Implementing climate policies by developed countries-SBI
Fév14

Implementing climate policies by developed countries-SBI

Implementing climate policies by developed countries-SBI  By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   18 developed countries will present their achievements in implementing climate policies next May in Bonn, during the forty-sixth session of the Subsidiary Body for Implementation ( SBI). According to the UNFCCC, the implementation updates involve an important preparatory stage, which includes an online question and answer period among Governments.  To this end, actions and inputs from all Parties are needed in the next few months and can be submitted via the ‘MA Portal’. Among the 18 countries that will present updates are the United States of America, France and the Russian Federation are (full list of countries can be found here)....

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Paris Agreement and the incoming US administration
Déc29

Paris Agreement and the incoming US administration

  Paris Agreement and the incoming US administration By Aya Kathir and Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache All around the world, people, politicians and leaders are talking about the “changing American political landscape”. Donald Trump the president elect has yet  to decide his environmental agenda regarding the climate change and the fossil fuel which could cripple a decade of climate diplomacy. Barack Obama’s Clean Power Strategy could fail after Donald Trump’s decision to remove the US from the Framework Convention on Climate Change and remove his Nation from the Paris Agreement. How Climate Change is affecting the US? There are public health threats associated with the extreme weather including the heat stress, air pollution and diseases carried by food, water and insects. Climate Change has come at a cost to the US. Disasters in 2012 cost the American Economy more than $100 billion with drought, heatwave, western wildfires, super storm Sandy and hurricane ISAAC. What is the Clean Power Plan about? The Clean Power Plan aims to  reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 32 percent from 2005 levels by 2030. It should prevent up to 3,600 premature deaths, 1,700 non-fatal heart attacks, 90,000 asthma attacks in children, 300,000 missed workdays and schooldays. According to the current US administration, the Clean Power Plan should boost the US economy by leading to 30 percent more renewable energy generation in  2030, creating tens of thousands of jobs and continuing to lower the costs of renewable energy. President Obama renewable energy policy calls to keep global warming below 2 degree Celsius. On August 3, 2015, Mr Obama announced “the clean power plan”,  a turning point and an important step in reducing carbon pollution. By announcing a clean power plan, the US is committed to lead global efforts to address Climate Change. The Clean Power Plan was first proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency in June 2014, under the administration of the President Obama. Its final version set a national limit on Carbon pollution.  US Investment From 2010-2015, the US has invested more than $11 billion in International clean energy finance, while in 2016,  Mr Trump as a candidate  announced that investing in  Climate Change wasn’t worth it:  it was waste of money he said. But on November 17, 2016, “more than 360 businesses and investors sent a strong message to the US headers; reaffirming their support for the historic Paris Climate Agreement. They were calling the US administration to strongly support the continuation of low-carbon policies and the commitment of the US in the Paris Agreement. Financing developing countries: a priority While the current US administration announced statistics and numbers to continue the global transition to zero- and-low...

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“Southern Africa could create 78,000 new jobs in less than 20 years”- Thelma Munhequete
Déc19

“Southern Africa could create 78,000 new jobs in less than 20 years”- Thelma Munhequete

Southern Africa could create 78,000 new jobs in less than 20 years By Thelma Munhequete*   I have attended the global Gender Climate Alliance Innovation Forum, on the sideline of COP22,  the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change held in Marrakech, Morocco last november. The event was supported by different UN Agencies, organizations and stakeholders. 200 participants from different countries attended the two days event. Different experience and action where shared. Mary Robinson from the Mary Robinson Foundation, addressed the need of bigger and great Dialogues among Women  globally, Regionally and at a country level. Participants  have concentrated efforts to   improve gender balance and increase the participation of women in all UNFCCC processes. The Forum addressed key questions:  Where  Are We?  Where  Are We Going? What topics? How  can we integrate gender into urban climate policy? These are my thoughts. Where Are We? Gender in the communities is a relatively new topic in Mozambique. But it  has not received much attention although it is acknowledged that women and the youth are the most vulnerable groups in the communities. In its response to ensure social safety and protection of the citizens, the Government of Mozambique introduced measures through departments. This is further supported by Policy Frameworks and Legal instruments. As Country Executive Director of Africa Foundation which works  in southern Africa Countries, both in Mozambique and Zambia,  I  shared my experience in Mozambique. The lack   of data  is the main obstacle to integrate climate change, gender mainstream and the sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) simultaneously, in order to reduce poverty, promote food security and further gender equality in my country. Climate change is affecting the youth. In most  cases, the youth helps the family. The decrease in water pressure reduces the reliability of the water borehole in the villages. During drought,people move with their livestock for grazing and so require water. These additional challenges compromise the health condition of the youth as well as the education. It is critical to assess the viability of scaling up successful local solutions as well as identifying new solutions for them. Where  Are We Going? The associated lack of food, water and income is already visible and it’s reaching social consequences such adoption of risky behaviours consuming of alcohol abuse, criminal activities (Poaching), theft and corruption that lead to family breakdowns. We have embraced the principles of gender equality and empowerment of women and youth . Through our affiliation to the Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA), we  aim to mainstream gender in all  projects. We adopted the Global Environment Facility’s Gender Equality Action Plan (GEAP) to guide our gender action plan which forms part...

