COP 23- Tonga hosts Pacific meeting on GCF funds
Juil18

COP 23- Tonga hosts Pacific meeting on GCF funds

COP 23- Tonga hosts Pacific meeting on GCF funds 07-18-2017 The Kingdom of Tonga hosts the Green Climate Fund’s Structured Dialogue with the Pacific during four days. This meeting is  organized in collaboration with the Governments of  Australia. It aims to accelerate the implementation of GCF projects and programmes approuved in the Pacific. The meeting has been  launched by the Deputy Prime Minister of Tonga and Minister of MEIDECC, Honourable Siaosi Sovaleni on July 18 at the Faónelua Convention Centre.  The dialogue will open with a High-Level Segment at Faónelua followed by a three-day Technical workshop at Tanoá International Hotel. GCF  Board Members, Secretariat Staff,  ministers of countries in the Pacific, senior government officials, including representatives of the GCF National Designated Entities and Focal points, private sector representatives and civil society organizations  are attending the meeting. The four- day gathering is an opportunity for countries and Accredites Entities to share their experiences in various programmes fund by the GCF. According to the GCF Communication department, the dialogue is expected to help Pacific Island countries identify Accredited Entities and private sector organisations to partner with. It will help identify Accredited Entities, including private sector partners to support the project proposals to fight climate change. This dialogue is  part of the sustained development of a Regional Roadmap initiated in 2016 GCF Regional Meeting which has to help strengthen Pacific Island countries engagement with the...

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COP 23-Tonga abrite une réunion sur le fonds vert
Juil18

COP 23-Tonga abrite une réunion sur le fonds vert

COP 23- Tonga abrite une réunion sur le fonds vert Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache 18-07-2017 Les îles Tonga accueillent le secrétariat et les administrateurs du fonds vert  pour le climat de l’ONU,  dans le cadre d’un dialogue structuré, organisé conjointement avec l’Australie du 18 au 21 juillet.Sa mission : accélérer la mise en œuvre des projets et des programmes financés par le fonds vert dans le pacifique. Les ministres des pays du Pacifique,  les représentant des autorités nationales désignées du fonds vert, les points focaux, les agences accréditées au fonds, la société civile,  ainsi que le secteur privé sont aussi présents. Selon les administrateurs du fonds, ces quatre jours de réunion sont une opportunité pour tous ces acteurs  de partager les expériences  financées par le fonds dans plusieurs domaines. Cette rencontre s’intègre dans la feuille de route régionale des îles du Pacifique, établie en 2016, lors d’une réunion régionale du Fonds Vert qui a eu lieu aux îles Fidji.  14 pays avaient alors présenté des idées de projets dans trois secteurs: l’énergie, les infrastructures, et le renforcement de la résilience des populations. A l’issue de la  rencontre aux îles Tonga, les différents participants identifieront les agences accréditées, en incluant les partenaires du secteur privé qui mettront en œuvre le développement des projets  ambitieux financés par le fonds dans le cadre de l’action climatique, précise un communiqué venant du Secrétariat du fonds vert sur le climat, basé en Corée du...

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COP 23-Column: Addressing Youth Radicalization and Extremism beyond Hunger and Unemployment
Juil04

COP 23-Column: Addressing Youth Radicalization and Extremism beyond Hunger and Unemployment

