Dr Richard Munang: “With EBAFOSA, everyone can be engaged in Africa”
Août15

Dr Richard Munang: “With EBAFOSA, everyone can be engaged in Africa”

Dr Richard Munang: “With EBAFOSA,everyone can be engaged in Africa” Currently the Africa Regional Climate Change Programme Coordinator of the UN Environment, Dr Richard Munang helps drive countries to implement the Paris Agreement and helping young people finding opportunities in green jobs. Presentation. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Dr Richard Munang is the Africa Regional Climate Change Programme Coordinator of the UN Environment for 8 years. He holds a PhD in Environmental Change and Policy from the University of Nottingham, in the United Kingdom. He also holds an Executive Certificate in Climate Change and Energy Policy Making from Harvard Kennedy School of Government, in the United States of America. In 2016, he received the prestigious African Environmental Hero award conferred by the International Environmental Roundtable for Africa for his leadership on environmental policies across the continent. His assignments “My main role is to help drive UNEP strategies on climate change in Africa, mostly in helping countries to implement the Paris Agreement, from the perspective of seeing climate action as social economic opportunity to address aspect on food security, create jobs and other opportunities as well as offsetting carbon and contributing to the resilience of ecosystem,”Dr Munang said recently. He is indeed coordinating the implementation of diverse projects in key economic sectors especially in agriculture, and in energy. From 2009 to 2012, he worked on coordinating a program called “climate change adaptation and development in Africa”. This project involved 11 countries.  Ghana, Togo, Senegal, Benin, Seychelles, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Rwanda were part of this project. “We have learned that there is no absence of action across the continent, but what has been the problem is that these actions are often isolated and not be brought together,” he explained. Dr. Munang launched  the first Africa Adaptation Gap Report which has helped to galvanize a coherent continental strategic climate policy position. Change the attitudes with EBAFOSA He is currently working on showing examples of adaptation projects in Africa, through the framework Ecosystem Based Adaptation for Food Security in Africa Assembly: EBAFOSA. In 2015, indeed, the UN environment in collaboration with the African Union Commission and other partners created EBAFOSA. Today,  Dr Munang  mentors African youth: he gives them knowledge to solve Africa’s environmental and development challenges. He is working with 44 countries. “With EBAFOSA,everyone can be engaged in Africa: it is also an opportunity for young people, to develop mobile application in the agriculture value chain for instance,” he explained. For Dr Munang, Combining  Agriculture with Information Communication Technology (ICT) is the key for Africa Sustainable Development. After years of advocacy on adaptation to climate change in Africa, he  thinks that  institutions of higher...

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Africa: Practising sustainable development with youth
Juil30

Africa: Practising sustainable development with youth

Africa: Practising sustainable development with youth   The African youth wants to take advantage to the ongoing  sustainable development opportunities in the continent. Introduction.   By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache 07-30-2017   Recently, the African youth elected the Interim Executive Board members of the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme CAADP) Youth Network in Uganda. The Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme is an  African Union’s policy framework for agricultural transformation, food security and nutrition, economic growth launched in 2003.   The Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme youth network is a youth ( 18 to 35) platform for farmers, Agroentrepreneurs, Nutritionists, and Agricultural practitioners. Their Goal: Create one million jobs for youth in the Agriculture Value Chain by 2025 and supported Agroentrepreneurs by 2020. Their Focus Areas: Agribusiness, Food Security and Nutrition, Climate Smart Agriculture, Green and Blue Economy. The official launched of this youth network is expected to be held in Dakar ( Sénégal) in September 2017.   What has been done so far?   In October  2016, two African organizations,  the African Youth Initiative on Climate Change (AYICC) and  the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme CAADP Youth Network supported the publication of a book which aims  to establish and promote at least 10,000 youth-led farms and agribusinesses across Africa by 2020. This publication named as “Youth Eco-Smart Projects” was developed by   Fresh & Young Brains Development Initiative. Fresh & Young Brains Development Initiative is a Nigerian youth Non Governmental Organization and the founder is a young Nigerian lawyer, Nkiruka Nnaemego. She is also an agroentrepreneur and development practitioner. Nkiruka and her colleagues from Africa (Ibraheem Ceesay from the Gambia, Mariam Allam from Egypt…) are engaging and  integrating  African youth in the implementation of the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and  Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) processes.   NDCs: “The heart of the Paris Agreement” Hakima El Haite   About the Youth Eco-Smart Projects book   The book has been launched during the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Conference of Parties (COP22) in Morocco   November 10, 2016,  at the Youth Side Event on “ Integrating Youth in the Implementation of the Nationally Determined Contributions  (NDCs) across Africa. This event was indeed  organized by the African Youth Initiative on Climate Change ( AYICC), an African Union initiative launched in 2006 with the aim of mobilizing young people to have one voice on the issues of climate change. The book intends to promote selected youth-led ecologically smart projects and initiatives. It encourages African Governments and Partners to support the selected projects. It finally advocates for more financial support to ensure active youth engagement in sustainable agriculture.   Some Excepts from the...

