“Southern Africa could create 78,000 new jobs in less than 20 years”- Thelma Munhequete
Déc19

“Southern Africa could create 78,000 new jobs in less than 20 years”- Thelma Munhequete

Southern Africa could create 78,000 new jobs in less than 20 years By Thelma Munhequete*   I have attended the global Gender Climate Alliance Innovation Forum, on the sideline of COP22,  the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change held in Marrakech, Morocco last november. The event was supported by different UN Agencies, organizations and stakeholders. 200 participants from different countries attended the two days event. Different experience and action where shared. Mary Robinson from the Mary Robinson Foundation, addressed the need of bigger and great Dialogues among Women  globally, Regionally and at a country level. Participants  have concentrated efforts to   improve gender balance and increase the participation of women in all UNFCCC processes. The Forum addressed key questions:  Where  Are We?  Where  Are We Going? What topics? How  can we integrate gender into urban climate policy? These are my thoughts. Where Are We? Gender in the communities is a relatively new topic in Mozambique. But it  has not received much attention although it is acknowledged that women and the youth are the most vulnerable groups in the communities. In its response to ensure social safety and protection of the citizens, the Government of Mozambique introduced measures through departments. This is further supported by Policy Frameworks and Legal instruments. As Country Executive Director of Africa Foundation which works  in southern Africa Countries, both in Mozambique and Zambia,  I  shared my experience in Mozambique. The lack   of data  is the main obstacle to integrate climate change, gender mainstream and the sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) simultaneously, in order to reduce poverty, promote food security and further gender equality in my country. Climate change is affecting the youth. In most  cases, the youth helps the family. The decrease in water pressure reduces the reliability of the water borehole in the villages. During drought,people move with their livestock for grazing and so require water. These additional challenges compromise the health condition of the youth as well as the education. It is critical to assess the viability of scaling up successful local solutions as well as identifying new solutions for them. Where  Are We Going? The associated lack of food, water and income is already visible and it’s reaching social consequences such adoption of risky behaviours consuming of alcohol abuse, criminal activities (Poaching), theft and corruption that lead to family breakdowns. We have embraced the principles of gender equality and empowerment of women and youth . Through our affiliation to the Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA), we  aim to mainstream gender in all  projects. We adopted the Global Environment Facility’s Gender Equality Action Plan (GEAP) to guide our gender action plan which forms part...

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Amina J. Mohammed: Next UN Deputy Secretary General
Déc19

Amina J. Mohammed: Next UN Deputy Secretary General

Amina J. Mohammed: Next UN Deputy Secretary General By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Amina J. Mohammed, minister of environment of Nigeria has been appointed last week as  the next UN Deputy Secretary General by the incoming UN Secretary General, Antonio Guterres. She will take her new position on the 1st January 2017. The Nigerian minister was previously special adviser of three Nigerian President, on the Millenium Development Goals for six years. She was also Special Adviser to UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon on Post-2015 Development Planning. She is one the crucial contributors of the Sustainable Development Goals architecture. In a statement given to the Nigerian media, she emphasized her willing to continue to protect Nigeria Environment. She will follow the Nationnally Determined Contributions under the Paris Agreement, the first Sovereign Green Bounds in 2017, and the development of the Great Great Wall. “Over the last 3 decades and during my contribution to the Millennium Development Goals, the Sustainable Development Goals and recently working for environmental protection as part of President Buhari’s vision to transform Nigeria, I have been blessed with the unwavering support and inspiration from leaders, my colleagues, activists, and stakeholders from the polluted creeks in the Niger Delta, to the eroded (Kumaro and Alpha) and overflowing (Makoko) communities in Lagos, Nnaka erosion site in Anambra and others, through the polluted Sharada industrial sites of Kano, the drought affected areas(Bama) in Borno as well as the degraded dunes in Yobe and others parts of the catchment area of the disappearing Lake Chad, ” she declared. “I will continue to work fo the rights of the poor, especially women and the youth, ensuring we leave no one behind,” she added. Amina J Mohammed was Born in 1961, and educated in Nigeria and in the UK.  She  is married with six children.    ...

