Appel à film pour la sixième édition du Festival Deauville Green Awards
Mar31

Appel à film pour la sixième édition du Festival Deauville Green Awards

Appel à film pour la sixième édition du Festival Deauville Green Awards Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Les entreprises, institutions, ONG et collectivités luttant contre les changements climatiques ont jusqu’au 28 avril pour participer au festival Deauville Green Awards. Créé il y a six ans, le festival Deauville Green Awards  a pour objectif de valoriser les films institutionnels, spots et documentaires autour du développement durable et des éco-innovations. Présenté comme la fenêtre mondiale sur l’environnement, la communication et le développement durable, le  Deauville Green Awards proposera de nombreuses projections spéciales et actions à destination des festivaliers et du grand public. Une opportunité pour tous les acteurs de l’audiovisuel, de la communication et  du développement durable et de la RSE de toute l’Europe et du monde de se retrouver. Au programme, trois compétitions : Spots de deux minutes ( Messages courts de sensibilisation), Info de 25 minutes ( Films d’information, médias audiovisuels des collectivités, entreprises, ONGS), Docu ( Documentaires, Programmes TV, Webdocs). Quatorze catégories avec comme thèmes principaux les grands enjeux environnementaux ( lutte et adaptation au changement climatique, préservation de la biodiversité), les domaines d’application écologique ( la transition énergétique, agriculture et sylviculture durables, habitat, bâtiment, urbanisme, transport, éco-mobilité…), les questions de société ( Santé et cadre de vie, Handicap, diversité, solidarité, transition démographique…). Le 29 juin 2017, lors de la cérémonie de remise des prix, le jury de professionnels  décernera les Totem d’or et d’argent aux meilleures productions de chaque catégorie et section.     Teaser des Deauville Green Awards 2017 from Deauville Green Awards on Vimeo....

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Climate and Development Agendas Are Inherently Linked
Mar26

Climate and Development Agendas Are Inherently Linked

Speaking at the opening of the President of the General Assembly High-Level Event Climate Change and the Sustainable Development Agenda in New York on 23 March, UNFCCC Executive Secretary Patricia Espinosa said that the sustainable development and climate change agendas are inherently linked. “By looking at climate and sustainability holistically, we maximize the potential for positive outcomes of every action we take. And when international commitments are turned into country-level action, tangible benefits are delivered to communities and the people who live there,” she said. Here is her full address: H.E. Mr. Peter Thomson, President of the United Nations General Assembly, H.E. Mr. António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations, Excellencies, Distinguished guests, Ladies and gentlemen, Let me first recognize the President of the General Assembly and the Government of Fiji for your climate leadership. Today’s special event is the latest in a long list that is your lasting legacy of leadership on this critical issue. Thank you for shining a light on vulnerability through your work in the Pacific Islands Forum and Climate Vulnerable Forum. Thank you for your bold Paris Agreement contribution of 100 per cent renewable power by 2030. Thank you for being the first to ratify the Paris Agreement. And thank you for your excellent partnership as COP 23 President in preparation of this year’s UN climate change conference. I must also express my sincere gratitude to the Secretary-General for making the connection between climate change and the sustainable development agenda and calling for an integrated approach to our challenges. Your vision of preventing future risk through stronger institutions, more resilient societies and bold action must guide every nation forward through the sometimes turbulent waters of transformative change. How far is the Paris Agreement ? One hundred and thirty-seven Member States are working towards that vision by ratifying the Paris Climate Change Agreement. This is both a crucial step towards concerted action on climate change and a step towards truly sustainable development. As the international community takes these important initial steps in this new era of implementation, we must do so with the full knowledge that the sustainable development agenda and climate change agenda are inherently linked. These challenges must be addressed in an integrated manner because there is only one on-the-ground reality. By looking at climate and sustainability holistically, we maximize the potential for positive outcomes of every action we take. And when international commitments are turned into country-level action, tangible benefits are delivered to communities and the people who live there. Implementation is the policy that meets these commitments. And we must move quickly to put this policy in place. We must bend...

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Implementing climate policies by developed countries-SBI
Fév14

Implementing climate policies by developed countries-SBI

Implementing climate policies by developed countries-SBI  By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   18 developed countries will present their achievements in implementing climate policies next May in Bonn, during the forty-sixth session of the Subsidiary Body for Implementation ( SBI). According to the UNFCCC, the implementation updates involve an important preparatory stage, which includes an online question and answer period among Governments.  To this end, actions and inputs from all Parties are needed in the next few months and can be submitted via the ‘MA Portal’. Among the 18 countries that will present updates are the United States of America, France and the Russian Federation are (full list of countries can be found here)....

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Paris Agreement and the incoming US administration
Déc29

