African Climate Talks II: Africa needs to act urgently
Avr11

African Climate Talks II: Africa needs to act urgently

African Climate Talks II: Africa needs to act urgently By Olumide Idowu* Participants attending the African Climate Talks II (ACT-II) in Addis Ababa ( Ethiopia) in March,  called Africa to change how it does business to reap the benefits of the Paris Agreement. Attending the two-day talks last month called “Market policy versus market mechanisms in the implementation of the Paris Agreement”, speakers asked for an urgent shift in how the continent will forge ahead to escape the consequences of climate change. Ambassador Lumumba Di-Aping, from South Sudan and former chair of the G77 called for strengthening of the current regime, noting that the current Paris Agreement is fundamentally flawed and inadequate. “The agreement will be the main basis for multilateral cooperation during the first period of commitments (2020-2030). The African Continent in this new architecture is tragically weaker than even before,” Di-Aping said. He urged Africa to reinvent itself consistently through science. “We must think “out of the box” to build the framework for a more effective effort from 2025 onwards – one consistent with Africa’s survival and prosperity,” he said. Dr James Murombedzi, the Officer in Charge of the Africa Climate Centre Policy (ACPC) noted that the continent needs to invest in strong evidence based African narrative. “This narrative should have a science, research and policy interface. We also should invest in informed societies that participate in the shaping of policies and strengthen capacities of countries,” Murombedzi said. “The temperatures are rising and Africa is suffering. Let us unite to save our continent. Let us develop sustainable ways of dealing with climate change,” Woldu said. Di-Aping noted that Africa must move beyond the old dichotomy of “mitigation and adaptation.” “We must look at each sector – agriculture, industry etc – and focus on integrating climate considerations into wider industrial and development planning in an integrated way. The climate regime must focus not just on “emissions reductions” but on the real solutions needed to achieve them,” Di-Aping said. He urged for negotiations which provide a space where these with problems, with solutions and with money, can meet as part of a structured process. “We need to make the UNFCCC more relevant to the real world.  The Africa Renewable Energy Initiative is to be commended as an important step in the energy sector – we need matching initiatives in each other sector,” he said. “Let us think about the financial sector and financial instruments and engineering. If we need a major plan to address 1.50C, the question arises how to fund it. Clearly the $10 billion in the GCF will not be enough; and developed countries have no intention...

Read More
Niger- Climat- Emplois verts: ” La jeunesse francophone ne doit pas être lésée” -Sani Ayouba-JVE
Avr10

Niger- Climat- Emplois verts: ” La jeunesse francophone ne doit pas être lésée” -Sani Ayouba-JVE

Niger- Climat- Emplois verts: ” La jeunesse francophone ne doit pas être lésée” -Sani Ayouba-JVE   La ville de Niamey au Niger a accueilli du 27 au 30 mars dernier   pour la seconde fois le forum  international francophone jeunesse et emplois verts. Objectif : préparer la jeunesse au marché des métiers sobres en carbone, une opportunité pour le Niger qui connait une forte croissance démographique. Sa population était estimée, d’après l’ONU,  à 17 millions d’habitants en 2013, et est classée 187ème sur 188 selon l’Indice de développement humain.  Autres défis : la dégradation de l’environnement et les changements climatiques,  l’insécurité alimentaire et nutritionnelle, l’insécurité globale dans le pays et l’impact des problèmes sécuritaires dans les autres pays voisins. Era Environnement vous propose d’écouter l’unn des jeunes acteurs principaux de la lutte contre les changements climatiques aux Niger, l’activiste Sani Ayouba, directeur exécutif de l’Organisation Non gouvernement Jeune Volontaire pour l’Environnement (JVE). Entretien. Propos recueillis par Houmi Ahamed Mikidache         Présentationforum LESALONDELEMPLOI       Lesmétierssuite       150J       JVE1       demain       lespartenaires              ...

