Meteorology: Solution to Climate Change
Août16

Meteorology: Solution to Climate Change

Meteorology : Solution to Climate Change By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Two professional days dedicated to world meteorology took place in Paris under the authority of the French Ministry of  Environment, from May 29th to May 30th . The two days aimed to explain how the world respond to climate change. It is also an opportunity to understand climate data. Egypt Case, back to COP 21. Ashrafi Zaki, a meterologist from  the Egyptian climate authority who was part of the Egyptian Delegation during  the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris  explained in an interview how his country is working to raise awareness on climate change and agriculture. Egypt authorities promote climate information through  a strategy:  a training workshop available for journalists. Journalists  are trained  on how to  understand the weather forecast. Egypt meteorology authority  integrates the youth in a programme known as the  “Cairo Action talk”. For Mr Zaki, around 120 young people are part of this programme based on tourism,  health and the impact of climate change. Listen to the interview. Ashrafi...

Read More
COP22- Paris agreement and Human Rights
Août10

COP22- Paris agreement and Human Rights

COP 22-Paris agreement and Human Rights   After the Kyoto Protocol which was not respected by most of the countries, Paris Agreement should be the world’s biggest upswing in Climate change policy. But will it be easy for Human Rights to be at the forefront of the talks in Marrakesh?   By Aya Kathir   The Agreement Paris agreement is a critical turning point toward a zero-carbon and resilient world according to the French presidency of the COP 21, the  UN Climate Change  summit held last December in Paris . The next UN Climate Change conference will be a space of  action, said the Morrocan presidency. After the Kyoto Protocol which was not respected by most of the countries, Paris Agreement should be the world’s biggest upswing in Climate change policy. This agreement was adopted in Paris during the  21 UN Conference on climate change. On 22 April 2016, the text was opened for signature. It was during the Earth Day in New York city. Early August 2016, 180 members of the United Nations Framework Convention on climate Change (UNFCCC) have signed it.  Now,  around 23 States have  deposited their instruments of ratification, acceptance or approval accounting in total for 1.08 % of the total global greenhouse gas emissions, describes  the UNFCCC website. So, it is only representing  around 1.08 % of the total global greenhouse gas emissions. It’s not a working base. But certainly, Paris Agreement was  a “historic turning point” as it was mentioned by Laurent Fabius, the Head of Paris Conference and France’s foreign minister. This agreement aims to reduce the global warming by controlling the Co2 emissions and diminishes greenhouse gas, as it was described in details in Article 2 of the UN Climate Change Convention. It sets ambitious goal: ” to increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°c pre- industrial levels”.   Criticism The agreement  was praised by the French President François Hollande , with the UN secretary general Ban Ki – Moon, and the Climate Change UN Executive  Secretary at  that time, Christina Figueres. Although,  it was surrounded by criticism. “The agreement is all about “promises” and we don’t see its impact in real life”, said James Hansen, a former NASA scientist and Climate change expert. Specially after the limited participation in the Kyoto Protocol and the lack of agreement in Copenhagen in 2009. But   the Kyoto Protocol did not include a single reference to  the rights of indigenous people and ecosystem integrity. As opposed to the Kyoto Protocol, Human Rights  are include in the Paris Agreement,  not in the body of the text, but it is  included  in the...

Read More
26th AU Summit: Seeking for women rights in 21st century
Juil23

26th AU Summit: Seeking for women rights in 21st century

26th AU Summit: Seeking for women rights in 21st century By Aya Kathir Women in general  around the world are seeking for their rights . Women especially  in Egypt are facing many challenges. Despite all of these, they are trying to be fully engaged in the public life and many of them succeeded already to grave their names in many fields. Analysis.     Women’s battle   Throughout ages, History has been the witness of many women around the world who have been trying to break the rules in societies that were been controlled by men. They were seeking to prove themselves, by raising their voices and by seeking to reach their rights in playing a role in the community. According to Egypt’s vision 2030, women can be empowering socially, politically and economically. But women in Egypt are facing many challenges. Women are facing obviously an unprecedented phenomena of sexual harassment. According to 2013 UN Women report, nearly 99.3% of women have been sexually harassed. This problem has nothing to do with clothing, but it’s a stolen right of practicing their freedom. Just the fact of being a woman in a patriarchal society opens the door to be underestimated and neglected.   The United Nations in Egypt and the Egyptian government are combining their efforts to ensure the women’s freedom and safety by supporting the legislative changes and executing the laws which are considered as first steps to face this epidemic. The UNICEF reported that 91% of women and girls had undergone female genital mutilation, which has been criminalized in Egypt in 2008. It’s the evidence of the significant increase in the women’s health care in the last centuries. Women are facing sex segregation in the work place, which limits their ability to work and to maintain a higher position. There is also a   gender segregation at school , especially in Upper- class with the  withdrawal of girls from attending school when they reached the puberty. Many civil societies are facing the high illiteracy rates among women. Many organizations and feminism groups are  protecting women’s right, with the  gender equality  willing.  One of them is  the Egyptian Center for women’s rights (ECWR), for instance. Headed by Nihad Abu Al Qumsan, this  non-governmental, non-profit organization has the mission to bring equality among men and women. Another one is the Convention on the elimination of all forms of discrimination against women (CEDAW). It  was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on December 18, 1979. This convention seeks to define discrimination against women as a human right issue.  189 countries have signed this convention. Gamal Abdul Nasser’s legacy The president Gamal...

