense, cyclones in the future.” Dr Ilan Kelman, Reader in Risk Resilience and Global Health at University College London, said: “As the scale of devastation from Hurricane Irma emerges, once post-disaster needs are met, we can ask about readiness. The islands which were hit knew they were in a hurricane zone and many run drills every year to be prepared for the hurricane season. In places, it appears to have saved lives. But we always want to strive to help everyone–and to be ready beforehand to reconstruct as soon as the storm has passed.” Dr Chris Holloway, tropical storm expert at the University of Reading, said: “Hurricane Irma is a potentially life-threatening storm for the Caribbean islands and neighbouring Leeward Islands due to winds up to 185 mph and storm surge up to 11 feet with large swells on top of this. The storm is likely to maintain very strong intensity (category 4 or 5) over the next three days, probably staying just north of the Greater Antilles but still a potential threat to Puerto Rico and Hispaniola. After that, the forecast track becomes more uncertain, with the storm likely affecting the Bahamas and Florida over the weekend. “Since the storm will begin to turn more towards the north in about five days, but the exact timing of this turn is uncertain, all of the Florida peninsula, the Bahamas, Cuba, and the Carolinas and Georgia should be prepared for a possible landfall or other effects of a severe hurricane.  The main dangers with this storm are storm surge and...

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Small Grants to empower rural communities
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Small Grants to empower rural communities

Small Grants to empower rural communities By DeodatusMfugale Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. August, 30 2017 Recently the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) disclosed  5.2  billion shillings to 60 rural communities in Tanzania ( mainland  and Zanzibar), through the  the Global Environmental Facility Grants Programme(GEF). With these small grants, millions of rural Tanzanians will implement projects ranging from provision of sustainable energy to water supply and sanitation. Projects on climate change adaptation such as fish farming, beekeeping and horticulture will be implemented. These community-based activities in agriculture, fisheries, livestock management, agroforestry and solar energy are meant to address the direct needs of the rural poor. Additionally, other areas will be covered include conservation of water sources, ecotourism, promotion of land use planning and small and artisanal mining. Women empowerment These small grants will not only be able to positively impact the lives of millions of Tanzanians but these financial supports will  also gain valuable skills and experience to the communities on sustainable basis, according to the UNDP. In Western Kilimanjaro, for instance, part of the Lake Natron Ecosystem will focus on building the resilience of local communities to climate change impacts through their participation in development projects. Climate Action Network Tanzania is the lead partner in implementing this project that will promote appropriate ecosystem management through landscape planning. It will also promote gender mainstreaming in climate smart agriculture and other activities.This project aims also to provide space for women, men and youth. It will help them to participate fully in all activities. “It is important to fund activities among rural communities because they are part of the critical dimensions of development,” said the UNDP Officer In Charge, David Omozuafoh. To his view, this project will also protect indigenous knowledge on environment and natural resources and will establish community based ecosystem management committees, through education ( training, learning best practices. “Development activities at community level provide policy feedback on poverty eradication strategies whereas community-based experiences and ideas constitute building blocks for people-centred policies and strategies,” explained the UNDP officer.                      ...

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Dr Richard Munang: “With EBAFOSA, everyone can be engaged in Africa”
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Dr Richard Munang: “With EBAFOSA, everyone can be engaged in Africa”

