COP 23 : A half victory for developing countries
Nov18

COP 23 : A half victory for developing countries

COP 23 : A half victory for  developing countries   The Un Climate Change negotiations ended at nearly 7 o’clock this morning with a song from the Fijians.  Started two weeks ago, these negotiations make time to find any compromise between developed and developing countries. As usual. The story. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   The implementation of the Paris Agreement have many issues: adaptation and mitigation through the NDCs, loss and damage,   adaptation,  adaptation fund, finance, transfer of technology, transparency, support and capacity building. Most of all these elements have been taken separately through a facilitative dialogue launched during COP 21 in Paris and pursued in Marrakech during COP 22, then in Bonn with the Fiji presidency, and  the Talanoa Dialogue, a conversation between north and south representatives to achieve the long term pathway to 1,5°Celsius.   The Talanoa Dialogue “ We have been doing the job that we were given to do: advance the implementation guidelines of the Paris Agreement, and prepare for more ambitions actions for the Talanoa dialogue in 2018,” said the  Prime minister of Fiji and president of COP 23, Frank Bainimarama. For the Prime Minister of Fiji, there has been a positive momentum in various areas in COP 23 : the global community has embraced the Fiji  concept of grand coalition for greater ambition linking national governments, states and cities, civil society, the private sector and all women around the world.“ We have  launched a global partnership  to provide millions of climate vulnerable people an affordable access to insurance,” said the president of COP 23. For him, this COP has  put people first. It has connected the people who are not experts on climate change to the UN Climate  negotiations. According to him, putting people first showed to the world that these people are facing climate change in their daily lives. What has been achieved? Saturday, 2.40 Am, the African negotiators left again the negotiations rooms and were happy:   “ We got it Adaptation Fund and Article 9.5,” said Ambassador Nafo from Mali and head of the African group of negotiators. The decisions adopted in Bonn explained that there will be modalities for the accounting of financial resources provided and mobilized through public intervention in accordance to the article 9 of the Paris Agreement. The Article 9.5 of the Paris Agreement has mentionned that the Developed country Parties shall biennially communicate indicative quantitative and qualitative information related to finance of both mitigation and adaptation. Back and Forth Last night was marked by Back and Forth from all the delegates. And it continued earlier  this morning.  At 3am, the Republic of Ecuador on behalf of the G77+...

Read More
COP 23: A fellowship programme launched for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries
Nov17

COP 23: A fellowship programme launched for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries

COP 23: A fellowship programme for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries   A new one year  Programme titled “Capacity Award Programme to Advance Capabilities and Institutional Training  (CAPACITY) will be implemented by the Government of Italy and UN Climate Change. Explanations. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache The  Government of Italy and UN Climate Change have signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to launch a new Fellowship Programme aimed at strengthening the institutional capacity of the Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) to respond to the challenges arising from climate change. How will it work? It will support innovative analytical work on climate change in the context of sustainable development, promote a network of experts who can bring creating and innovative options to bear on questions of climate change, encourage the leadership potential of young and promising professionals in the fields. For  Patricia Espinosa, UN Climate Change Executive Secretary, this programme “marks an important step forward in our endeavor to ensure widest possible support to SIDS and LDC countries to combat climate change and help them build institutional capacity to resilience to climate impacts.” The government of Italy will provide support to launch this fellowship programme, according to Mrs Espinosa. Italy has agreed to provide a funding of 2,500,000 euros for the fellowship programme, which will initially be launched for a period for five years. Adaptation to climate change  in developing countries is crucial to enable these countries to Pursure the common objectives of developed and developing countries for sustainable development in a climate-friendly manner, said Gian Luca Galletti, the Italian Minister of the Environment, Land and Sea.   Who can have access to this programme?   SIDS and LDC mid-career professionals who are working in a broad range of national, regional, and local governmental organizations, ranging from educational institutions, research institutes and ministries are the target of this programme. Italy has agreed to provide a funding of 2,500,000 euros for the fellowship programme, which will initially be launched for a period for five years.   Annually, up to five one year fellowships will be awarded that can be further extended by one year. Selected fellows will have the opportunity to gain exposure to a wide range of opportunities available the UN Climate Change Secretariat in Bonn, Germany. They will be able to work on projects relating to the Paris Agreement, including Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), global climate action agenda, finance, legal, regulatory and institutional framework....

