COP 22-  Knowledge and Learning: Strategies for Managing Climate Change
Nov05

COP 22- Knowledge and Learning: Strategies for Managing Climate Change

COP 22-  Knowledge and Learning: Strategies for Managing Climate Change By Olumide Idowu   Education: the key Many Africans are aware that some changes occur in the environment year in and year out but they need to understand  such change: increased disease, food shortages, and extreme flooding at various localities during certain periods of the year. Yet there have been no efforts to reduce the occurrences or avert them altogether. It is urgent to educate the public of the signs of climate change as well as management and prevention strategies. Many of us are aware that climate change is severely affecting livelihoods in Africa through changes in rainfall patterns. About seventy percent of the farmers expressed that their crops were washed away by floods, eliminating their yields for consumption or sale. In some part of West African countries the fishermen were not spared since they could not catch as much fish as they used to and the environment was not conducive for human life since all the debris washed away by water or flood was deposited at various places. About 70 percent of them at various fishing ports lamented that they suffer this disaster yearly but do not have the solution to their problems. According to Zack [1], Knowledge Management consists of a series of strategies and practice used in an organization to identify, create, distribute and enable adoption of insights and experiences. Such insights and experiences consist of knowledge integrated into or embodied in organizational theories and practice [2]. For many years, researchers have explored local knowledge about environmental change and increasingly over the past decade, local knowledge in relation to climate change specifically. They know much more about the content of the different types of knowledge that are important for responding to climate change-from modeling future rainfall changes in a particular country to how to get the most out of an agricultural environment in highly variable conditions. However, they still do not know how to translate these different forms of knowledge into practice and make them accessible to policymakers, front-line staff (such as agricultural extension officers or health workers), and people in poor communities on the ground. They also have a poor grasp of strategies for bringing together people from different backgrounds and starting points, so that they can reconcile what they know. Bringing together different perspectives is important for both the quality and legitimacy of decisions about adaptation [3]. In African schools, practical demonstrations are needed in order for children to actively use their acquired knowledge and skills to improve society. Teachers should also demonstrate the importance of agriculture in the growth of the nation. In...

Read More
COP 22-Comores- Les océans: “L’Afrique et  Oman, c’est une longue histoire”- Vice-Ministre omanais Hamed Said Al Oufi
Sep18

COP 22-Comores- Les océans: “L’Afrique et Oman, c’est une longue histoire”- Vice-Ministre omanais Hamed Said Al Oufi

COP 22-Comores- Les océans: “L’Afrique et  Oman, c’est une longue histoire”- Vice-Ministre omanais Hamed Said Al Oufi Diplômé d’un PHD,   gestion des pêches et économie,  obtenu à l’Université de Hull en Angleterre,  Dr. Hamed Said Al Oufi est Vice- ministre de l’Agriculture et des pêches du Sultanat d’Oman depuis une décennie. Spécialiste du développement et de la mise en œuvre de projets spécifiques à la pêche, M. Said Al Oufi,  revient en marge de la conférence ministérielle des économies des océans, sur l’importance des ressources halieutiques et les relations historiques entre l’Afrique et Oman. Au mois de décembre prochain, Oman et les Comores organisent une conférence internationale sur Oman et l’Afrique intitulée « Oman et les relations avec les Etats de la Corne de l’Afrique ». Depuis les années 70, le Sultanat d’Oman se dote d’une économie diversifiée , introduite par le Sultan Qabous Bin Said. Depuis 1976, le Sultanat a adopté des Plans quinquennaux visant à préserver la stabilité de la position financière et économique d’Oman, à travers un équilibre de développement des différents gouvernorats.Les secteurs de l’agriculture et la pêche ont un rôle important dans le quotidien des omanais. Nombreux sont les omanais à vivre de ces secteurs.  Ces secteurs  représentent  406,1 millions de Rial Omanais du Produit Intérieur Brut  d’Oman en 2014, soit une hausse de 9,4 pour cent sur le chiffre de 371,2 millions enregistré en 2013. Avec une croissance de 2% par rapport à 2013, le secteur de l’agriculture est  passé de 1.484,000 tonnes d’exportation en 2013 à 1,515 000 tonnes de produits en 2014. Cette croissance est liée, selon le gouvernement, a une meilleure productivité des surfaces consacrées aux légumes ( 313,000 tonnes en 2013 à 335, 000 tonnes en 2014), par l’usage des technologies  modernes. Avec 211 000 tonnes de poissons pêchés en 2014 contre 206 000 tonnes en 2013, le secteur de la pêche est en légère hausse. C’est l’un des principaux vecteurs économique du pays. La pêche issue de technique traditionnelle représente  98% de la production. Attaché à l’environnement, le Sultanat d’Oman interdit le chalutage de fond, technique néfaste aux stockage et à la préservation de l’écosystème marin.   Entretien.     Eraenvironnement.com: Comment votre population comprend les questions de pêche ?   Dr Hamed Said Al Oufi:Oman a une très forte culture de pêche. Pendant très longtemps Oman dominait l’Océan Indien dans le commerce maritime.   Oman a travaillé  dans le monde entier,  avec des pays comme l’Inde, la Chine, et le continent africain. Cette culture a été transmise à travers les générations. La pêche est donc est très appréciée par la jeune génération à Oman. Surtout de nos jours, avec les efforts du gouvernement...