Read More
COP 23: A fellowship programme launched for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries
Nov17

COP 23: A fellowship programme launched for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries

COP 23: A fellowship programme for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries   A new one year  Programme titled “Capacity Award Programme to Advance Capabilities and Institutional Training  (CAPACITY) will be implemented by the Government of Italy and UN Climate Change. Explanations. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache The  Government of Italy and UN Climate Change have signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to launch a new Fellowship Programme aimed at strengthening the institutional capacity of the Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) to respond to the challenges arising from climate change. How will it work? It will support innovative analytical work on climate change in the context of sustainable development, promote a network of experts who can bring creating and innovative options to bear on questions of climate change, encourage the leadership potential of young and promising professionals in the fields. For  Patricia Espinosa, UN Climate Change Executive Secretary, this programme “marks an important step forward in our endeavor to ensure widest possible support to SIDS and LDC countries to combat climate change and help them build institutional capacity to resilience to climate impacts.” The government of Italy will provide support to launch this fellowship programme, according to Mrs Espinosa. Italy has agreed to provide a funding of 2,500,000 euros for the fellowship programme, which will initially be launched for a period for five years. Adaptation to climate change  in developing countries is crucial to enable these countries to Pursure the common objectives of developed and developing countries for sustainable development in a climate-friendly manner, said Gian Luca Galletti, the Italian Minister of the Environment, Land and Sea.   Who can have access to this programme?   SIDS and LDC mid-career professionals who are working in a broad range of national, regional, and local governmental organizations, ranging from educational institutions, research institutes and ministries are the target of this programme. Italy has agreed to provide a funding of 2,500,000 euros for the fellowship programme, which will initially be launched for a period for five years.   Annually, up to five one year fellowships will be awarded that can be further extended by one year. Selected fellows will have the opportunity to gain exposure to a wide range of opportunities available the UN Climate Change Secretariat in Bonn, Germany. They will be able to work on projects relating to the Paris Agreement, including Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), global climate action agenda, finance, legal, regulatory and institutional framework....

Read More
COP 23: Commission Sahel- ” Nous partageons les mêmes défis”- Issifi Boureima
Nov16

COP 23: Commission Sahel- ” Nous partageons les mêmes défis”- Issifi Boureima

COP 23: Commission Sahel- ” Nous partageons les mêmes défis”- Issifi Boureima En marge des travaux de la 23ème Conférence des Nations Unies sur les Changements Climatiques, Issifi Boureima,  le conseiller technique du président du Niger en charge du Climat,  et président du groupe de travail conjoint des experts pour la Commission Climat pour la région du Sahel se confie à Era Environnement, dans un entretien fleuve, sur les enjeux de la Commission Sahel et ses solutions pour le développement de l’Afrique. Interview. Propos recueillis par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Era Environnement: La Commission Sahel a été annoncée en marge de la COP 23, un an après cette annonce, quelles sont les actions entreprises et quel bilan faîtes-vous de vos actions ? Issifi Boureima: La commission a été effectivement lancée en marge de la COP 22,  lors du Sommet de Haut Niveau organisé par le roi du Maroc. Pendant ce sommet une  décision importante a été prise: la création de trois commissions dont la Commission Sahel présidée par le Niger, la Commission du bassin du Congo, dirigée par la présidence de la République du Congo et la Commission des Petits Etats Insulaires en Développement dont la présidence est tenue par le Seychelles. Depuis la COP 22, la Commission Sahel  a mis en place une équipe d’experts autour du ministre de l’environnement de notre pays. Après cette action  nationale, un certain nombre de documents ont été préparés et  envoyés aux différents pays des trois Commissions.   Pour la Commission Sahel, notre premier travail consistait donc à à identifier les pays  membres de cette Commission. Sur le plan climatique, le sahel se définit par le principal indicateur qui est la isohyète (la courbe joignant les points recevant la même quantité de précipitations)   et  se caractérise par une pluviométrie allant de  150 millimètres  à 600 millimètres. Nous avons ainsi défini un espace allant de la Gambie à la corne de l’Afrique. La commission Sahel est composée par  17 pays dont l’Ethiopie, l’Erythrée, Djibouti et aussi  le Cap vert qui se retrouve également dans la Commission des Petits Etats Insulaires en Développement. Le Cap Vert est en fait le 18 ème pays.  Nous avons aussi intégré  le Cameroun : sa pointe nord est au Sahel et  il y  a certains défis que nous partageons avec ce pays notamment la sauvegarde du bassin du lac Tchad. Nous voulons  créer de bonnes conditions de travail à travers  la  synergie entre les trois commissions. Le Cap vert et le Cameroun sont les pays qui peuvent faire l’interface entre les différentes Commissions. La Commission Sahel est-elle donc opérationnelle ? Pour le moment, nous  sommes en phase de préparation. Nous avons préparé deux documents importants sous...