Read More
COP 23: Commission Sahel- ” Nous partageons les mêmes défis”- Issifi Boureima
Nov16

COP 23: Commission Sahel- ” Nous partageons les mêmes défis”- Issifi Boureima

COP 23: Commission Sahel- ” Nous partageons les mêmes défis”- Issifi Boureima En marge des travaux de la 23ème Conférence des Nations Unies sur les Changements Climatiques, Issifi Boureima,  le conseiller technique du président du Niger en charge du Climat,  et président du groupe de travail conjoint des experts pour la Commission Climat pour la région du Sahel se confie à Era Environnement, dans un entretien fleuve, sur les enjeux de la Commission Sahel et ses solutions pour le développement de l’Afrique. Interview. Propos recueillis par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Era Environnement: La Commission Sahel a été annoncée en marge de la COP 23, un an après cette annonce, quelles sont les actions entreprises et quel bilan faîtes-vous de vos actions ? Issifi Boureima: La commission a été effectivement lancée en marge de la COP 22,  lors du Sommet de Haut Niveau organisé par le roi du Maroc. Pendant ce sommet une  décision importante a été prise: la création de trois commissions dont la Commission Sahel présidée par le Niger, la Commission du bassin du Congo, dirigée par la présidence de la République du Congo et la Commission des Petits Etats Insulaires en Développement dont la présidence est tenue par le Seychelles. Depuis la COP 22, la Commission Sahel  a mis en place une équipe d’experts autour du ministre de l’environnement de notre pays. Après cette action  nationale, un certain nombre de documents ont été préparés et  envoyés aux différents pays des trois Commissions.   Pour la Commission Sahel, notre premier travail consistait donc à à identifier les pays  membres de cette Commission. Sur le plan climatique, le sahel se définit par le principal indicateur qui est la isohyète (la courbe joignant les points recevant la même quantité de précipitations)   et  se caractérise par une pluviométrie allant de  150 millimètres  à 600 millimètres. Nous avons ainsi défini un espace allant de la Gambie à la corne de l’Afrique. La commission Sahel est composée par  17 pays dont l’Ethiopie, l’Erythrée, Djibouti et aussi  le Cap vert qui se retrouve également dans la Commission des Petits Etats Insulaires en Développement. Le Cap Vert est en fait le 18 ème pays.  Nous avons aussi intégré  le Cameroun : sa pointe nord est au Sahel et  il y  a certains défis que nous partageons avec ce pays notamment la sauvegarde du bassin du lac Tchad. Nous voulons  créer de bonnes conditions de travail à travers  la  synergie entre les trois commissions. Le Cap vert et le Cameroun sont les pays qui peuvent faire l’interface entre les différentes Commissions. La Commission Sahel est-elle donc opérationnelle ? Pour le moment, nous  sommes en phase de préparation. Nous avons préparé deux documents importants sous...

Read More
COP 23: “no time to waste”
Nov07

COP 23: “no time to waste”