Read More
COP 22- Ethiopia- Paris Agreement : strategic orientation for African countries- CCDA-VI
Sep15

COP 22- Ethiopia- Paris Agreement : strategic orientation for African countries- CCDA-VI

COP 22- Ethiopia- Paris Agreement : strategic orientation for African countries- CCDA-VI By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache The sixth annual Climate Change and Development in Africa (CCDA–VI) Conference organized under the auspices of the Climate Change and Development in Africa (ClimDev-Africa) programme, will be held in Addis Ababa from the 17 th to 20th of October. Overall objective : understanding the implementation implications, nuances, challenges and opportunities of the Paris Agreement for Africa in the context of the continent’s development priorities.  This conference will particularly focus its attention to means of implementation of the agreement for accessing finance and technology transfer which are among the national development priorities of african countries. Deepen understanding of the nuances in the decisions of COP21, particularly with regard to  means of implementation (capacity, finance and technology transfer), as well the domestication of the agreement in Africa in alignment with national development priorities of African countries With many experts from Africa and around the world, this conference will provide a marketplace for innovative solutions that integrates climate change into development processes, according to the organizers. It will embrace the Paris Climate Agreement within the framework of Africa Union ’s development aspirations as underscored in Agenda 2063 and Agenda 2030 on Sustainable Development, with a vision of ‘leaving no one behind’. UN-ECA Coordinator for the African Climate Policy Centre (ACPC) Dr. Fatima Denton recently interviewed by the Ethiopian Herald said that Ethiopia has designed visible low carbon strategies  with hydro-power development, forestry and agriculture. Ethiopia, in East Africa is one of the lead countries in  Africa which develops climate resilient green economy initiative, experts said.    ...

Read More
COP 22-Hamed Said Al-Oufi: ” We want to maintain links with Africa”
Sep06

COP 22-Hamed Said Al-Oufi: ” We want to maintain links with Africa”

