Sustainable Development: Women in Tanzania are fighting for equal rights
Sep23

Sustainable Development: Women in Tanzania are fighting for equal rights

Sustainable Development: Women in Tanzania  are fighting for equal rights By Deodatus Mfugale     In  Asha Kadgo, a Land Tights Monitor in Uhambingeto Village in Kilolo District of Iringa Region in Tanzania’s Southern Highlands. Land Rights Monitors help to resolve land-based conflicts in their communities, provide paralegal guidance and raise awareness on landrights in their communities.          ...

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COP 23: “climate deniers will be defeated”- Tajiel Urioh
Sep23

COP 23: “climate deniers will be defeated”- Tajiel Urioh

COP 23 : “climate deniers will be defeated”- Tajiel Urioh Green Icon- Tajiel Urioh is a young activist from Tanzania. He is the founder of Green Icon, an non profit organization aims to fight climate change. Interview. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   Eraenvironnement.com: Could you please introduce yourself?   I’m Tajiel Urioh, 28 years old from Arusha in Tanzania. I am currently based in Dar es Salaam. Since my childhood I always wanted to protect the  environment particularly plants. In secondary school, I thought about being a botanist. I finally studied later geography and Environment: my passion. I have now a BA Hons on Geography and Environmental Studies from University of Dar es Salaam . I’m a Founder and Executive Director of The Green Icon,  a non-profit organization I found in 2012 when I was second year student. Tajiel Urioh: What is The Green Icon about? The Green Icon is a non-profit organization working on environmental conservation, climate action, energy and green youth development. Action for Resilience is a flagship motto for our organization. We have been working with media houses and youth programmes. And we re thinking to  work with grassroot community now particularly on climate change adaptation, renewable energy and access to safe and clean water.   Two years after the adoption of the Paris Agreement, how do you proceed to help the communities understand the land issues? I see the consensus on adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals, Paris Agreement and Sendai Framework of Disaster Risk Reduction as one of the big victory the world experienced in recent years. On Paris agreement, first I’m very proud that I was one of CSOs soldiers who pushed governments tireless on this agreement, I remember the push on inclusion of Loss and Damage as per Warsaw International Mechanisms for Loss and Damage. I remember that night when all nations agreed and it was really a break heaven step. I’m now working with community on different youth groups and community on conservation and reforestation. With  my organization,  we are also working on raising awareness  for land conservation and well management as per call of Paris Agreement and SDG Goal 15 (Life on Land). How does your organization work with Women? The Green Icon recognizes the role of women. Women are drivers of change in community particularly when there are empowered. It  is for this  reason that we are working closely with girls and women. Women are good agent of changes especially in adaptation measures in agriculture sector where most of them are directly involved in Tanzania. Currently girls who are working with us are becoming voice of  the voice less in...

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Climate Change in Tanzania: Farmers are Waiting for solutions
Sep21

Climate Change in Tanzania: Farmers are Waiting for solutions

Climate Change in Tanzania:  Farmers are waiting for solutions By Deodatus Mfugale* The farmers in Nyamwage village in Tanzania are facing two challenges:  changing climate and a new disease is affecting the rice crops. The rainfall patten is a real problem in this village. Sometimes it rains unexpectedly: in June, while the rainy season had lond ended in the area and farmers had just harvested their crops , part of the crops was destroyed by “out-of -season rainfall”. These farmers do not know where to find alternatives and they feel left behind.         Deodatus Mfugale is an experienced freelance environmental journalist based in Dar es Salaam Tanzania. He is a media consultant/trainer specializing in environment, climate change, extractives industry and investigative journalism. He works on voluntary basis with the Journalists Environmental Association Of Tanzania (JET) in the areas of writing features, editing and conducting short term training sessions. Currently, he writes as a correspondent for Daily News and The Guardian newspapers, two Tanzanian newspapers. But he was formerly employed by The Guardian Ltd where he served as a news editor, and a features editor before he resigned in 2009. He is now a Board Memberof Shahidi wa Maji (Water Witness). Between 2012 and 2014. He served as a Member to the Advisory Committee of the Climate Change Research, Education and Outreach Programme of the University of Dar es Salaam. He has attended many climate change meetings and other international...

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Small Grants to empower rural communities
Août31

Small Grants to empower rural communities

Small Grants to empower rural communities By DeodatusMfugale Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. August, 30 2017 Recently the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) disclosed  5.2  billion shillings to 60 rural communities in Tanzania ( mainland  and Zanzibar), through the  the Global Environmental Facility Grants Programme(GEF). With these small grants, millions of rural Tanzanians will implement projects ranging from provision of sustainable energy to water supply and sanitation. Projects on climate change adaptation such as fish farming, beekeeping and horticulture will be implemented. These community-based activities in agriculture, fisheries, livestock management, agroforestry and solar energy are meant to address the direct needs of the rural poor. Additionally, other areas will be covered include conservation of water sources, ecotourism, promotion of land use planning and small and artisanal mining. Women empowerment These small grants will not only be able to positively impact the lives of millions of Tanzanians but these financial supports will  also gain valuable skills and experience to the communities on sustainable basis, according to the UNDP. In Western Kilimanjaro, for instance, part of the Lake Natron Ecosystem will focus on building the resilience of local communities to climate change impacts through their participation in development projects. Climate Action Network Tanzania is the lead partner in implementing this project that will promote appropriate ecosystem management through landscape planning. It will also promote gender mainstreaming in climate smart agriculture and other activities.This project aims also to provide space for women, men and youth. It will help them to participate fully in all activities. “It is important to fund activities among rural communities because they are part of the critical dimensions of development,” said the UNDP Officer In Charge, David Omozuafoh. To his view, this project will also protect indigenous knowledge on environment and natural resources and will establish community based ecosystem management committees, through education ( training, learning best practices. “Development activities at community level provide policy feedback on poverty eradication strategies whereas community-based experiences and ideas constitute building blocks for people-centred policies and strategies,” explained the UNDP officer.                      ...