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Comores- Développement Economique: Les îles  vont intégrer la SADC
Juil22

Comores- Développement Economique: Les îles  vont intégrer la SADC

Comores- Développement Economique: Les îles  vont intégrer la SADC La Communauté de Développement d’Afrique Australe* vient d’accepter la demande d’intégration des Comores au sein de son institution. Au mois d’août prochain, cette demande sera officiellement approuvée, lors du Sommet des Chefs d’Etat à Prétoria en Afrique du Sud. Cette entrée dans le développement économique de l’Afrique Australe est perçue comme une réelle opportunité. Analyse.   Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   La Communauté de développement d’Afrique Australe ( en anglais Southern African Development Community)  vient d’accepter la demande des Comores d’entrée dans l’organisation. Au mois d’août prochain, cette demande sera officiellement acceptée lors du Sommet des Chefs d’Etat à Prétoria en Afrique du Sud. Que signifie cette intégration ? Les programmes et projets liés à la protection de l’environnement et au développement  font partie des priorités de la SADC et les Comores peuvent intégrer leur stratégie de développement durable notamment la promotion de la pêche durable, et l’utilisation des énergies renouvelables, mais aussi le développement d’une agriculture plus saine. L’économie bleue : un enjeu considérable D’après le manuel sur l’économie bleue, publié l’an dernier  par la Commission Economique des Nations Unies pour l’Afrique (CEA), il est nécessaire d’impliquer les femmes dans le développement de l’économie bleue. Les Comores, dont la jeune population est composée plus de 50% par les femmes ont la possibilité à travers l’intégration dans la SADC de rebondir sur les recommandations et actions  de  la première conférence continentale sur l’emploi des femmes africaines organisée à Luanda (Angola) en 2015. En effet, depuis cette conférence, l’Union Africaine a établi l’Agenda 2063 qui appelle à renforcer la formation technique et professionnelle ainsi que la formation continue des femmes. L’accès à la connaissance sur l’économie bleue doit passer par l’école maternelle, primaire et secondaire, précise l’agenda 2063. Le développement de l’économie bleue peut aussi permettre aux Comores et à d’autres pays d’Afrique de renforcer des partenariats. D’après le rapport sur l’économie bleue publié par la CEA, les partenariats peuvent favoriser le développement économique des pays impliqués et peuvent aussi aider ces pays à « combler leur lacunes financières et techniques ou l’insuffisance des infrastructures , qui les empêchent d’exploiter pleinement le potentiel de leurs ressources aquatiques ou marines. »   L’économie bleue peut aussi encourager les Etats à résoudre leur contentieux devant les tribunaux.  La CEA cite dans son rapport le cas de Maurice et des Seychelles. En 2008, ces deux états insulaires ont saisi en commun la Commission des limites du plateau continental du dossier des Mascareignes, un plateau d’environ 396 000 km2, situé à l’est de Madagascar. En 2012, les deux pays conclurent un accord de gestion conjointe pour exploiter ensemble les ressources marines , pêche,...

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COP 23- Tonga hosts Pacific meeting on GCF funds
Juil18

COP 23- Tonga hosts Pacific meeting on GCF funds

COP 23- Tonga hosts Pacific meeting on GCF funds 07-18-2017 The Kingdom of Tonga hosts the Green Climate Fund’s Structured Dialogue with the Pacific during four days. This meeting is  organized in collaboration with the Governments of  Australia. It aims to accelerate the implementation of GCF projects and programmes approuved in the Pacific. The meeting has been  launched by the Deputy Prime Minister of Tonga and Minister of MEIDECC, Honourable Siaosi Sovaleni on July 18 at the Faónelua Convention Centre.  The dialogue will open with a High-Level Segment at Faónelua followed by a three-day Technical workshop at Tanoá International Hotel. GCF  Board Members, Secretariat Staff,  ministers of countries in the Pacific, senior government officials, including representatives of the GCF National Designated Entities and Focal points, private sector representatives and civil society organizations  are attending the meeting. The four- day gathering is an opportunity for countries and Accredites Entities to share their experiences in various programmes fund by the GCF. According to the GCF Communication department, the dialogue is expected to help Pacific Island countries identify Accredited Entities and private sector organisations to partner with. It will help identify Accredited Entities, including private sector partners to support the project proposals to fight climate change. This dialogue is  part of the sustained development of a Regional Roadmap initiated in 2016 GCF Regional Meeting which has to help strengthen Pacific Island countries engagement with the...

