African Climate Talks II: Africa needs to act urgently
Avr11

African Climate Talks II: Africa needs to act urgently

African Climate Talks II: Africa needs to act urgently By Olumide Idowu* Participants attending the African Climate Talks II (ACT-II) in Addis Ababa ( Ethiopia) in March,  called Africa to change how it does business to reap the benefits of the Paris Agreement. Attending the two-day talks last month called “Market policy versus market mechanisms in the implementation of the Paris Agreement”, speakers asked for an urgent shift in how the continent will forge ahead to escape the consequences of climate change. Ambassador Lumumba Di-Aping, from South Sudan and former chair of the G77 called for strengthening of the current regime, noting that the current Paris Agreement is fundamentally flawed and inadequate. “The agreement will be the main basis for multilateral cooperation during the first period of commitments (2020-2030). The African Continent in this new architecture is tragically weaker than even before,” Di-Aping said. He urged Africa to reinvent itself consistently through science. “We must think “out of the box” to build the framework for a more effective effort from 2025 onwards – one consistent with Africa’s survival and prosperity,” he said. Dr James Murombedzi, the Officer in Charge of the Africa Climate Centre Policy (ACPC) noted that the continent needs to invest in strong evidence based African narrative. “This narrative should have a science, research and policy interface. We also should invest in informed societies that participate in the shaping of policies and strengthen capacities of countries,” Murombedzi said. “The temperatures are rising and Africa is suffering. Let us unite to save our continent. Let us develop sustainable ways of dealing with climate change,” Woldu said. Di-Aping noted that Africa must move beyond the old dichotomy of “mitigation and adaptation.” “We must look at each sector – agriculture, industry etc – and focus on integrating climate considerations into wider industrial and development planning in an integrated way. The climate regime must focus not just on “emissions reductions” but on the real solutions needed to achieve them,” Di-Aping said. He urged for negotiations which provide a space where these with problems, with solutions and with money, can meet as part of a structured process. “We need to make the UNFCCC more relevant to the real world.  The Africa Renewable Energy Initiative is to be commended as an important step in the energy sector – we need matching initiatives in each other sector,” he said. “Let us think about the financial sector and financial instruments and engineering. If we need a major plan to address 1.50C, the question arises how to fund it. Clearly the $10 billion in the GCF will not be enough; and developed countries have no intention...

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One Planet Summit : South Africa willing to lead the climate finance mobilization with youth
Déc16

One Planet Summit : South Africa willing to lead the climate finance mobilization with youth

One Planet Summit : South Africa willing to lead the climate finance mobilization with youth   On the Sideline of the One Planet Summit which aimed to mobilize all kind of actors who want to follow the Paris Agreement, beside the willing of the United States of America to withdraw from the Paris Accord, , Phakamile Mainganya, chief Risk Officer of the Industrial Development Corporation, gave his view on the integration of the youth in the private sector related to the adaptation to climate change.   Established in 1940 and owned by the government of South Africa, Industrial Development Corporation is a national development finance institution aims to promote economic growth and industrial development. It aims to be the primary source of commercially sustainable industrial development and innovation to benefit both South Africa and the rest of Africa. IDC promote also entrepreneurship.   Who is Phakamile Mainganya? Phakhamile Mainganya is the Chief Risk officer at the Industrial Development Corporation. His responsabilities include helping to define set and manage the risk universe and profile of the corporation. He has extensive experience in the area of credit risk, risk assurance, and executive leadership particularly in the financial services environment.   Houmi Ahamed-Mikidach interviewed him....

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COP 23 : A half victory for developing countries
Nov18