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Comores- Développement Economique: Les îles  vont intégrer la SADC
Juil22

Comores- Développement Economique: Les îles  vont intégrer la SADC

Comores- Développement Economique: Les îles  vont intégrer la SADC La Communauté de Développement d’Afrique Australe* vient d’accepter la demande d’intégration des Comores au sein de son institution. Au mois d’août prochain, cette demande sera officiellement approuvée, lors du Sommet des Chefs d’Etat à Prétoria en Afrique du Sud. Cette entrée dans le développement économique de l’Afrique Australe est perçue comme une réelle opportunité. Analyse.   Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   La Communauté de développement d’Afrique Australe ( en anglais Southern African Development Community)  vient d’accepter la demande des Comores d’entrée dans l’organisation. Au mois d’août prochain, cette demande sera officiellement acceptée lors du Sommet des Chefs d’Etat à Prétoria en Afrique du Sud. Que signifie cette intégration ? Les programmes et projets liés à la protection de l’environnement et au développement  font partie des priorités de la SADC et les Comores peuvent intégrer leur stratégie de développement durable notamment la promotion de la pêche durable, et l’utilisation des énergies renouvelables, mais aussi le développement d’une agriculture plus saine. L’économie bleue : un enjeu considérable D’après le manuel sur l’économie bleue, publié l’an dernier  par la Commission Economique des Nations Unies pour l’Afrique (CEA), il est nécessaire d’impliquer les femmes dans le développement de l’économie bleue. Les Comores, dont la jeune population est composée plus de 50% par les femmes ont la possibilité à travers l’intégration dans la SADC de rebondir sur les recommandations et actions  de  la première conférence continentale sur l’emploi des femmes africaines organisée à Luanda (Angola) en 2015. En effet, depuis cette conférence, l’Union Africaine a établi l’Agenda 2063 qui appelle à renforcer la formation technique et professionnelle ainsi que la formation continue des femmes. L’accès à la connaissance sur l’économie bleue doit passer par l’école maternelle, primaire et secondaire, précise l’agenda 2063. Le développement de l’économie bleue peut aussi permettre aux Comores et à d’autres pays d’Afrique de renforcer des partenariats. D’après le rapport sur l’économie bleue publié par la CEA, les partenariats peuvent favoriser le développement économique des pays impliqués et peuvent aussi aider ces pays à « combler leur lacunes financières et techniques ou l’insuffisance des infrastructures , qui les empêchent d’exploiter pleinement le potentiel de leurs ressources aquatiques ou marines. »   L’économie bleue peut aussi encourager les Etats à résoudre leur contentieux devant les tribunaux.  La CEA cite dans son rapport le cas de Maurice et des Seychelles. En 2008, ces deux états insulaires ont saisi en commun la Commission des limites du plateau continental du dossier des Mascareignes, un plateau d’environ 396 000 km2, situé à l’est de Madagascar. En 2012, les deux pays conclurent un accord de gestion conjointe pour exploiter ensemble les ressources marines , pêche,...

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COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania
Juil14

COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania

COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania Many people remember the last rainy season in May. It has started unusually late. But it has affected people.There are views that the erratic rainy seasons and the high intensity of rainfall are caused by climate change and some negative impacts are now unavoidable. These consequences of human-induced climate change often result in loss and damage.  Analysis by DeodatusMfugale*.     Dar es Salaam July 14, 2017 Many people lost their property Many people remember the last rainy season in May. It has started unusually late. But it has affected people. Residents of Tanga city, located on the Tanzanian northern coast close to the Kenyan border, were pounded by  heavy downpour recently. It was not happened in this town  and around for over four decades. As a result, some sections of roads were washed away by floods while several houses were pulled down. Many people lost their property as some houses were submerged under floodwater. In other places, in one village in Kilimanjaro region, a pastoralist could do nothing but watch helplessly as some of his livestock disappeared during a night. A farmer in Mvomero district of Morogoro region also lost several hectares of maize crop after his farm became waterlogged following heavy rains. Experts said that maize plants cannot survive in pools of water. Several people also lost their lives due to severe flash floods. Agricultural productivity is hardly affected by climate change in Tanzania: soils can no longer support growth of traditional crops. It is forcing people to leave their villages . According to the Ministry for Environment, 61 percent of Tanzania suffer from desertification. “Desertification makes land unsuitable for agriculture and livestock keeping, and Rising sea levels threaten to sink island and saline water has infiltrated freshwater sources, said Sabine Minninger, Climate Change Policy Advisor, Bread for the World. She emphasized: “These have forced members of vulnerable communities to migrate to other areas where they have lost their identity.” Understanding Loss and Damage There are views that the erratic rainy seasons and the high intensity of rainfall are caused by climate change and some negative impacts are now unavoidable. These consequences of human-induced climate change often result in loss and damage.“Loss refers to things that are lost forever and cannot be brought back, such as human lives or species , while damages refer to things that are damaged, but can be repaired or restored, such as roads or embankments, ” explained Saleemul Huq, a senior fellow at the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED). Strengthening flood barriers, planting trees, using new crop varieties and other forms of adaptation...

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