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Africa Energy Access and jobs: “there is  hope for youth”- Lawrence Mashungu
Juil09

Africa Energy Access and jobs: “there is hope for youth”- Lawrence Mashungu

  Africa Energy Access and jobs: “there is  hope for youth”- Lawrence Mashungu   The last G20 meeting in Hamburg, in Germany, emphasized the importance of the Africa Partnership launched recently in Berlin, in recognition of the opportunities and challenges in African countries through the creation of jobs for youth and the access to energy in the continent for instance. 39 years old Lawrence Mashungu  previously worked with Youth Agenda Trust, a youth organization, where he was working as a project coordinator. He has vast experience in youth and community engagement.  He is now in charge of the renewable energy access plan in his country. Interview.     Eraenvironnement.com : In 2015, you were part of the youth who organized the African Youth Conference on Climate Change in Victoria’s fall, in Zimbabwe. What are you doing right now? Lawrence Mashungu: I am a Renewable Energy expert working  in the Ministry of Environment, Water and Climate as a Climate Change Mitigation Expert. I am responsible for Implementation of mitigation actions related to Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency. How do you see the youth with Climate Change opportunities in your country? The youth in Zimbabwe have a role to play in Climate Change Mitigation and adaptation in the country and there are a lot of opportunities for them to participate. The National Climate Change Response Strategy of 2014 provides for the youth to take part in climate change programmes both in policy formulation and actual project implementation.  I must say also that before COP 21, the Youth  in my country had the opportunities to participate in the National Committee on Nationally Determined Contributions that was established by government to ensure speed implementation of the NDC for the country.   How do you position yourself in these opportunities in energy for instance? I am tasked to work directly on energy and also with youth on these issues. Currently the youth under the banner of an organisation called Action 24 Zimbabwe with support from HIVOS, an netherland organization for development, which is implementing a project focusing on promoting renewable energy and also implementation of the NDC in our country. I am working with them closely to ensure success of the project.   Do you think that it is difficult to take these opportunities to be for instance entrepreneurs in all the priorities sectors, water, water management, agriculture, energy…? Currently the youth face a number of challenges to take up these opportunities mainly because of lack of funding. I am of the view that there is also a urgent need  to invest in capacity building targeting the youth so that they will be able to...

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COP 23-Column: Addressing Youth Radicalization and Extremism beyond Hunger and Unemployment
Juil04

COP 23-Column: Addressing Youth Radicalization and Extremism beyond Hunger and Unemployment

COP 23-Column: Addressing Youth Radicalization and Extremism beyond Hunger and Unemployment By Tabi Joda* The mantra One of the most turbulent distractions to mainstream global issues is perhaps, youth radicalization and extremism. The deleterious effects of climate change and natural disasters have increased unsustainable socioeconomic practices. Unfortunately, global and local actors seem to misunderstand the potential and actual motivations surrounding this emerging phenomenon. The mantra of hunger and unemployment is dominating local and international debates on the question. But there is apparently more to the question of radicalization and extremism, in relation to hunger and youths unemployment, than it reaches mainstream understanding.   There is global awe about a suddenly obvious proliferation of youth subscription into insurgent activities often propelled by extremist ideologies. That is a known fact. Vis-à-vis present demographic transitions, there is an ever rising trend of misguided population movements from rural peripheries into urban metropolis leading to alarmingly loud concentration of desperate youths in city centres especially in Africa. To that effect, it is ever more imperative to identify the vulnerabilities upon which youth radicalization and extremism lies. The complications get even worse when we try to answer the question why youths are increasingly being agents of destruction instead of being productive members of their communities.   Different narratives These trends have provoked several narratives from different development angels. But whether these narratives exist in cluster or not, the question at stake is as we feel the impacts of Boko haram insurgents in North East Nigeria and Far North of Cameroon, Alshabaab insurgents in almost all of Somalia including Kenya and beyond, and the Tuareg insurgent groups in Mali who are just about to completely retreat into the deserts, are these narratives based on old thinking or do they offer new thinking, new forms of measurement and research into the root causes of why youths are increasingly being radicalized and mobilized into extreme groups.   Much has been argued about tackling the unemployment crises that is keeping many youth idle and leaving them vulnerable as destructive agents rather than constructive ones. Other arguments have emerged about the question of alleviating youth poverty as a critical step to mitigating exposure of youths to radicalization through extremist groups. These assumptions are good, but it remains to be seen if the discussion will in fact lead to more research and a greater focus on evidence-based approaches tackling the root causes of the issues. “Development efforts have often been driven by assumptions and not evidence,” said Keith Proctor, a senior policy researcher at Mercy Corps. In a summit held a few years ago at the White House about countering violent extremism, the...

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