 The 2017 UN Climate Change Conference opened on Monday, with the aim of launching nations towards the next level of ambition needed to tackle global warming and put the world on a safer and more prosperous development path, recalled the UNFCCC Secretariat at the opening ceremony. Explanations. By Houmi AHAMED-MIKIDACHE in Bonn   Two years after the adoption of the Paris Climate Change Agreement, this conference held in Bonn and presided by Fiji, the first small island developing state to have this role. “The human suffering caused by intensifying hurricanes, wildfires, droughts, floods and threats to food security caused by climate change means there is no time to waste,” said Mr Frank Bainimarama, the Prime Minister of Fiji and president of COP 23. Critical According to the World Meteorological Organization, 2017 will be one of the three hottest years on records with many high-impact events including catastrophic hurricanes and floods, debilating heatwaves and drought. “The past three years have all been in the top three years in terms of temperature records. This is part of a long term warming trend,” said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas. And he added:  “We have witnessed extraordinary weather, including temperatures topping 50 degrees Celsius in Asia, record-breaking hurricanes in rapid succession in the Caribbean and Atlantic reaching as far as Ireland, devastating monsoon flooding affecting many millions of people and a relentless drought in East Africa. One of the consequences of climate change is food insecurity in developing countries especially. A review of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) found that, in developing countries, agriculture (crops, livestock, fisheries, aquaculture and forestry) accounted for 26% of all the damage and loss associated with medium to large-scale storms, floods and drought. For Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change, it is urgent to act. “The thermometer of risk is rising; the pulse of the planet is racing; people are hurting; the window of opportunity is closing and we must go Further and Faster Together to lift ambition and action to the next defining level, “she said. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the global health impacts of heatwaves depend not only on the overall warming trend, but on how heatwaves are distributed across where people live. Recent research shows that the overall risk of heat-related illness or death has climbed steadily since 1980, with around 30% of the world’s population now living in climatic conditions that deliver prolonged extreme heatwaves. Between 2000 and 2016, the number of vulnerable people exposed to heatwave events has increased by approximately 125 million. The negotiations According to UNFCCC secretariat, COP23 negotiators are keen to move forward on other...

Read More
COP 23-Madagascar : Conférence régionale sur la surveillance maritime des pêches
Juil04

COP 23-Madagascar : Conférence régionale sur la surveillance maritime des pêches

COP23- Madagascar : Conférence régionale sur la surveillance maritime des pêches Madagascar accueillera du 18 au 21 juillet prochain la deuxième conférence des ministres des pêches des Etats du Sud-Ouest de l’océan Indien. Explications. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   La coopération Madagascar accueillera du 18 au 21 juillet prochain la deuxième conférence des ministres des pêches des Etats du Sud-Ouest de l’océan Indien. Dans le cadre du Plan régional de surveillance des pêches (PRSP), huit Etats  ainsi que l’Union européenne (UE), mais aussi des représentants de l’Afrique du Sud, de la Somalie et des Maldives participeront aux travaux de la conférence. 10 ans après la création du Plan régional de surveillance des pêches, cette conférence est une opportunité de présenter les réussites de ce mécanisme régional de coopération contre la pêche illégale et de réitérer l’engagement des Etats à poursuivre leurs efforts collectifs, précise un communiqué de la Commission de l’Océan Indien (COI). « Le PRSP témoigne de l’utilité de la coopération, en l’occurrence dans la lutte contre la pêche illicite non reportée et non règlementée (INN) qui reste une menace pour les économies du Sud-Ouest de l’océan Indien, » explique Hamadi Boléro le Secrétaire Général de la Commission de l’Océan Indien (COI). Et d’ajouter : « Quelque 6,4 millions de km2 de zones économiques exclusives  ont pu être préservées et ce mécanisme est ainsi devenu une composante majeure du partenariat COI-UE pour la préservation des ressources halieutiques, particulièrement thonières. » Les données Selon la FAO, environ 20% des captures totales des thonidés dans le Sud-Ouest de l’océan Indien proviennent de la pêche INN, ce qui représente 400 millions de dollars à la première vente soit un milliard de dollars en termes de valeur ajoutée annuellement : un manque à gagner considérable pour les économies de la région. Conscients de cet enjeu économique mais aussi écologique et sécuritaire, les ministres des Pêches des huit Etats participants signeront, à l’issue de la conférence, une déclaration commune visant à renforcer ce mécanisme régional de lutte contre la pêche illicite non reportée et non réglementée. En amont de la conférence, une centaine d’experts nationaux et internationaux vont dresser le bilan des activités et des progrès réalisés par le PRSP sur le plan juridique, technique et humain. Ils élaboreront notamment un système de financement durable. « Nous avons aujourd’hui tous les critères pour devenir un centre d’excellence pour la région : la mutualisation des efforts issus du PRSP constitue un volet majeur de nos activités », relève Sunil Sweenarain, coordinateur du programme SmartFish de la COI financé par l’Union Européenne. Que représente le Plan Régional de surveillance des pêches ? Le Plan régional de surveillance des pêches  est mis en œuvre depuis dix ans par les cinq...