Dr Richard Munang: “With EBAFOSA,everyone can be engaged in Africa” Currently the Africa Regional Climate Change Programme Coordinator of the UN Environment, Dr Richard Munang helps drive countries to implement the Paris Agreement and helping young people finding opportunities in green jobs. Presentation. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Dr Richard Munang is the Africa Regional Climate Change Programme Coordinator of the UN Environment for 8 years. He holds a PhD in Environmental Change and Policy from the University of Nottingham, in the United Kingdom. He also holds an Executive Certificate in Climate Change and Energy Policy Making from Harvard Kennedy School of Government, in the United States of America. In 2016, he received the prestigious African Environmental Hero award conferred by the International Environmental Roundtable for Africa for his leadership on environmental policies across the continent. His assignments “My main role is to help drive UNEP strategies on climate change in Africa, mostly in helping countries to implement the Paris Agreement, from the perspective of seeing climate action as social economic opportunity to address aspect on food security, create jobs and other opportunities as well as offsetting carbon and contributing to the resilience of ecosystem,”Dr Munang said recently. He is indeed coordinating the implementation of diverse projects in key economic sectors especially in agriculture, and in energy. From 2009 to 2012, he worked on coordinating a program called “climate change adaptation and development in Africa”. This project involved 11 countries.  Ghana, Togo, Senegal, Benin, Seychelles, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Rwanda were part of this project. “We have learned that there is no absence of action across the continent, but what has been the problem is that these actions are often isolated and not be brought together,” he explained. Dr. Munang launched  the first Africa Adaptation Gap Report which has helped to galvanize a coherent continental strategic climate policy position. Change the attitudes with EBAFOSA He is currently working on showing examples of adaptation projects in Africa, through the framework Ecosystem Based Adaptation for Food Security in Africa Assembly: EBAFOSA. In 2015, indeed, the UN environment in collaboration with the African Union Commission and other partners created EBAFOSA. Today,  Dr Munang  mentors African youth: he gives them knowledge to solve Africa’s environmental and development challenges. He is working with 44 countries. “With EBAFOSA,everyone can be engaged in Africa: it is also an opportunity for young people, to develop mobile application in the agriculture value chain for instance,” he explained. For Dr Munang, Combining  Agriculture with Information Communication Technology (ICT) is the key for Africa Sustainable Development. After years of advocacy on adaptation to climate change in Africa, he  thinks that  institutions of higher...

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Tabi Joda-Column: ” It is  time to reverse the trends!”
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Tabi Joda-Column: ” It is time to reverse the trends!”

Tabi Joda-Column: ” It is  time to reverse the trends!” In Nigeria, Ghana and Cameroon alone, 50 metric tons of plastic fragments food packages, straws and table water bottles and empty sachet water bags are drained into the Atlantic Ocean every day. But it is time to reverse the trends.  It is everyone’s responsibility not only governments to protect the planet.     Over the last ten years the amount of plastic bags produced and used worldwide surpass the amount produced and used during the whole of the 20th century. Regrettably, 50% of the plastic we use, we just use them once and throw away. If we can place in a heap the amount of plastic bags we throw away into the environment each year, it will stretch from earth to the moon and back twenty five times. Globally, more than one million plastic bags are used every minute and an average individual throws away approximately 185 kg of plastic waste per year. An average household dumps about 900kg of plastic waste in a year. Similarly, an approximate 500 billion plastic bags are used and 135 billion plastic water bottles are thrown away every year. Plastic waste accounts for around 10 percent of the total waste generated in households worldwide.   The disaster Risk!     Every piece of plastic in the ocean breaks down into segments such that pieces from a single liter of plastic bottle could end up on every beach throughout the world. Similarly, almost every farmland is partially covered by plastic. Apart from the harmful effects of plastic bags on animals, plants and aquatic life, the toxic chemical from plastic waste are harmful to the human body when absorbed. A study has shown that apart from Americans who have up to 93% of people tested positive for BPA (a plastic chemical), level of effect are even higher in other parts of the world especially Africa where recycling and waste management policies and orientations are low or even absent in most places. Other studies have shown that some of these compounds found in plastic have been known to alter human hormones or have other potential risk on human health.   Alongside the hazardous risks on human health, over one million sea birds and over 100,000 marine mammals are reportedly killed annually from toxins originating from plastic waste in our oceans. 44% of seabird species, 22% of cetaceans, 32% of sea turtle species and a growing list of fish species, crabs and prawns are killed by plastics or have their habitat altered by plastic in or around their bodies. Plastics also degrade soil quality leading to low crop productivity and consequently poverty,...

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