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Lighting Least Developed Countries
Nov28

Lighting Least Developed Countries

Lighting Least Developed Countries After the UN Climate Conference in Marrakech, a high-level roundtable on African Least Developed Countries access to energy will be held  on 6th December in  Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.   By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache The United Nations Office of the High Representative for Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States (UN-OHRLLS) (http://UNOHRLLS.org), together with EnergyNet (www.EnergyNet.co.uk) will  organize a high-level roundtable on  access to energy in  Africa Least Developed Countries (LDCs)* on 6th December. The discussion will be about how African countries can achieve the three universal goals on sustainable energy. Another meeting will be held from 6 to 8th December: The Africa Energy Forum: Off the Grid Summit (www.AEF-OffGrid.com). It will focus on project opportunities for mini- and off-grid technology providers working in Africa’s energy space. Among participants  Ministries of energy, rural electrification agencies, philanthropic business foundations, banks, regulatory bodies, multilateral organizations and off-grid businesses . They will discuss topical issues concerning rolling-out off-grid projects across Africa, a few weeks  after the UN Climate Conference in Marrakech where the LDCs Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Initiative was launched. What is the LDCs Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Initiative about? The Least Developed Countries Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Initiative is part of  the Marrakech  Global Partnership on Scale Up rapidly  Clean Energy Transformation Worldwide. The Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Initiative (REEEI) for Sustainable Development  was initially announced in  Kinshasa last September where Ministers and heads of delegation from the 48 Least Developed Countries welcomed it. “The initiative will enable LDCs to leapfrog fossil fuel based energy and light up the lives of millions of energy-starved people through modern, clean and resilient energy systems, ” said in Marrakech, Tosi Mpanu-Mpanu, Chair of the Least Developed Countries Group and Head of delegation of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The approach This initiative aims to achieve sustainable development by linking SDGs and the implementation of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. For Least Developed Countries UN Climate group, the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Initiative will support country driven and country owned approach. It has many objectives:  social, economic, poverty and development. These are to enhanced energy access. According to a concept note of the initiative, LDCs want to mobilize and build ambition and capabilities by formulating low to zero emission, resilient, development, pathways. They plan to identify and develop “the most appropriate approaches  to off-grid solutions and community energy in relation to different Country contexts”.  The development of Micro Small and medium sized companies and small scale agriculture and transfer of relevant technologies  will be promoted to enhance access to renewable...

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Marrakech Action Proclamation for  Our Climate And Sustainable Development
Nov20

Marrakech Action Proclamation for Our Climate And Sustainable Development

                                   Marrakech Action Proclamation                                         For  Our Climate And Sustainable Development   Head of State gathered in Marrakech  for the UN Climate Conference on Climate Change. Their signed a statement to signal  a shift towards a new era of implementation and action on climate and sustainable development. Few sentences to keep in mind. Opinion by Heads of State   How they will  respond to climate change? “Our climate is warming at an alarming and unprecedented rate and we have an urgent duty to respond. We welcome the Paris Agreement, adopted under the Convention, its rapid entry into force, with its ambitious goals, its inclusive nature and its reflection of equity and common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in the light of different national circumstances, and we affirm our commitment to its full implementation.” “Indeed, this year, we have seen extraordinary momentum on climate change worldwide, and in many multilateral fora. This momentum is irreversible – it is being driven not only by governments, but by science, business and global action of all types at all levels.Our task now is to rapidly build on that momentum, together, moving forward purposefully to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to foster adaptation efforts, thereby benefiting and supporting the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals.We call for the highest political commitment to combat climate change, as a matter of urgent priority. We call for strong solidarity with those countries most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, and underscore the need to support efforts aimed to enhance their adaptive capacity, strengthen resilience and reduce vulnerability.We call for all Parties to strengthen and support efforts to eradicate poverty, ensure food security and to take stringent action to deal with climate change challenges in agriculture.We call for urgently raising ambition and strengthening cooperation amongst ourselves to close the gap between current emissions trajectories and the pathway needed to meet the long-term temperature goals of the Paris Agreement.” Climate Finance: Crucial “We call for an increase in the volume, flow and access to finance for climate projects, alongside improved capacity and technology, including from developed to developing countries. We the Developed Country Parties reaffirm our USD $100 billion mobilization goal.                                                                                      We, unanimously, call for further climate action and support, well in advance of 2020, taking into account the specific needs and special circumstances of developing countries, the least developed countries and those particularly vulnerable to the adverse impacts of climate change.” The Doha Amendment* “We who are Parties to the Kyoto Protocol encourage the ratification of the Doha Amendment.  We, collectively, call on all non-state actors to join us for immediate...

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DECLARATION OF THE FIRST AFRICA ACTION SUMMIT FOR CONTINENTAL CO-EMERGENCE
Nov17