COP 23 : A half victory for developing countries

COP 23 : A half victory for  developing countries   The Un Climate Change negotiations ended at nearly 7 o’clock this morning with a song from the Fijians.  Started two weeks ago, these negotiations make time to find any compromise between developed and developing countries. As usual. The story. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   The implementation of the Paris Agreement have many issues: adaptation and mitigation through the NDCs, loss and damage,   adaptation,  adaptation fund, finance, transfer of technology, transparency, support and capacity building. Most of all these elements have been taken separately through a facilitative dialogue launched during COP 21 in Paris and pursued in Marrakech during COP 22, then in Bonn with the Fiji presidency, and  the Talanoa Dialogue, a conversation between north and south representatives to achieve the long term pathway to 1,5°Celsius.   The Talanoa Dialogue “ We have been doing the job that we were given to do: advance the implementation guidelines of the Paris Agreement, and prepare for more ambitions actions for the Talanoa dialogue in 2018,” said the  Prime minister of Fiji and president of COP 23, Frank Bainimarama. For the Prime Minister of Fiji, there has been a positive momentum in various areas in COP 23 : the global community has embraced the Fiji  concept of grand coalition for greater ambition linking national governments, states and cities, civil society, the private sector and all women around the world.“ We have  launched a global partnership  to provide millions of climate vulnerable people an affordable access to insurance,” said the president of COP 23. For him, this COP has  put people first. It has connected the people who are not experts on climate change to the UN Climate  negotiations. According to him, putting people first showed to the world that these people are facing climate change in their daily lives. What has been achieved? Saturday, 2.40 Am, the African negotiators left again the negotiations rooms and were happy:   “ We got it Adaptation Fund and Article 9.5,” said Ambassador Nafo from Mali and head of the African group of negotiators. The decisions adopted in Bonn explained that there will be modalities for the accounting of financial resources provided and mobilized through public intervention in accordance to the article 9 of the Paris Agreement. The Article 9.5 of the Paris Agreement has mentionned that the Developed country Parties shall biennially communicate indicative quantitative and qualitative information related to finance of both mitigation and adaptation. Back and Forth Last night was marked by Back and Forth from all the delegates. And it continued earlier  this morning.  At 3am, the Republic of Ecuador on behalf of the G77+...

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COP 23: “no time to waste”
Nov07

COP 23: “no time to waste”

 The 2017 UN Climate Change Conference opened on Monday, with the aim of launching nations towards the next level of ambition needed to tackle global warming and put the world on a safer and more prosperous development path, recalled the UNFCCC Secretariat at the opening ceremony. Explanations. By Houmi AHAMED-MIKIDACHE in Bonn   Two years after the adoption of the Paris Climate Change Agreement, this conference held in Bonn and presided by Fiji, the first small island developing state to have this role. “The human suffering caused by intensifying hurricanes, wildfires, droughts, floods and threats to food security caused by climate change means there is no time to waste,” said Mr Frank Bainimarama, the Prime Minister of Fiji and president of COP 23. Critical According to the World Meteorological Organization, 2017 will be one of the three hottest years on records with many high-impact events including catastrophic hurricanes and floods, debilating heatwaves and drought. “The past three years have all been in the top three years in terms of temperature records. This is part of a long term warming trend,” said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas. And he added:  “We have witnessed extraordinary weather, including temperatures topping 50 degrees Celsius in Asia, record-breaking hurricanes in rapid succession in the Caribbean and Atlantic reaching as far as Ireland, devastating monsoon flooding affecting many millions of people and a relentless drought in East Africa. One of the consequences of climate change is food insecurity in developing countries especially. A review of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) found that, in developing countries, agriculture (crops, livestock, fisheries, aquaculture and forestry) accounted for 26% of all the damage and loss associated with medium to large-scale storms, floods and drought. For Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change, it is urgent to act. “The thermometer of risk is rising; the pulse of the planet is racing; people are hurting; the window of opportunity is closing and we must go Further and Faster Together to lift ambition and action to the next defining level, “she said. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the global health impacts of heatwaves depend not only on the overall warming trend, but on how heatwaves are distributed across where people live. Recent research shows that the overall risk of heat-related illness or death has climbed steadily since 1980, with around 30% of the world’s population now living in climatic conditions that deliver prolonged extreme heatwaves. Between 2000 and 2016, the number of vulnerable people exposed to heatwave events has increased by approximately 125 million. The negotiations According to UNFCCC secretariat, COP23 negotiators are keen to move forward on other...