COP 23-Column: Addressing Youth Radicalization and Extremism beyond Hunger and Unemployment By Tabi Joda* The mantra One of the most turbulent distractions to mainstream global issues is perhaps, youth radicalization and extremism. The deleterious effects of climate change and natural disasters have increased unsustainable socioeconomic practices. Unfortunately, global and local actors seem to misunderstand the potential and actual motivations surrounding this emerging phenomenon. The mantra of hunger and unemployment is dominating local and international debates on the question. But there is apparently more to the question of radicalization and extremism, in relation to hunger and youths unemployment, than it reaches mainstream understanding.   There is global awe about a suddenly obvious proliferation of youth subscription into insurgent activities often propelled by extremist ideologies. That is a known fact. Vis-à-vis present demographic transitions, there is an ever rising trend of misguided population movements from rural peripheries into urban metropolis leading to alarmingly loud concentration of desperate youths in city centres especially in Africa. To that effect, it is ever more imperative to identify the vulnerabilities upon which youth radicalization and extremism lies. The complications get even worse when we try to answer the question why youths are increasingly being agents of destruction instead of being productive members of their communities.   Different narratives These trends have provoked several narratives from different development angels. But whether these narratives exist in cluster or not, the question at stake is as we feel the impacts of Boko haram insurgents in North East Nigeria and Far North of Cameroon, Alshabaab insurgents in almost all of Somalia including Kenya and beyond, and the Tuareg insurgent groups in Mali who are just about to completely retreat into the deserts, are these narratives based on old thinking or do they offer new thinking, new forms of measurement and research into the root causes of why youths are increasingly being radicalized and mobilized into extreme groups.   Much has been argued about tackling the unemployment crises that is keeping many youth idle and leaving them vulnerable as destructive agents rather than constructive ones. Other arguments have emerged about the question of alleviating youth poverty as a critical step to mitigating exposure of youths to radicalization through extremist groups. These assumptions are good, but it remains to be seen if the discussion will in fact lead to more research and a greater focus on evidence-based approaches tackling the root causes of the issues. “Development efforts have often been driven by assumptions and not evidence,” said Keith Proctor, a senior policy researcher at Mercy Corps. In a summit held a few years ago at the White House about countering violent extremism, the...

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Benin- African Carbon Forum: African countries must work closer together
Juin30

Benin- African Carbon Forum: African countries must work closer together

Benin- African Carbon Forum: African countries must work closer together Cotonou-Benin- 30 June 2017 By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache African countries must work closer together when implementing national climate action plans under the Paris Climate Change Agreement and mobilizing climate finance, whilst better integrating climate action into sustainable development planning, concluded ministers and key delegates who convened for the Africa Carbon Forum which ended today in Cotonou, Benin. Over 600 practitioners, experts and policy makers, including ministers from governments across Africa and other high level participants, met in Cotonou to take stock and align strategies on how financial resources should be mobilized to ensure sustainable development and emissions reduction on a continent-wide scale. “Africa is the continent most affected by climate change: two thirds of Africans make their living off the land, consequently, it is critical that the continent secures a climate-resilient economic and development path, said Abdoulaye Bio Tchane, Senior Minister in charge of Planning and Development of Benin, a western african country which host the Africa Carbon Forum. Foster economic growth With ambitious commitments already made by countries under the Paris Agreement, and with more commitments expected, African ministers and other leaders stressed the importance of building momentum that will enable the transformational shift towards low carbon and greater resilience to climate change. Patnerships are needed to develop and spur sustainable development, participants also highlighted. “Africa is one of the most important engines for growth worldwide in the coming years. African people are at the core of this growth. But the growth needs to be shaped on the basis of related climate and sustainable development criteria,” explained the Executive Secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Patricia Espinosa. And she added: “Africa’s nationally determined contributions to the agreement are blueprints for attracting private sector investment and pushing forward. Implementation of the Paris Agreement is the foundation for stability, for security and prosperity as the population grows to 9 billion people or more by 2050.”With food, water, renewable energy, jobs, African can build sustainable, resilient communities, she emphasized. The non State Actors Delegates at this year’s Africa Carbon Forum confirmed that non-Party stakeholders, including private sector and cities, stand ready to enhance ambition on climate action and welcomed the event as a unique regional event, which facilitates knowledge and new partnerships which are key to allowing Africa to realize its potential and meet the ambitions goals set in the Paris agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Delegates discussed crucial themes ranging from climate policy options to the future of the existing and widely use mechanisms that are suitable to the different domestic context and can be...

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Forum Africain du carbone : pour une Afrique cohérente
Juin30