COP 22-Hamed Said Al-Oufi: ” We want to maintain links with Africa” By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Since the seventies, the Sultan Qabous Bin Said introduced an economic diversification in Oman policy. Indeed, in  1976, the Sultanate adopted five-years plans in order to safeguard the financial and economic stability of the country with a balance development of the various governorates. The Ministry of Agriculture, in collaboration with the FAO works on a sustainable development action plan on the agricultural sector in the horizon 2040. With the aim to achieve food security, reduce importation of fruits and vegetables and to integrate the population in the agricultural sector. 98% of the technic to capture the fishes in Oman are traditional. Located in the middle east, in the south of the Arabia Peninsula, the Sultanate of Oman has a strategic geographical position, with a very strong history shared with Eastern Africa ( trade, culture…). With an average population of 4 726 413 estimated in January 2016, the country is largely depend on the oil resources ( 9, 16 billions OR*, including 7, 7 billions OR of the oil net revenues). The agricultural and fisheries sectors play an important role in the daily lives of the omanis. These sectors represent 406.1 millions OR of the Oman GDP in 2014. Oman is exporting its products for many years in India, Africa and in the Gulf region…The fisheries sector increased slightly from 2013 to 2014, 211 000 fishes were captured in 2013, whereas in 2013, there were  206 000. In Oman, bottom trawling is prohibited as the Sultanate is committed to preserve the environment and the marine ecosystem. 98% of the technic to capture the fishes in Oman are traditional. Since 2014, the Sultanat of Oman has established a new program on aquaculture to help growing the fishing industry. In Duqm, an industrial zone, in the South of Muscat, the omani government has created in 2011 the economic authority Duqm. Dr Hamed Said Al Oufi,, Undersecretary, Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries Wealth of the Sultanate of  Oman was recently in Mauritius for the Conference on Ocean Economies and Climate Change. He gaves his view on Oman, Africa and blue economy Listen the interview of  Mr Said Al Oufi Interview Minister of Fisheries Oman       Second part of the interview  ...

Read More
COP 22- Maurice : L’Economie bleue intelligente en Afrique : des opportunités à saisir
Août31

COP 22- Maurice : L’Economie bleue intelligente en Afrique : des opportunités à saisir

COP 22- Maurice : L’Economie bleue intelligente en Afrique : des opportunités à saisir Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   Pointe aux Piments A Pointe aux Piments,  au nord  ouest de l’île Maurice, dans l’océan indien, dans une plage de sable fin, prêt d’une eau limpide, mais face  à une érosion côtière prononcée, quelques pêcheurs affirment travailler dans des conditions  difficiles, devant faire face à la pollution,  la pêche illégale, sans contrôle ni accompagnement de l’Etat. Or, d’après  le gouvernement Mauricien,  105 cas de pêche illégale ont été établis ainsi que 84 200 roopies d’amendes infligées, suite aux opérations de contrôle menée par  cinq Flying Squads du Fisheries Protection Service (FPS)* menées durant la période de janvier à juin 2016. De janvier 2016 à août 2016,  Le FPS, le centre de protection de la pêche a saisi 22 équipements de pêche sous-marine. Environ 4 100 patrouilles à terre et 370 en mer ont été effectuées. 366 points de vente ont fait l’objet de vérification et les officiers du FPS ont aussi mené 399 exercices de contrôle auprès des poissonniers, rapporte le site internet du gouvernement Mauricien. Mais les  pêcheurs professionnels de pointe aux piments semblent esseulés et sont mécontents.  « Certains pêcheurs mieux équipés vont pourtant dans les eaux profondes malgré la fermeture de la pêche à l’ourite, » martèlent-t-ils. A l’île Maurice, depuis le 15 août, la pêche au poulpe, localement appelée « ourite » est fermée jusqu’au 15 octobre 2016. Cette mesure,  lancée l’année dernière dans la région sud-ouest de l’île, permet aux poissons de se reproduire,  indique le site internet gouvernemental. D’après  le ministère de l’Economie océanique, des Ressources marines, de la Pêche, des Services maritimes de Maurice,  le nombre d’ourites pêchées a connu une baisse ces dernières années. « Alors que 81 tonnes ont été pêchées en 2006, le chiffre est passé à 34 tonnes en 2015, et cette année il est prévu qu’environ 29 tonnes seront pêchées. La surpêche est une des raisons de cette état des lieux, » explique le ministère. Les pêcheurs de pointe aux piments affirment n’avoir aucune autre alternative. « Il n’y a pratiquement plus d’autres  poissons », se plaignent-ils. La pêche au poulpe La pêche au poulpe constitue une activité économique traditionnelle transmise  de génération à génération à Maurice, mais aussi sur l’île autonome voisine : Rodrigues*. Cette pêche se pratique essentiellement aux bords des côtes rocheuses. Avec des techniques traditionnelles : les pêcheurs utilisent des tiges métalliques pour fouiller les cavités dans lesquelles se réfugient les poulpes. «  Ces pêcheurs font ce métier  par défaut : ils le font  pour survivre depuis des années, » explique journaliste spécialiste des questions de pêche , David Casimir. Et d’ajouter : « On comprend leur appréhension face à la...

