COP 22- Bangladesh: Beyond grid connectivity
Sep28

COP 22- Bangladesh: Beyond grid connectivity

  COP 22- Bangladesh: Beyond grid connectivity   A  delegation of Tanzanians  came to visit Bangladesh recently.  Basically, it was for  learning  how to accelerate access to energy for poor people in the rural areas without having to link them to the national grid. By Deodatus Mfugale   Rural: access to energy     Two things are known to change quickly the lives of the rural population and lift them out of poverty. One of them is the provision of electricity. When poor families are provided with electricity the quality of life improves for the entire family as well as for individual members of the family.   Some research in Bangladesh, for example, has shown that the children’s average study time had increased by about six percent and their absence from school due to sickness reduced by 20 percent with access to electricity . Small retail businesses run by poor families had also shown to rise by eight percent due to provision of electricity.   The challenge however, is to provide electricity to many people within a short time so as to scale up poverty reduction at family level. Many developing countries tend to take the path of connecting rural families to the national grid, with the result that only a few people are connected after a long time and usually at a high cost.   However some countries have shown that small off-grid systems are the answer when the goal is to supply many poor families with electricity within a short time.   “Some people think that supplying many rural families with electricity from a 100 percent renewable source is abstract,” explained  recently Mr. Dipal Barua Founder and Chairman of Bright Green Energy Foundation (BGEF) of Bangladesh.   “Yet this is feasible if  we aim at small and simple solar systems that can supply individual families enough power to light their homes and provide other simple services like charging mobile phones,” he added.   Between 2010 and 2014, 3.5 million households had for the first time been installed with simple solar systems which benefited about 15 million people. Since then about 50,000 families install new solar systems of between 10Watts and 135Watts every month.  The target is to provide electricity from simple solar systems to six million households by end of next year.     Linking to Tanzania   For people in the rural areas having electricity from non-grid sources is a leap that takes them to new levels of development. Otherwise they would have to wait for decades to be connected to power supply from the national grid.     More importantly, such a family would stop...

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COP 22-Comores- Les océans: “L’Afrique et  Oman, c’est une longue histoire”- Vice-Ministre omanais Hamed Said Al Oufi
Sep18

COP 22-Comores- Les océans: “L’Afrique et Oman, c’est une longue histoire”- Vice-Ministre omanais Hamed Said Al Oufi

COP 22-Comores- Les océans: “L’Afrique et  Oman, c’est une longue histoire”- Vice-Ministre omanais Hamed Said Al Oufi Diplômé d’un PHD,   gestion des pêches et économie,  obtenu à l’Université de Hull en Angleterre,  Dr. Hamed Said Al Oufi est Vice- ministre de l’Agriculture et des pêches du Sultanat d’Oman depuis une décennie. Spécialiste du développement et de la mise en œuvre de projets spécifiques à la pêche, M. Said Al Oufi,  revient en marge de la conférence ministérielle des économies des océans, sur l’importance des ressources halieutiques et les relations historiques entre l’Afrique et Oman. Au mois de décembre prochain, Oman et les Comores organisent une conférence internationale sur Oman et l’Afrique intitulée « Oman et les relations avec les Etats de la Corne de l’Afrique ». Depuis les années 70, le Sultanat d’Oman se dote d’une économie diversifiée , introduite par le Sultan Qabous Bin Said. Depuis 1976, le Sultanat a adopté des Plans quinquennaux visant à préserver la stabilité de la position financière et économique d’Oman, à travers un équilibre de développement des différents gouvernorats.Les secteurs de l’agriculture et la pêche ont un rôle important dans le quotidien des omanais. Nombreux sont les omanais à vivre de ces secteurs.  Ces secteurs  représentent  406,1 millions de Rial Omanais du Produit Intérieur Brut  d’Oman en 2014, soit une hausse de 9,4 pour cent sur le chiffre de 371,2 millions enregistré en 2013. Avec une croissance de 2% par rapport à 2013, le secteur de l’agriculture est  passé de 1.484,000 tonnes d’exportation en 2013 à 1,515 000 tonnes de produits en 2014. Cette croissance est liée, selon le gouvernement, a une meilleure productivité des surfaces consacrées aux légumes ( 313,000 tonnes en 2013 à 335, 000 tonnes en 2014), par l’usage des technologies  modernes. Avec 211 000 tonnes de poissons pêchés en 2014 contre 206 000 tonnes en 2013, le secteur de la pêche est en légère hausse. C’est l’un des principaux vecteurs économique du pays. La pêche issue de technique traditionnelle représente  98% de la production. Attaché à l’environnement, le Sultanat d’Oman interdit le chalutage de fond, technique néfaste aux stockage et à la préservation de l’écosystème marin.   Entretien.     Eraenvironnement.com: Comment votre population comprend les questions de pêche ?   Dr Hamed Said Al Oufi:Oman a une très forte culture de pêche. Pendant très longtemps Oman dominait l’Océan Indien dans le commerce maritime.   Oman a travaillé  dans le monde entier,  avec des pays comme l’Inde, la Chine, et le continent africain. Cette culture a été transmise à travers les générations. La pêche est donc est très appréciée par la jeune génération à Oman. Surtout de nos jours, avec les efforts du gouvernement...

