Africa: Practising sustainable development with youth
Juil30

Africa: Practising sustainable development with youth

Africa: Practising sustainable development with youth   The African youth wants to take advantage to the ongoing  sustainable development opportunities in the continent. Introduction.   By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache 07-30-2017   Recently, the African youth elected the Interim Executive Board members of the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme CAADP) Youth Network in Uganda. The Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme is an  African Union’s policy framework for agricultural transformation, food security and nutrition, economic growth launched in 2003.   The Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme youth network is a youth ( 18 to 35) platform for farmers, Agroentrepreneurs, Nutritionists, and Agricultural practitioners. Their Goal: Create one million jobs for youth in the Agriculture Value Chain by 2025 and supported Agroentrepreneurs by 2020. Their Focus Areas: Agribusiness, Food Security and Nutrition, Climate Smart Agriculture, Green and Blue Economy. The official launched of this youth network is expected to be held in Dakar ( Sénégal) in September 2017.   What has been done so far?   In October  2016, two African organizations,  the African Youth Initiative on Climate Change (AYICC) and  the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme CAADP Youth Network supported the publication of a book which aims  to establish and promote at least 10,000 youth-led farms and agribusinesses across Africa by 2020. This publication named as “Youth Eco-Smart Projects” was developed by   Fresh & Young Brains Development Initiative. Fresh & Young Brains Development Initiative is a Nigerian youth Non Governmental Organization and the founder is a young Nigerian lawyer, Nkiruka Nnaemego. She is also an agroentrepreneur and development practitioner. Nkiruka and her colleagues from Africa (Ibraheem Ceesay from the Gambia, Mariam Allam from Egypt…) are engaging and  integrating  African youth in the implementation of the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and  Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) processes.   NDCs: “The heart of the Paris Agreement” Hakima El Haite   About the Youth Eco-Smart Projects book   The book has been launched during the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Conference of Parties (COP22) in Morocco   November 10, 2016,  at the Youth Side Event on “ Integrating Youth in the Implementation of the Nationally Determined Contributions  (NDCs) across Africa. This event was indeed  organized by the African Youth Initiative on Climate Change ( AYICC), an African Union initiative launched in 2006 with the aim of mobilizing young people to have one voice on the issues of climate change. The book intends to promote selected youth-led ecologically smart projects and initiatives. It encourages African Governments and Partners to support the selected projects. It finally advocates for more financial support to ensure active youth engagement in sustainable agriculture.   Some Excepts from the...

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Tabi Joda-Column: ” It is  time to reverse the trends!”
Juil30

Tabi Joda-Column: ” It is time to reverse the trends!”

Tabi Joda-Column: ” It is  time to reverse the trends!” In Nigeria, Ghana and Cameroon alone, 50 metric tons of plastic fragments food packages, straws and table water bottles and empty sachet water bags are drained into the Atlantic Ocean every day. But it is time to reverse the trends.  It is everyone’s responsibility not only governments to protect the planet.     Over the last ten years the amount of plastic bags produced and used worldwide surpass the amount produced and used during the whole of the 20th century. Regrettably, 50% of the plastic we use, we just use them once and throw away. If we can place in a heap the amount of plastic bags we throw away into the environment each year, it will stretch from earth to the moon and back twenty five times. Globally, more than one million plastic bags are used every minute and an average individual throws away approximately 185 kg of plastic waste per year. An average household dumps about 900kg of plastic waste in a year. Similarly, an approximate 500 billion plastic bags are used and 135 billion plastic water bottles are thrown away every year. Plastic waste accounts for around 10 percent of the total waste generated in households worldwide.   The disaster Risk!     Every piece of plastic in the ocean breaks down into segments such that pieces from a single liter of plastic bottle could end up on every beach throughout the world. Similarly, almost every farmland is partially covered by plastic. Apart from the harmful effects of plastic bags on animals, plants and aquatic life, the toxic chemical from plastic waste are harmful to the human body when absorbed. A study has shown that apart from Americans who have up to 93% of people tested positive for BPA (a plastic chemical), level of effect are even higher in other parts of the world especially Africa where recycling and waste management policies and orientations are low or even absent in most places. Other studies have shown that some of these compounds found in plastic have been known to alter human hormones or have other potential risk on human health.   Alongside the hazardous risks on human health, over one million sea birds and over 100,000 marine mammals are reportedly killed annually from toxins originating from plastic waste in our oceans. 44% of seabird species, 22% of cetaceans, 32% of sea turtle species and a growing list of fish species, crabs and prawns are killed by plastics or have their habitat altered by plastic in or around their bodies. Plastics also degrade soil quality leading to low crop productivity and consequently poverty,...