DECLARATION OF THE FIRST AFRICA ACTION SUMMIT FOR CONTINENTAL CO-EMERGENCE

DECLARATION OF THE FIRST AFRICA ACTION SUMMIT FOR CONTINENTAL CO-EMERGENCE By African heads of State We, the African Heads of State and Government, meeting in Marrakesh on 16 November 2016, at the invitation of His Majesty Mohammed VI, King of Morocco, for the First Africa Action Summit, held on the sidelines of the 22nd Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP22) stress that: – Africa, which has contributed the least to global greenhouse gas emissions, is the continent most affected by climate change and its impacts on its territories, the consequences of which may jeopardize peace, security and sustainable development in Africa; – African regions have voluntarily launched adaptation and mitigation initiatives with a view to enhancing resilience and promoting sustainable development; reaffirm: – the importance of adequate implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals, based on the Rio principles, particularly that of “common but differentiated responsibilities” to rise to the challenge of climate change; – the concrete and substantial commitment of African countries to contribute to global efforts to combat climate change; – our ambition to make climate action a lever of emergence in order to build an inclusive, sustainable development model that meets the legitimate aspirations of African populations and safeguards the interests of future generations; – our desire to work together collectively towards an Africa that is resilient to climate change and that shapes its destiny, through sub-regional and regional approaches; Commit to: – promoting the adaptation measures and policies required, making sure they also serve as catalysts for profound economic and social structural transformation in Africa;   – consolidating our respective commitments to tackle the effects of climate change in order to give more coherence to our strategies and move forward together; – speeding up the implementation of initiatives that have already been identified or launched, not only by building on our own resources, but also by mobilizing multilateral and bilateral donors as well as non-state actors. These include: * initiatives aimed at enhancing our continent’s resilience to the threats of climate change, in particular the “Africa Adaptation Initiative”, the “Adaptation of African Agriculture” initiative, known as “Triple A”, the “Great Green Wall for the Sahara and the Sahel” project, the “Security, Stability and Sustainability” initiative, the “Rural Resilience” initiative and the “Forests in the Mediterranean Region and the Sahel” initiative; * initiatives in favor of an African sustainable co-emergence, in particular the “Africa Renewable Energy Initiative”, the “Conservation of the Lake Chad Basin Ecosystem”, the “Blue Growth” initiative, the “African Clean Energy Corridor” and the “Blue Fund for the Congo Basin” ; – encouraging and facilitating the participation...

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COP 22 : Vers l’arrivée décisive des Chefs D’Etat
Nov14

COP 22 : Vers l’arrivée décisive des Chefs D’Etat

COP 22 : Vers l’arrivée décisive des Chefs D’Etat   Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Quelques jours après le début de négociations sur la mise en œuvre de l’accord de Paris adopté dans la capitale française, en 2015,  et entré en vigueur le 4 novembre dernier, les chefs d’Etat de la planète se rendent à Marrakech pour marquer leur volonté d’agir. Mais, le chemin semble semer d’embûches. L’élection du président américain Donald Trump présente une certaine « incertitude » , selon le président Français, François Hollande.  Cette élection a effectivement marqué les esprits des participants de la Conférence des Parties sur le Climat. Les Etats-Unis vont-ils annuler l’accord de Paris, comme l’avait annoncé le président élu américain lorsqu’il était candidat ?  Et quelles sont  les décisions prises par les négociateurs la semaine dernière ? Retour sur les points importants des négociations. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache L’Accord de Paris est-il en danger ? Depuis lundi 7 novembre, début des discussions, 109 pays couvrant 77% des émissions de gaz à effet de serre ont ratifié l’accord de Paris, tels que l’Australie  et  le Japon, le Botswana et le Burkina Faso. Mais que va devenir cet accord avec le « Brexit » américain ? L’accord de Paris est-il remis en cause ? Oui et non disent de nombreux observateurs. Les actions de mise en œuvre se poursuivront  « Let’s wait and see », affirme en conférence de presse Patricia Espinoza, la Secrétaire Générale de la Convention Cadre des Nations Unies sur les Changements Climatiques.  Elle dit avoir proposé au nouveau président élu de travailler avec lui sur les questions de changements climatiques.  Pour  le Ministre des Affaires Etrangères et de la Coopération du Maroc, Salaheddine Mezouar  l’élection de M. Trump à la présidence française n’est pas une menace : “ Nous devons faire confiance au peuple américain qui sont déterminés et   fortement engagés à lutter contre les changements climatiques.» Des réformes américaines sont-elles en vue ? Fin octobre, l’administration américaine en charge de l’information sur l’énergie avait affirmé dans son dernier rapport que l’énergie solaire est la source d’énergie renouvelable la plus rapide et croissante aux Etats-Unis, et cela devrait continuer. Or, le site de campagne du candidat Trump, aujourd’hui président élu, précise que les actions du président Obama liées aux changements climatiques seront supprimées, notamment le « Clean Power Plan », le  plan Obama pour le climat, la ratification de l’accord de Paris et l’agence pour l’environnement.  Les raisons : ces actions sont jugées  trop couteuses et peu efficaces. Le site toutefois précise que le candidat Trump soutient les énergies renouvelables, mais tient aussi compte  des autres sources d’énergies comme les énergies fossiles. Le facteur rentabilité entrerait donc en jeu dans les décisions. Toutefois, plusieurs questions restent en suspends. Que...

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