Forum Africain du carbone : pour une Afrique cohérente

Forum Africain du carbone : pour une Afrique cohérente Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache       Cotonou-  Bénin- 30 juin 2017   Mobilisation L’Afrique doit travailler en coordination pour la mobilisation des financements et la mise en œuvre des plans d’action climat nationaux, sous l’accord de Paris, ont déclaré les ministres et experts réunis au forum africain du carbone, qui s’est terminé aujourd’hui. Plus de  600 professionnels, des ministres, des  experts et  des décideurs politiques de toute l’Afrique ont fait  le bilan des actions du continent  pour aligner les stratégies de mobilisation de ressources financières et assurer un développement durable et une réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre à l’échelle du continent. ” L’Afrique est le continent le plus touché par les Changements Climatiques. Deux tiers des Africains vivent de la terre et il est donc primordial que le continent emprunte une voie économique et développementale résiliente au climat, » a déclaré Abdoulaye Bio Tchané, ministre d’État chargé du plan et du développement du Bénin. Les pays africains se sont engagés à Cotonou à créer un élan autour de la transition énergétique et souhaitent établir de nouveaux partenariats pour renforcer et stimuler le développement durable. Stimuler la croissance ” L’Afrique est l’un des moteurs les plus importants de la croissance mondiale pour les prochaines années, » a affirmé  la Secrétaire exécutive de la Convention-Cadre des Nations Unies sur les Changements Climatiques (CCNUCC), Patricia Espinosa, lors de son allocution adressée aux délégués. Et d’ajouter : «  Les contributions déterminées au niveau national de l’Afrique sont des plans permettant d’attirer les investissements du secteur privé ». Mme Espinosa a rappelé que  la mise en œuvre de l’Accord de Paris permettra au continent africain, qui devrait atteindre 9 milliards de personnes ou plus d’ici 2050,  d’avoir  accès à l’alimentation, l’eau, l’énergie, aux emplois, ainsi qu’à la stabilité, la sécurité et la prospérité. L’implication des acteurs non étatiques Présents au Forum africain du carbone, les acteurs non étatiques, notamment les villes et le secteur privé, ont réaffirmé leur ambition en terme d’action climatique. Le forum de Cotonou leur a permis d’échanger des connaissances et de développer de nouveaux partenariats, «  essentiels pour permettre à l’Afrique d’atteindre les objectifs fixés par l’Accord de Paris ainsi que les objectifs du développement durable   », précise un communiqué de la Convention Cadre des Nations Unies sur les Changements Climatiques. Tout au long des discussions, les participants au forum ont abordé plusieurs thèmes allant des options en matière de politique climatique, à l’avenir des mécanismes existants et largement utilisés, adaptés aux divers contextes nationaux  et qui peuvent être élevés au niveau régional en Afrique. Autre élément important: les participants se sont prononcés pour le renforcement...

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Climate and Development Agendas Are Inherently Linked
Mar26

Climate and Development Agendas Are Inherently Linked

Speaking at the opening of the President of the General Assembly High-Level Event Climate Change and the Sustainable Development Agenda in New York on 23 March, UNFCCC Executive Secretary Patricia Espinosa said that the sustainable development and climate change agendas are inherently linked. “By looking at climate and sustainability holistically, we maximize the potential for positive outcomes of every action we take. And when international commitments are turned into country-level action, tangible benefits are delivered to communities and the people who live there,” she said. Here is her full address: H.E. Mr. Peter Thomson, President of the United Nations General Assembly, H.E. Mr. António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations, Excellencies, Distinguished guests, Ladies and gentlemen, Let me first recognize the President of the General Assembly and the Government of Fiji for your climate leadership. Today’s special event is the latest in a long list that is your lasting legacy of leadership on this critical issue. Thank you for shining a light on vulnerability through your work in the Pacific Islands Forum and Climate Vulnerable Forum. Thank you for your bold Paris Agreement contribution of 100 per cent renewable power by 2030. Thank you for being the first to ratify the Paris Agreement. And thank you for your excellent partnership as COP 23 President in preparation of this year’s UN climate change conference. I must also express my sincere gratitude to the Secretary-General for making the connection between climate change and the sustainable development agenda and calling for an integrated approach to our challenges. Your vision of preventing future risk through stronger institutions, more resilient societies and bold action must guide every nation forward through the sometimes turbulent waters of transformative change. How far is the Paris Agreement ? One hundred and thirty-seven Member States are working towards that vision by ratifying the Paris Climate Change Agreement. This is both a crucial step towards concerted action on climate change and a step towards truly sustainable development. As the international community takes these important initial steps in this new era of implementation, we must do so with the full knowledge that the sustainable development agenda and climate change agenda are inherently linked. These challenges must be addressed in an integrated manner because there is only one on-the-ground reality. By looking at climate and sustainability holistically, we maximize the potential for positive outcomes of every action we take. And when international commitments are turned into country-level action, tangible benefits are delivered to communities and the people who live there. Implementation is the policy that meets these commitments. And we must move quickly to put this policy in place. We must bend...

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