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COP 23- Economie bleue: L’Afrique de l’Ouest consolide ses engagements- Déclaration
Juil18

COP 23- Economie bleue: L’Afrique de l’Ouest consolide ses engagements- Déclaration

COP 23- Economie bleue: L’Afrique de l’Ouest consolide ses engagements- Déclaration  13 ministres de la pêche du Comité des pêches du Centre- Ouest  du Golfe de Guinée (FCWC en anglais)  se sont rencontrés récemment à Nouakchott (Mauritanie), dans le cadre de la lutte pour développer  une orientation stratégique pour la seconde phase du Programme Régional des pêches ouest africaines (WARFP) prévue en 2018. Présentation. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache L’Action 13 ministres de la pêche du Comité des pêches du Centre- Ouest du Golfe de Guinée : le Cap-Vert, la Gambie, la Guinée Conakry, la Guinée Bissau, la Mauritanie, le Sénégal, la Sierra Leone, le Bénin, la Côte d’Ivoire, le Liberia, le Nigeria, le Ghana et le Togo, se sont rencontrés récemment à Nouakchott dans le cadre de la lutte  pour développer  une orientation stratégique pour la seconde phase du Programme Régional des pêches ouest africaines (WARFP) prévue en 2018. Cette rencontre à Nouakchott fait suite à l’atelier de sensibilisation du 12 au 14 février 2017 à Sally au Sénégal. Les ministres demandent à la Banque Mondiale de financer la seconde phase du programme Programme Régional des pêches ouest africaines (WARFP) prévue donc en 2018 pour mettre en œuvre des réformes visant à protéger les ressources halieutiques en Afrique de l’Ouest. Face à la surpêche Les 13 ministres ont signé une déclaration conjointe dans laquelle ils reconnaissent le rôle primordial de la  pêche durable dans la lutte contre l’insécurité alimentaire et pour l’augmentation des revenus d’une population grandissante dans les zones côtières d’Afrique de l’Ouest. Dans cette déclaration officielle, ils se disent inquiets de l’étendue de la surpêche, la surcapacité, la pêche illégale, et l’impact des changements climatiques qui ont considérablement appauvris les ressources halieutiques, causants d’ importantes conséquences économiques. Les représentants des 13 pays précisent qu’ils reconnaissent le soutien apporté au Programme Régional des pêches ouest africaines (WARFP). Ce dernier existe depuis 2009. Il est financé par la Banque Mondiale et le Fonds pour l’environnement Mondial, avec pour ambition de renforcer  la gouvernance des pêches, réduire la pêche illégale, améliorer  la valeur ajoutée par le traitement local et la commercialisation des produits issus de la pêche. Les ministres ouest africains se disent satisfaits des résultats obtenus par le programme, notamment par le renforcement des capacités pour le contrôle des ressources halieutiques et l’amélioration des paiements des amendes et des sanctions dans les eaux côtières du Cap-Vert, du Liberia, du Sénégal et de la Sierra Leone.Les 13 signataires ont aussi accueilli favorablement l’initiative du président de la République islamique de Mauritanie pour la promotion de la transparence dans le secteur de la pêche. Cette initiative est soutenue par la Banque Mondiale....