Read More
COP 23: Au fond de l’eau
Nov16

COP 23: Au fond de l’eau

COP 23: Au fond de l’eau   La conférence des Nations Unies sur les Changements  Climatiques présidée par les îles Fidji se poursuit. Les demandes restent les mêmes et sont discutées à travers le Dialogue  de Talanoa ( terme signifiant conversation) initié par les îles Fidji et organisé par des consultations informelles, alors que les chefs d’Etats et de gouvernement  s’expriment à Bonn. Résumé des travaux. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Ce que pensent  les îles Fidji Face au dialogue de Talanoa toujours en cours, les îles Fidji, premier Etat insulaire à présider la conférence des Nations Unies sur les Changements climatiques  reste positives. Mais, elles ont rappelé que  la question de la finance et le rôle du fonds d’adaptation font  l’objet de 12 articles à l’ordre du jour des  travaux de la mise en œuvre de l’Accord de Paris. «  Nous, en tant que présidence des Fidji, exprimons notre intérêt spécial de voir comment le fonds d’adaptation va servir l’Accord de Paris et des dialogues sont en cours sur le financement des 100 milliards de dollars par an ( à partir de 2020), a déclaré lors d’une conférence de presse Nazhat Shameem Khan, l’ambassadeur des Fidji auprès des Nations Unies. Le président de la COP 23, le premier ministre Frank Bainimarama,  à quant à lui souligné que  l’Allemagne a  annoncé, à l’ouverture de la COP,  un financement de 50 millions d’euros à destination du fonds d’adaptation pour les pays les moins avancés. Quel est la position de l’Union Européenne? Cette semaine, l’Union Européenne se donne trois objectifs à atteindre  : accomplir les progrès sur l’atténuation, centrés les points mandatés du programme de travail de l’Accord de Paris et maintenir l’équilibre imprimés à l’accord. Mais quelles ont été les demandes de la société civile? A l’ouverture des négociations sur le climat, la société civile, au nom d’un groupe d’ONGs,  Third World Network, s’est manifestée lors de plusieurs conférences de presse pour une prise en compte des actions pré-2020  dans le cadre du protocole de Kyoto mis en application il y a vingt ans mais non ratifié par de nombreux pays dont les Etats-Unis d’Amérique. « On ne peut parler des actions post-2020, sans traiter des actions pré-2020 » à déclaré Mohammed Ado, de Christian Aids. Mardi, le Réseau Climat et Développement, représenté par Aissatou Diouf a exprimé ses inquiétudes face au déséquilibre des contributions nationales africaines. « La plupart des pays africains ont mis l’accent sur l’atténuation dans leur Contribution Prévue Déterminée Nationale, le volet adaptation ne doit pas être occulté : Il y a des soucis sur le financement aussi bien pour le fonds d’adaptation que pour le fonds vert. Le WWF international, quant à...

Read More
COP 23: Climate Finance Insight- ICCG
Oct07

COP 23: Climate Finance Insight- ICCG

COP 23: Climate Finance Insight- ICCG Implementing NDCs in Africa is not so easy especially when countries need finance, technology data collection.  Ahead of COP 23, governments in Africa are waiting for a solution to accelerate this implementation. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Achieving the Paris Agreement goals is not easy, but it needs to bring together all the stakeholders said representatives of governments and institutions in a gathering last spring in Italy .  Representatives of governments and institutions have been interviewed  by Inititiative on Climate Change Policy and Governance, an institute based in Venice. One of their interviewees, was Pacifica  F. Achieng Ogola, Director, Climate Change, Ministry of Environment, Natural Resources & Regional Development of Kenya....

Read More

En continuant à utiliser le site, vous acceptez l’utilisation des cookies. Plus d’informations

Les paramètres des cookies sur ce site sont définis sur « accepter les cookies » pour vous offrir la meilleure expérience de navigation possible. Si vous continuez à utiliser ce site sans changer vos paramètres de cookies ou si vous cliquez sur "Accepter" ci-dessous, vous consentez à cela.

Fermer