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Amina J. Mohammed: Next UN Deputy Secretary General
Déc19

Amina J. Mohammed: Next UN Deputy Secretary General

Amina J. Mohammed: Next UN Deputy Secretary General By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Amina J. Mohammed, minister of environment of Nigeria has been appointed last week as  the next UN Deputy Secretary General by the incoming UN Secretary General, Antonio Guterres. She will take her new position on the 1st January 2017. The Nigerian minister was previously special adviser of three Nigerian President, on the Millenium Development Goals for six years. She was also Special Adviser to UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon on Post-2015 Development Planning. She is one the crucial contributors of the Sustainable Development Goals architecture. In a statement given to the Nigerian media, she emphasized her willing to continue to protect Nigeria Environment. She will follow the Nationnally Determined Contributions under the Paris Agreement, the first Sovereign Green Bounds in 2017, and the development of the Great Great Wall. “Over the last 3 decades and during my contribution to the Millennium Development Goals, the Sustainable Development Goals and recently working for environmental protection as part of President Buhari’s vision to transform Nigeria, I have been blessed with the unwavering support and inspiration from leaders, my colleagues, activists, and stakeholders from the polluted creeks in the Niger Delta, to the eroded (Kumaro and Alpha) and overflowing (Makoko) communities in Lagos, Nnaka erosion site in Anambra and others, through the polluted Sharada industrial sites of Kano, the drought affected areas(Bama) in Borno as well as the degraded dunes in Yobe and others parts of the catchment area of the disappearing Lake Chad, ” she declared. “I will continue to work fo the rights of the poor, especially women and the youth, ensuring we leave no one behind,” she added. Amina J Mohammed was Born in 1961, and educated in Nigeria and in the UK.  She  is married with six children.    ...

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Amina J.Mohammed: Prochaine Vice Secrétaire Générale de l’ONU
Déc19

Amina J.Mohammed: Prochaine Vice Secrétaire Générale de l’ONU

Amina J.Mohammed: Prochaine Vice Secrétaire Générale de l’ONU Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Le prochain Secrétaire Général de l’ONU, António Manuel de Oliveira Guterres a récemment   nommé  Amina J Mohammed, comme vice Secrétaire Générale des Nations Unies.  Actuelle ministre de l’environnement du Nigeria, Mme Mohammed  prendra ses fonctions le 1er Janvier 2017. La ministre nigériane  a été précédemment  conseillère spéciale  de trois présidents du Nigeria, sur la question  des Objectifs du Millénaire pour le Développement  pendant six ans. C’est aussi l’une des architectes des Objectifs du Développement Durable. Dans une déclaration  remise à la presse nigériane la semaine dernière, Mme Mohammed  a réaffirmé son engagement pour la protection de l’environnement de son pays. Elle continuera  notamment à suivre de près les actions liées au  plan d’action national du Nigeria ( présenté lors de la COP 21), la première émission verte prévue en 2017, et  le développement de la grande muraille verte. «  Durant les 30 dernières années, et pendant ma contribution aux objectifs du Millénaire pour le Développement, puis aux objectifs du développement durable, ainsi que mon travaille récent de protection de l’environnement au Nigeria liée à la vision de transformation du pays par le président Buhari, j’ai bénéficié de l’appui indéfectible  et d’inspiration venant de leaders, de mes collègues, d’activistes, » a-t-elle expliqué. Et d’ajouter : «  Je continuerai à travailler pour les droits des pauvres, spécialement les femmes et les jeunes, en m’assurant de ne laisser personne derrière. » Amina J Mohammed est née en  1961, a étudié au  Nigeria ainsi qu’ au Royaume Uni.  Mme Mohammed est  mariée et mère de six enfants....

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Crowding the private sector into Africa’s climate action
Déc12

Crowding the private sector into Africa’s climate action

Crowding the private sector into Africa’s climate action It is in the enlightened self-interest of African private sector to begin to mobilise investment capital for Africa’s climate action LAGOS, Nigeria, December 12, 2016/ — The global community for climate action was spooked by the November 8 election of Donald Trump as the next President of the United States. The US President-elect had earned the sobriquet of “climate denier,” for his claim that climate change is a hoax. However, there is cautious optimism that his presidency will not overturn the global agenda on climate change. Hopefully, his views on climate change will change and align with reality when he settles into the Oval Office. Policymakers also believe that global climate agreements cannot be reversed easily. In the meantime, stakeholders are pressing on with formulating strategies for climate change mitigation and adaptation. The 22nd session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 22) to the United Nations’ agency on climate change held on November 7 – 18 in Marrakech, Morocco. At the climate talks, Australia, Japan, United Kingdom, Pakistan and seven other countries ratified the December 2015 Paris Climate Agreement. A total of 111 countries, including the United States, China and Member Countries of the European Union ratified the agreement by the time COP 22 concluded. Since the Paris accord entered into force on November 4th, quite earlier than anticipated, global action against climate change has effectively shifted to strategic programming. Therefore, in Marrakech, Canada, Germany, Mexico and the United States published their plans to significantly decarbonize their economies by 2050. A group of 47 developing nations also committed to running entirely on renewable energy sources “as rapidly as possible.” Some of the plans are already gaining traction. Investments in renewable energy totalled $286 billion in 2015. This surpassed by 3% the previous high of renewable energy investment achieved in 2011. Data gleaned from Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment 2016, a joint publication by United Nations Environment Programme and Bloomberg, further revealed that last year, coal and gas-fired electricity generation drew less than half the record investment made in solar, wind and other renewable energy sources. The trend in renewable energy investment is a mixed bag, even in developing countries. China alone accounted for 55% of total investment last year; Africa’s share was less than 5%. As climate change mitigation is being driven by investment in green energy, Africa is already taking the familiar position at the back seat on the ‘green energy train’. This was not unanticipated by climate policymakers. Although China is the clear leader in investment in renewables, other developing countries, in particular the low-income countries, are...

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