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COP 23- Tonga hosts Pacific meeting on GCF funds
Juil18

COP 23- Tonga hosts Pacific meeting on GCF funds

COP 23- Tonga hosts Pacific meeting on GCF funds 07-18-2017 The Kingdom of Tonga hosts the Green Climate Fund’s Structured Dialogue with the Pacific during four days. This meeting is  organized in collaboration with the Governments of  Australia. It aims to accelerate the implementation of GCF projects and programmes approuved in the Pacific. The meeting has been  launched by the Deputy Prime Minister of Tonga and Minister of MEIDECC, Honourable Siaosi Sovaleni on July 18 at the Faónelua Convention Centre.  The dialogue will open with a High-Level Segment at Faónelua followed by a three-day Technical workshop at Tanoá International Hotel. GCF  Board Members, Secretariat Staff,  ministers of countries in the Pacific, senior government officials, including representatives of the GCF National Designated Entities and Focal points, private sector representatives and civil society organizations  are attending the meeting. The four- day gathering is an opportunity for countries and Accredites Entities to share their experiences in various programmes fund by the GCF. According to the GCF Communication department, the dialogue is expected to help Pacific Island countries identify Accredited Entities and private sector organisations to partner with. It will help identify Accredited Entities, including private sector partners to support the project proposals to fight climate change. This dialogue is  part of the sustained development of a Regional Roadmap initiated in 2016 GCF Regional Meeting which has to help strengthen Pacific Island countries engagement with the...

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COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania
Juil14

COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania

COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania Many people remember the last rainy season in May. It has started unusually late. But it has affected people.There are views that the erratic rainy seasons and the high intensity of rainfall are caused by climate change and some negative impacts are now unavoidable. These consequences of human-induced climate change often result in loss and damage.  Analysis by DeodatusMfugale*.     Dar es Salaam July 14, 2017 Many people lost their property Many people remember the last rainy season in May. It has started unusually late. But it has affected people. Residents of Tanga city, located on the Tanzanian northern coast close to the Kenyan border, were pounded by  heavy downpour recently. It was not happened in this town  and around for over four decades. As a result, some sections of roads were washed away by floods while several houses were pulled down. Many people lost their property as some houses were submerged under floodwater. In other places, in one village in Kilimanjaro region, a pastoralist could do nothing but watch helplessly as some of his livestock disappeared during a night. A farmer in Mvomero district of Morogoro region also lost several hectares of maize crop after his farm became waterlogged following heavy rains. Experts said that maize plants cannot survive in pools of water. Several people also lost their lives due to severe flash floods. Agricultural productivity is hardly affected by climate change in Tanzania: soils can no longer support growth of traditional crops. It is forcing people to leave their villages . According to the Ministry for Environment, 61 percent of Tanzania suffer from desertification. “Desertification makes land unsuitable for agriculture and livestock keeping, and Rising sea levels threaten to sink island and saline water has infiltrated freshwater sources, said Sabine Minninger, Climate Change Policy Advisor, Bread for the World. She emphasized: “These have forced members of vulnerable communities to migrate to other areas where they have lost their identity.” Understanding Loss and Damage There are views that the erratic rainy seasons and the high intensity of rainfall are caused by climate change and some negative impacts are now unavoidable. These consequences of human-induced climate change often result in loss and damage.“Loss refers to things that are lost forever and cannot be brought back, such as human lives or species , while damages refer to things that are damaged, but can be repaired or restored, such as roads or embankments, ” explained Saleemul Huq, a senior fellow at the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED). Strengthening flood barriers, planting trees, using new crop varieties and other forms of adaptation...

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New York – Climate Action : Mobilizing the World
Mai30

New York – Climate Action : Mobilizing the World

    New York – Climate Action : Mobilizing the World Today, the United Nations and NYU Stern School of Business host a conversation on climate action with UN Secretary-General António Guterres. Watch live...

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