Read More
COP 22- Egypte : L’ère  du charbon
Juin10

COP 22- Egypte : L’ère du charbon

COP 22-Egypte : L’ère du charbon Par Aya Kathir Face à la chute des prix du gaz et du pétrole, l’Egypte a finalement opté pour l’utilisation du charbon comme alternative au gaz naturel. Après plusieurs mois de polémiques, le gouvernement égyptien a cédé à la tentation. Analyse Tout avait pourtant bien commencé. Mars 2015. Charm El Cheikh. L’Egypte organise une conférence internationale sur le développement du pays. Pendant trois jours. Plus de 2000 personnes assistent au sommet. Objectif : encourager les investisseurs à réaliser des projets dans ce pays, il y a peu, connu pour son tourisme florissant. Mais le contexte n’est pas facile : tribulations politiques, terrorisme…Sous le Haut patronage du président égyptien Abdel Fatah Al Sissi, cette conférence fait l’objet de présentations d’importants projets. Un exemple: la transformation de la biomasse en énergie. Stratégie de développement Depuis le mois de février dernier, l’Egypte se dote r d’une vision de développement durable. Sa stratégie :   la vision 2030. La santé, l’environnement et l’Energie font partie des secteurs décrits. Dans le domaine de la santé, l’Egypte souhaite mettre en place un système sanitaire intégral de meilleur qualité, réduire de 50% le taux de naissance et le taux de mortalité des enfants de moins 5 ans, réduire la mortalité maternelle, permettre l’accès à 80% aux services de base de la santé et assurer la couverture à 100% pour tous les types de vaccination. Dans le secteur de l’ environnement l’Egypte veut sensibiliser la population sur la protection de la nature et la réduction des effets des changements climatiques. Ses mesures : arrêter la détérioration de l’environnement, maintenir l’équilibre de l’environnement, utiliser d’autres modes de consommation, protéger la biodiversité, gérer les déchets, respecter les engagements internationaux. L’acccord de Paris personnalise les engagement du pays. Le texte de Paris répond en partie à la demande des pays en développement en terme d’actions liées aux mesures d’adaptation et d’atténuation présentées dans les plans d’action nationaux. Mais la question du financement reste à résoudre.La prochaine conférence des Nations Unies à Marrakech aura pour ambition d’y répondre. Les défis L’Egypte est considérée comme le deuxième plus gros consommateur d’électricité du continent Africain, couplé par  une démographie galopante. Avec une population de 10 millions d’habitants, l’Egypte doit aussi faire face à une insécurité alimentaire, notamment dans la région de Quena, Assuit, Sohag et Luxor, d’après le récent rapport sur les perspectives de développement publié conjointement par la BAD et l’OCDE. « À mesure que les demandeurs d’emploi migrent vers les zones urbaines, la population des villes augmente, ajoutant aux pressions qui pèsent déjà sur l’infrastructure urbaine, » explique les auteurs du rapport. Et d’ajouter : «  Pour remédier à ce problème, l’État a...