Paris Agreement and the incoming US administration

  Paris Agreement and the incoming US administration By Aya Kathir and Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache All around the world, people, politicians and leaders are talking about the “changing American political landscape”. Donald Trump the president elect has yet  to decide his environmental agenda regarding the climate change and the fossil fuel which could cripple a decade of climate diplomacy. Barack Obama’s Clean Power Strategy could fail after Donald Trump’s decision to remove the US from the Framework Convention on Climate Change and remove his Nation from the Paris Agreement. How Climate Change is affecting the US? There are public health threats associated with the extreme weather including the heat stress, air pollution and diseases carried by food, water and insects. Climate Change has come at a cost to the US. Disasters in 2012 cost the American Economy more than $100 billion with drought, heatwave, western wildfires, super storm Sandy and hurricane ISAAC. What is the Clean Power Plan about? The Clean Power Plan aims to  reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 32 percent from 2005 levels by 2030. It should prevent up to 3,600 premature deaths, 1,700 non-fatal heart attacks, 90,000 asthma attacks in children, 300,000 missed workdays and schooldays. According to the current US administration, the Clean Power Plan should boost the US economy by leading to 30 percent more renewable energy generation in  2030, creating tens of thousands of jobs and continuing to lower the costs of renewable energy. President Obama renewable energy policy calls to keep global warming below 2 degree Celsius. On August 3, 2015, Mr Obama announced “the clean power plan”,  a turning point and an important step in reducing carbon pollution. By announcing a clean power plan, the US is committed to lead global efforts to address Climate Change. The Clean Power Plan was first proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency in June 2014, under the administration of the President Obama. Its final version set a national limit on Carbon pollution.  US Investment From 2010-2015, the US has invested more than $11 billion in International clean energy finance, while in 2016,  Mr Trump as a candidate  announced that investing in  Climate Change wasn’t worth it:  it was waste of money he said. But on November 17, 2016, “more than 360 businesses and investors sent a strong message to the US headers; reaffirming their support for the historic Paris Climate Agreement. They were calling the US administration to strongly support the continuation of low-carbon policies and the commitment of the US in the Paris Agreement. Financing developing countries: a priority While the current US administration announced statistics and numbers to continue the global transition to zero- and-low...

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“Southern Africa could create 78,000 new jobs in less than 20 years”- Thelma Munhequete
Déc19

“Southern Africa could create 78,000 new jobs in less than 20 years”- Thelma Munhequete

Southern Africa could create 78,000 new jobs in less than 20 years By Thelma Munhequete*   I have attended the global Gender Climate Alliance Innovation Forum, on the sideline of COP22,  the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change held in Marrakech, Morocco last november. The event was supported by different UN Agencies, organizations and stakeholders. 200 participants from different countries attended the two days event. Different experience and action where shared. Mary Robinson from the Mary Robinson Foundation, addressed the need of bigger and great Dialogues among Women  globally, Regionally and at a country level. Participants  have concentrated efforts to   improve gender balance and increase the participation of women in all UNFCCC processes. The Forum addressed key questions:  Where  Are We?  Where  Are We Going? What topics? How  can we integrate gender into urban climate policy? These are my thoughts. Where Are We? Gender in the communities is a relatively new topic in Mozambique. But it  has not received much attention although it is acknowledged that women and the youth are the most vulnerable groups in the communities. In its response to ensure social safety and protection of the citizens, the Government of Mozambique introduced measures through departments. This is further supported by Policy Frameworks and Legal instruments. As Country Executive Director of Africa Foundation which works  in southern Africa Countries, both in Mozambique and Zambia,  I  shared my experience in Mozambique. The lack   of data  is the main obstacle to integrate climate change, gender mainstream and the sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) simultaneously, in order to reduce poverty, promote food security and further gender equality in my country. Climate change is affecting the youth. In most  cases, the youth helps the family. The decrease in water pressure reduces the reliability of the water borehole in the villages. During drought,people move with their livestock for grazing and so require water. These additional challenges compromise the health condition of the youth as well as the education. It is critical to assess the viability of scaling up successful local solutions as well as identifying new solutions for them. Where  Are We Going? The associated lack of food, water and income is already visible and it’s reaching social consequences such adoption of risky behaviours consuming of alcohol abuse, criminal activities (Poaching), theft and corruption that lead to family breakdowns. We have embraced the principles of gender equality and empowerment of women and youth . Through our affiliation to the Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA), we  aim to mainstream gender in all  projects. We adopted the Global Environment Facility’s Gender Equality Action Plan (GEAP) to guide our gender action plan which forms part...

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Amina J. Mohammed: Next UN Deputy Secretary General
Déc19

Amina J. Mohammed: Next UN Deputy Secretary General

Amina J. Mohammed: Next UN Deputy Secretary General By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Amina J. Mohammed, minister of environment of Nigeria has been appointed last week as  the next UN Deputy Secretary General by the incoming UN Secretary General, Antonio Guterres. She will take her new position on the 1st January 2017. The Nigerian minister was previously special adviser of three Nigerian President, on the Millenium Development Goals for six years. She was also Special Adviser to UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon on Post-2015 Development Planning. She is one the crucial contributors of the Sustainable Development Goals architecture. In a statement given to the Nigerian media, she emphasized her willing to continue to protect Nigeria Environment. She will follow the Nationnally Determined Contributions under the Paris Agreement, the first Sovereign Green Bounds in 2017, and the development of the Great Great Wall. “Over the last 3 decades and during my contribution to the Millennium Development Goals, the Sustainable Development Goals and recently working for environmental protection as part of President Buhari’s vision to transform Nigeria, I have been blessed with the unwavering support and inspiration from leaders, my colleagues, activists, and stakeholders from the polluted creeks in the Niger Delta, to the eroded (Kumaro and Alpha) and overflowing (Makoko) communities in Lagos, Nnaka erosion site in Anambra and others, through the polluted Sharada industrial sites of Kano, the drought affected areas(Bama) in Borno as well as the degraded dunes in Yobe and others parts of the catchment area of the disappearing Lake Chad, ” she declared. “I will continue to work fo the rights of the poor, especially women and the youth, ensuring we leave no one behind,” she added. Amina J Mohammed was Born in 1961, and educated in Nigeria and in the UK.  She  is married with six children.    ...

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