World Environment day: ” We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba
Juin05

World Environment day: ” We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba

World Environment day: “We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba*   On World Environment Day, there are plenty of words spoken about the obvious damage being wreaked by climate change – the chaos of hurricanes, wild fires and melting polar ice caps is there for all to see. But there’s another more hidden casualty of this new world of rising temperatures, drought, and increased natural disasters:  the education of our young people. At the simplest level, the wilder weather that we’re already seeing means children are prevented from getting to school. Hurricanes Irma and Harvey meant 1.7 millionUS students were temporarily unable to go to school last year – and officials in Puerto Rico have also recently announced plans to close over 280 schools following the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria. “Climate change is compounding educational inequalities that already exist” In wealthier nations, the damage caused by the increasing occurrence of extreme weather events more often than not tends to cause temporary disruption to children’s education.  But in poorer countries, the consequences can be far more long lasting. Buildings and infrastructure can take months or years to rebuild, with devastating implications for learning. Girls are most likely to be taken out of school in the wake of climate-related shocks, as was found in studies in Pakistan and Uganda after natural disasters there. So, indirectly, climate change is compounding educational inequalities that already exist. But the hardest hit parts of the world are those where universal education is still denied millions and Sub-Saharan Africa is on the front lines. Adult literacyrates are around 65%, compared to a global average of 86%. Here, over a fifth of childrenaged 6-11 are out of school, and a third of those aged 12-14. In Rwanda, we know the devastating impact of being forced from one’s home can have on a child’s education. But the big refugee crises of the future will not just be driven by war, but by the environment, with experts warning tens of millionsare likely to be displaced in the next decade by droughts and crop failures brought about by climate change.  What’s more, rising temperatures are predicted to result in the spread of lethal diseases. It is thought that a 2°C rise in temperatures could lead to an additional 40-60 million people in Africa being exposed to malaria. The disease is already one of the most significant factors in student absenteeism on the continent, with estimates ranging from 13 – 50%depending on the region.  Environmental changes are diminishing children’s education in other ways too. Malnourishmentdirectly affects children’s ability to learn. The World Food Programme has identified hunger and malnutrition as one of the most significant impacts of...

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COP 23- Afrique- Pacifique : le Fonds vert  en quelques chiffres
Juil27

COP 23- Afrique- Pacifique : le Fonds vert  en quelques chiffres

COP 23- Afrique- Pacifique : le Fonds vert  en quelques chiffres Quelques années après son opérationnalisation, le fonds vert s’exprime sur ses actions liées à la mise en œuvre de la finance climatique en Afrique et dans le pacifique. Les chiffres. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache 27-07-2017   En Afrique Le Fonds vert des Nations Unies pour le Climat vient d’attribuer  700 000 dollars au Ministère des Ressources Naturelles du Rwanda, une des agences accréditées par le fonds vert qui bénéficient  d’un accès direct . Ces 700 000  dollars  permettent au Rwanda de soutenir ses projets climat, à travers l’instrument de préparation de projet du fonds vert ( Project Preparation Facility en anglais), d’après un récent communiqué de presse venant du Fonds Vert pour le Climat. Le Project Preparation Facility peut financer des projets jusqu’à 1,5 million de dollars sous forme de dons ou de subventions remboursables, précise le communiqué de presse du fonds. Le Fonds vert pour le Climat  a aussi alloué 120 000 dollars à la Mauritanie pour ses activités liées au programme de préparation d’accès au fonds. Ce programme de préparation ( Readiness Programme en anglais) vise à renforcer les capacités des institutions ou des points focaux pour assister les pays dans leur stratégie de planification d’adaptation et d’accès au fonds. Le Pacifique Dans le pacifique, le fonds vient d’attribuer  130 000 dollars au Secrétariat de la Communauté  du Pacifique (Secretariat of the Pacific Community en anglais),  une organisation gouvernée par 26 petites Etats Insulaires en développement (SIDS) qui coordonne la mise en application des projets d’adaptation et d’atténuation de lutte contre les changements climatiques dans le pacifique. Cette somme dédiée à l’assistance de préparation ( Readiness Programme) d’accès au fonds s’intègre dans le financement de 300 000 dollars de dons annoncé par le fonds vert pour  le Secrétariat de la Communauté du Pacifique. Les avancées A travers un partenariat avec le Programme des Nations Unies pour le Développement, le fonds verts a aussi débloqué environ 1,4 millions de dollars pour renforcer les capacités des programmes climatiques en Egypte, au Ghana, en Jordanie, aux Maldives, au Népal et aux îles Tonga. A ce jour, le fonds vert a débloqué plus de 9 millions de dollars pour les activités de préparation d’accès au fonds dans les pays en de développement. D’après les directives générales  du Fonds Vert pour le Climat, les autorités nationales désignées ou entités accréditées peuvent demander le soutien pour la préparation d’accès au fonds ainsi que  pour le renforcement des capacités du genre. Les femmes peuvent obtenir des formations et des renforcements de capacités à travers des partenariats avec des organisations, bilatérales, multilatérales et internationales, mais aussi avec des ONG. Le fonds peut aussi...

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Montreal Protocol-Kigali: Countries agree to curb powerful greenhouse gases
Oct15

Montreal Protocol-Kigali: Countries agree to curb powerful greenhouse gases

 Montreal Protocol-Kigali:  Countries agree to curb powerful greenhouse gases By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Victory During  the Montreal  Protocol talks in Kigali ( Rwanda), developed and  developing countries have committed to freeze and then reduce their production and use of Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). According to United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), this  reduction  could prevent up to 0.5 degrees Celsius of global warming by the end of this century. “It is not often you get a chance to have a 0.5-degree centigrade reduction by taking one single step together as countries – each doing different things perhaps at different times, but getting the job done,” said US Secretary of State John Kerry. Hydrofluorocarbons , “ the world’s fastest growing greenhouse gases”,  are  commonly used in refrigeration and air conditioning as substitutes for ozone-depleting substances, recalled UNEP. “This is about much more than the ozone layer and HFCs. It is a clear statement by all world leaders that the green transformation started in Paris is irreversible and unstoppable. It shows the best investments are those in clean, efficient technologies, “explained UN Environment chief Erik Solheim What’s next? The next step of the  Kigali amendment will be to phase down HFCs by 2019 for developed countries, and from 2024 to 2028 for developing countries. By the late 2040, all countries will be in line with their respective baselines. Climate Action Network (CAN)  hopes that countries will accelerate their national ambition over time but soon enough to give a fighting chance for the world to limit global temperature rise to 1.5 C. “It is crucial that in the coming years countries work towards transitioning to energy efficient and environment friendly alternatives. The agreed technology review will help with rapid maturity of alternatives and enable countries to strengthen their actions,”  said Climate Action Network ( CAN) . The exact amount of additional funding will agreed at the next meeting of the Montreal Protocol in 2017, with grants for research and development as an immediate priority. “To aid the switch to newer and safer natural refrigerants, sufficient funding will be required through the Montreal Protocol’s Multilateral Fund to enable poorer countries to invest in the new technology. It is vital that developed countries also share their progress on technological breakthroughs,”  called Benson Ireri, Senior Policy Advisor, Christian Aid. The Kigali Amendment comes a few days after two other climate action milestones: sealing the international deal to curb emissions from aviation and achieving the critical mass of ratifications for the Paris climate accord to enter into force. “The Kigali Amendment, just prior to the adoption of the Paris Agreement, brings concrete global action to fight catastrophic global warming. Still,...

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