Read More
COP 22 Maroc : Atelier francophone sur la finance climatique
Mai03

COP 22 Maroc : Atelier francophone sur la finance climatique

COP 22 Maroc : Atelier francophone sur la finance climatique Le second atelier régional sur la finance climatique pour les pays francophones a lieu à Casablanca au Maroc du 3 au 5 mai. Cet atelier permet aux pays francophones de comprendre  les modalités d’accès aux financements d’adaptation aux changements climatiques. Description. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Le contexte Organisé par l’Institut de la Francophonie pour le Développement (IFDD) en collaboration avec le fonds d’adaptation, le centre 4C (Climate Change Competences Centre) et l’Agence pour le Développement Agricole (ADA) , le second atelier francophone régional  sur le climat ( après celui de Dakar) permet aux pays de comprendre les modalités d’accès aux financements de projets et de programmes d’adaptation aux effets des changements climatiques au niveau national et local, d’après Arona Soumaré, chargé de programme à l’Institut de la Francophonie pour le développement durable. Cet atelier offre de grandes opportunités pour les pays en développement francophones sur l’accès aux finances publiques des changements climatiques au niveau international, selon M. Soumaré. L’atelier intervient dans le cadre du programme de renforcement des capacités permettant aux pays francophones de respecter leurs engagements vis-à-vis des conventions environnementales de Rio : la convention sur les changements climatiques, la convention sur la diversité biologique et celle sur la lutte contre la désertification. Cet atelier, selon les organisateurs, réaffirme la volonté de la francophonie de rendre accessible l’information en français sur les procédures d’accès au financement du climat. Son contenu Le premier jour de l’atelier est consacré à l’accréditation. Les participants sont sensibilisés aux processus d’accréditation de la finance climatique  : normes fiduciaires, environnementales et sociales, soutien à la préparation, succès et défis. Une mise au point de la finance climatique dans les pays francophones est actuellement présentée. Il y a aussi une identification des besoins des pays souhaitant obtenir une accréditation. Le jour suivant est consacré au développement et à la mise en en œuvre de projet du Fonds d’Adaptation. Cette journée prend en compte la problématique du financement climat et le genre. Les participants discutent des mesures post-accréditation et des meilleurs pratiques dans le développement et la mise en œuvre de projets. La troisième journée est consacrée à la collaboration multi-intervenants. Des stratégies régionales de mobilisation de la finance climatique dans les pays francophones sont évoquées. D’autres mécanismes internationaux de financement climatique sont analysés. La question du rôle du secteur privé dans la vulgarisation de l’adaptation et le financement fait l’objet de discussions. Quels sont les pays concernés  par cet atelier? Le Bénin, le Burkano Faso, le Cap Vert, le Sénégal, le Togo, le Niger, la Guinée Bissau, la Guinée Conakry, la Côte d’Ivoire, le Mali, le Maroc, la Tunisie,...

Read More
Justice climatique et développement durable: leitmotivs de la jeunesse comorienne
Avr12

Justice climatique et développement durable: leitmotivs de la jeunesse comorienne

Justice climatique et développement durable: Leitmotivs de  la jeunesse comorienne Depuis quelques années, Abdillahi Maoulida, jeune chercheur comorien, participe aux réunions annuelles du Centre africain pour les politiques en matière de climat de la Commission Economique pour l’Afrique. Fin 2015, il crée  la Plateforme des Jeunes pour la Justice Climatique et le Développement durable aux Comores (PJCDD). Trois questions pour comprendre. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Qui est Abdillahi Maoulida ? Jeune chercheur à l’Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, la Pêche et l’Environnement aux Comores, Abdillahi Maoulida intègre la société civile comorienne en 2014. «  La société civile comorienne n’est pas vraiment représentative de la société comorienne, » fait-il remarquer. Il crée ainsi l’African Youth Initiative on Climate Change Comoros ( AYICC). L’African Youth Initiative on Climate Change est un réseau de jeunes activistes africains , présent en Afrique pour sensibiliser les populations sur les changements climatiques. Initié par l’Union Africaine , ce réseau de sensibilisation est né en 2006 lors de la présentation de la charte africaine sur la jeunesse. Fin 2015, en partenariat avec le réseau panafricain pour la justice climatique (PACJA), M. Maoulida fonde la Plateforme des Jeunes pour la Justice Climatique et le Développement Durable Aux Comores (PJCDD). En quoi consiste la Plateforme pour la justice climatique aux Comores ? Cette Plateforme se veut représentative de la jeunesse comorienne. Elle sensibilise la population comorienne sur les enjeux des questions des changements climatiques et de développement durable. Elle incite les femmes rurales à participer au débat climatique aux Comores au niveau national, régional et mondial. Elle souhaite faciliter la mise en œuvre des décisions sur le changement climatique et le Développement durable , en accompagnant les activités de l’Etat comorien. Mais elle veut aussi accompagner les porteurs de projets. Elle ambitionne de collaborer sur le long terme avec la société civile africaine et mondiale, en exprimant les besoins et les priorités des Comores. Elle participe aux réunions des financements internationaux en tant qu’ observateur.  Objectifs:comprendre le fonctionnement des financements et  permettre une réflexion pour une mise œuvre de projets pilotes . Abdillahi Maoulida a participé à la première réunion de préparation d’accès au fonds Vert de l’ONU en Egypte, l’an dernier. Comment cette plateforme travaille-t-elle ? En étroite collaboration avec l’ African Youth Initiative on Climate Change, cette plateforme travaille aussi en réseau au niveau national avec des association de jeunes, des groupes d’étudiants, des mouvements de femmes rurales. Elle est également en contact avec les institutions nationales et internationales aux Comores....

Read More

En continuant à utiliser le site, vous acceptez l’utilisation des cookies. Plus d’informations

Les paramètres des cookies sur ce site sont définis sur « accepter les cookies » pour vous offrir la meilleure expérience de navigation possible. Si vous continuez à utiliser ce site sans changer vos paramètres de cookies ou si vous cliquez sur "Accepter" ci-dessous, vous consentez à cela.

Fermer