Read More
Comores- Préparation de la Conférence Internationale: «  Oman et les relations avec les Etats de la Corne de l’Afrique »
Août06

Comores- Préparation de la Conférence Internationale: « Oman et les relations avec les Etats de la Corne de l’Afrique »

Comores- Préparation de la Conférence Internationale: «  Oman et les relations avec les Etats de la Corne de l’Afrique » Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   Le colloque Une importante délégation omanaise, conduite par l’ambassadeur du Sultanat en Tanzanie, Ali bin Mohammed Mahrouqi,  s’est rendue à Moroni  aux Comores récemment. Reçue par le président de l’Union des Comores, Azali Assoumani, cette délégation a discuté de l’organisation  d’une conférence internationale sur Oman et ses relations avec les pays de la Corne de l’Afrique, prévue du 6 au 8 décembre 2016 ( dates à confirmer). 300 chercheurs et penseurs internationaux feront le déplacement aux Comores. Un documentaire sur les relations historiques ( aspects environnementaux, culturels) entre Oman et l’Afrique sera présenté durant cette conférence. Ce colloque international sera traduit en trois langues : français, anglais et arabe.  Un comité  scientifique établi pour la conférence a tenu une réunion au ministère des Affaires Etrangères afin d’identifier  tous  les thèmes de cet événement international ainsi que la logistique ( documents de travail…). Une autre réunion préparatoire est prévue au mois d’Octobre prochain. Oman et le développement Composé de onze gouvernorats, Mascate, Dhofar, Misandam, Buraymi, la Dakhliyah, et la Wusta (…), le Sultanat d’Oman est décrit comme un état moderne sous l’autorité du ministère de l’Intérieur, à l’exception des gouvernorats de Mascate et de Dhofar. Chaque gouvernorat se distingue par son administration, sa géographie et son économie. Le neuvième Plan quinquennal du Sultanat de 2016 à 2020 est axé sur une stratégie de diversification de l’économie. Objectif : Elargir la base productive d’Oman et créer des emplois pour les omanais en augmentant la contribution du PIB de secteurs comme l’agriculture, l’industrie, le tourisme, la pêche et les ressources minérales. Elément important du dispositif omanais : le développement des ressources humaines par l’éducation et la formation professionnelle. L’Aquaculture : la solution Pour inciter la production du secteur de la pêche et accroître sa valeur, le gouvernement omanais a mis en place depuis 2014, un programme d’aquaculture durable. A Doqm, une zone industrielle au sud de Mascate, le gouvernement omanais a crée l’autorité économique, Al Doqm en 2011. Doqm développe l’aquaculture pour diversifier son économie, avec l’aide de partenaires. Le Sultanat d’Oman bénéficie d’une surface  de 3 240 kilomètres de côtes pour l’exploitation des ressources halieutiques. Oman face aux changements climatiques En 2014, 2,2 millions de touristes ont visité Oman, avec 1,1 million de clients occupants des hôtels, soit une recette de plus de 191, millions de Rial Omanais. Conscient des répercussions environnementales du tourisme, le Sultanat a mis en place une série de mesure de prévention et de protection. A Mascate, le gouvernement a installé deux équipements de mesure des émissions polluantes...

Read More

En continuant à utiliser le site, vous acceptez l’utilisation des cookies. Plus d’informations

Les paramètres des cookies sur ce site sont définis sur « accepter les cookies » pour vous offrir la meilleure expérience de navigation possible. Si vous continuez à utiliser ce site sans changer vos paramètres de cookies ou si vous cliquez sur "Accepter" ci-dessous, vous consentez à cela.

Fermer