Read More
Climat- Afrique: “Il faut qu’il y ait une cohérence”- Seyni Nafo
Juil02

Climat- Afrique: “Il faut qu’il y ait une cohérence”- Seyni Nafo

  Climat- Afrique: “Il faut qu’il y ait une cohérence”- Seyni Nafo Propos recueillis par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache 02-07-2017 A quelques mois de la conférence des Nations sur le climat, prévue à Bonn ( Allemagne), mais organisée par les Iles Fidji, le président du groupe des négociateurs africains, Seyni Nafo se confie sur plusieurs sujets brûlants. Entretien.   Eraenvironnement.com: Vous sillonnez actuellement le monde dans le cadre de vos activités.  Vous avez notamment participé à la première réunion sur le bilan de la COP 22 au Maroc. Il y a une polémique autour des projets issus de l’initiative d’accès à l’énergie. La société civile dénonce une mainmise de l’Union Européenne et de la France. Qu’en pensez-vous ?   Seyni Nafo: Non, il n’y a pas de mainmise de l’Union Européenne et de la France. Il y a un peut-être un déficit de communication.  Ce n’est pas un conseil d’administration classique. Le conseil d’administration est un conseil africain de sept africains des régions du nord, de l’ ouest, de l’ est, et du sud avec en plus le président de la Banque Africaine de Développement et celui de l’Union Africaine, avec en plus deux membres non régionaux, l’Union Européenne et la France, au nom de l’ensemble des partenaires qui se sont engagés à Paris en 2015. Le président Condé, en tant que coordinateur des énergies pour l’Afrique et président en exercice de l’Union Africaine a demandé aux français et aux européens sur la base de ce qu’il y a comme pipeline, sur la base des projets  de pipeline, de préparer une liste initiale qu’ils seraient certain de  financer. La polémique est liée à un problème de communication. Une décision prise par les chefs d’Etat lors d’un conseil d’administration peut être critiquée. Mais l’énergie est une urgence. L’approbation des projets est une décision des chefs d’Etats, ce n’est pas la France, ni le commissaire de l’Union Européenne qui vont les manipuler et les influencer. Que voulez-vous dire ? Ce qu’il faut comprendre, c’est qu’un chef d’Etat ce n’est  pas un ministre et un ministre, ce n’est pas un négociateur, un négociateur ce n’est pas la société civile. Je pense que pour  le président Alpha Condé et un certain nombre de chefs d’Etat, plus de deux ans après le lancement de l’initiative, annoncée pendant la COP 21 en 2015,  il est temps de montrer que l’initiative est en marche. Pour eux, La manière de le faire ce sont les projets. Il y a eu des négociations en ce sens. Pourquoi  le scientifique  Youba Sokona a-t-il démissionné de ses fonctions de directeur du service d’exécution de l’initiative d’accès à l’énergie en Afrique ? Il y a eu...

Read More

En continuant à utiliser le site, vous acceptez l’utilisation des cookies. Plus d’informations

Les paramètres des cookies sur ce site sont définis sur « accepter les cookies » pour vous offrir la meilleure expérience de navigation possible. Si vous continuez à utiliser ce site sans changer vos paramètres de cookies ou si vous cliquez sur "Accepter" ci-dessous, vous consentez à cela.

Fermer