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COP 23: Un aperçu de la finance climatique- ICCG
Oct07

COP 23: Un aperçu de la finance climatique- ICCG

COP 23-Un aperçu de la finance climatique- ICCG   Plusieurs représentants de gouvernements et d’institutions financières ont été interviewés à l’occasion d’une réunion organisée par  le ICCG ,  l’initiative sur les politiques de changement climatique et de gouvernance, un institut basé en Italie.   Explications. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Comment atteindre les objectifs de l’accord de Paris ? Selon Barbara Buchner, la directrice exécutive de l’institut  Climate Policy Initiative, , il doit y avoir un développement massif rapide autant dans l’adaptation que dans la réduction des gaz à effet de serre, afin d’atteindre les objectifs de l’accord de Paris et atteindre les 2 voire 1,5  degrés recommandés par la science.   Si nous ne sommes pas en mesure  de mettre en application sérieusement le premier tour des contributions nationales, nous ne pourrons pas passer au second tour : nous devons ainsi sérieusement travailler ensemble avec le secteur privé, les gouvernements, c’est une importante mission de coordination, explique le Norbert Goriben, le responsable de Climate Finance International. Mais, mettre en application les contributions nationales n’est pas si évident, notamment en Afrique.  “Nous n’avons pas assez de données pour répondre aux exigences en matière d’établissement de rapports liés à l’accord de Paris et nous avons besoin de renforcement de capacités pour développer la collecte de données, les technologies, les ressources humaines et nous avons besoin de financement pour mettre en œuvre ces projets liés aux contributions nationales, indiquent Pacifica F. Achieng Ogola, Directrice du département Changement Climatique du Ministère de l’Environnement, des Ressources Naturelles et du Développement Régional du Kenya. Et de préciser :  ” Les modalités de mise en œuvre de certains éléments des contributions nationales ne sont pas très explicites, nous attendons les conclusions des Conférences des Nations Unies sur le Climat , COP 23,et COP 24. Selon les experts interviewés, le partenariat sur les contributions nationales lancé par le Maroc et l’Allemagne, l’an dernier, ont impulsé le développement et la planification de la finance climatique, mais les avancées sont timides. Le secteur privé peut avoir un rôle important dans l’accélération de l’accès à la finance climatique.  ...

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COP 23: “climate deniers will be defeated”- Tajiel Urioh
Sep23

COP 23: “climate deniers will be defeated”- Tajiel Urioh

COP 23 : “climate deniers will be defeated”- Tajiel Urioh Green Icon- Tajiel Urioh is a young activist from Tanzania. He is the founder of Green Icon, an non profit organization aims to fight climate change. Interview. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   Eraenvironnement.com: Could you please introduce yourself?   I’m Tajiel Urioh, 28 years old from Arusha in Tanzania. I am currently based in Dar es Salaam. Since my childhood I always wanted to protect the  environment particularly plants. In secondary school, I thought about being a botanist. I finally studied later geography and Environment: my passion. I have now a BA Hons on Geography and Environmental Studies from University of Dar es Salaam . I’m a Founder and Executive Director of The Green Icon,  a non-profit organization I found in 2012 when I was second year student. Tajiel Urioh: What is The Green Icon about? The Green Icon is a non-profit organization working on environmental conservation, climate action, energy and green youth development. Action for Resilience is a flagship motto for our organization. We have been working with media houses and youth programmes. And we re thinking to  work with grassroot community now particularly on climate change adaptation, renewable energy and access to safe and clean water.   Two years after the adoption of the Paris Agreement, how do you proceed to help the communities understand the land issues? I see the consensus on adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals, Paris Agreement and Sendai Framework of Disaster Risk Reduction as one of the big victory the world experienced in recent years. On Paris agreement, first I’m very proud that I was one of CSOs soldiers who pushed governments tireless on this agreement, I remember the push on inclusion of Loss and Damage as per Warsaw International Mechanisms for Loss and Damage. I remember that night when all nations agreed and it was really a break heaven step. I’m now working with community on different youth groups and community on conservation and reforestation. With  my organization,  we are also working on raising awareness  for land conservation and well management as per call of Paris Agreement and SDG Goal 15 (Life on Land). How does your organization work with Women? The Green Icon recognizes the role of women. Women are drivers of change in community particularly when there are empowered. It  is for this  reason that we are working closely with girls and women. Women are good agent of changes especially in adaptation measures in agriculture sector where most of them are directly involved in Tanzania. Currently girls who are working with us are becoming voice of  the voice less in...

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