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Oman and Africa : a strong relation
Juin19

Oman and Africa : a strong relation

  Oman and Africa : a strong relation By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   Recently a business delegation from the Sultanate of Oman came to Tanzania to strengthen economic ties. Tanzania is seeking to embark on a major industrialisation drive , as  international media reported  during the Oman delegation visit. Enhance economic ties Oman and Tanzania are seeking new investment partnerships. Duqm, Salalah and Sohar ports could be linked to  Dar es Salaam Port for new markets. Oman is indeed willing to open  new markets in Africa through Tanzania and its  coastline on the Indian Ocean. Tanzania could be the gateway to several countries on the continent, observers said before and during the Oman delegation visit. Oman is planning to invest in Sugar, cassava, cereals crops processing industry in Tanzania. Oman and Africa, especially eastern Africa have strong relations for many years. In the video below,  Michael Katz, chief executive officer of Oman Aqua Science, said that ecological studies found that Oman and Zanzibar used the first trading vessel. For which purpose ? Agriculture and Fisheries. Diversity The agricultural and fisheries sectors play an important role in the daily lives of the omanis. These sectors represent 406.1 millions OR of the Oman GDP in 2014. The fisheries sector increased slightly from 2013 to 2014, 211 000 fishes were captured in 2013, whereas in 2013, there were  206 000. In Oman, bottom trawling is prohibited as the Sultanate is committed to preserve the environment and the marine ecosystem. The Sultanate has a diverse agriculture and climate said, in the film,  Dr Nadiya Al Saady of Oman Animal & Plant Genetic Resources Center ( OAPGRC). To the view of  Shawn Basson of Nehad Agronomy Services, Oman is the food basket of the middle east from January to March. It provides food to its counterparts. Sustainable strategies and opportunities «  Oman is part of the GCC [The Gulf Cooperation Council]. It is very closed to India, subcontinent, Eastern Africa. These people have 1,5 billion people leaving there. They have a great demand for food, » said Saleh Al Shanfari from Oman Food Investment Holding co. With climate change opportunities and promotion of countries sustainable strategies, customers are more demanding. «  People want to know where the food is produced. People want to have fresh food and organic food, »she emphasized. Watch the...

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REDD+ Tanzania : More transparency needed for the communities
Avr18

REDD+ Tanzania : More transparency needed for the communities

REDD+ Tanzania : More transparency needed for the communities By Deodatus Mfugale While global leaders are continuing to discuss how to develop and implement national Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation strategies ( REDD+), some countries like Tanzania are facing dualities. The benefits of the Participatory Forest Management programme In Tanzania, the Participatory Forest Management (PFM) programme, a strategy to achieve sustainable forest management by encouraging the management or co-management of forest and woodland resources by the communities living closest to the resources, is better assimilated by the communities than the UN Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation programme. In Kilwa district, villages have created village land forest reserves which they own, conserve and harvest, according to sustainable resource consumption principles. It is part of the Participatory Forest Management  programme. This programme intends to achieve sustainable forest management by encouraging the management or co-management of forest and woodland resources by the communities living closest to the resources. This programme allows villages to own 100 percent of the forests and thus become equally responsible for 100 percent of the revenue that comes from sale of forest products. The process to declare a village land forest reserves takes time, a couple of years . It also requires a substantial amount of money to meet costs such as surveying the forest land. However, all activities are done by the village with some technical and financial support from the district council or NGO. With the Participatory Forest Management programme, villages like Mchichiri in Ruangwa district found it worthwhile to borrow money from a neighbouring village which had accomplished the programme. « We asked Nahangwa village, our neighbor, to borrow us some money. With our own funds and this money, we’ve started the process to have our own forest reserve. We have completed the process and paid the debt. After one year we will be ready to realise the benefits,” says Charles Sumula Mchichiri village executive officer. The Participatory Forest Management programme has won hearts of villagers. It gives them sustainable tangible benefits. This programme become a driving force for communities to take forest conservation seriously. In Kilwa district for example, villages have built classrooms for primary schools and equipped them with desks. Others provide uniforms and lunch to school children which number more than 400. REDD+ : a different story For Mr. Cassian Sianga, Coordinator of the Tanzania Forest Working Group of Tanzania Natural Resources Forum, the Participatory Forest Management  programme is easy to understand as it is a local initiative. Whereas, the UN Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+)  programme is a foreign concept. « REDD + provides little chance for locals to...

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Tanzania : Climate Change can be a primary boost to development.
Mar09

Tanzania : Climate Change can be a primary boost to development.

By Deodatus Mfugale Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Climate Change has affected Tanzania in the rainy season from 2014 to 2015, according to Experts from Eastern Africa. In some parts of Singida, Dodoma, Shinyanga and Manyara regions, the semi-arid region of Tanzania, the rainy season did not start in November as expected. Around 70 per cent of 45 million people living in Tanzania depend on agriculture for their livelihood. But as climate change is affecting the country with deforestation and land degradation, life isn’t easy. In the last six previous seasons, this situation has a devastating impacts on the lives and livelihoods of many Tanzanians.   Dryland communities have been and are set to be among the worst affected. These people are heavily dependent upon fragile ecosystem services for their livelihoods. But those services—from nutrient cycling; flood regulation and biodiversity to water; food and fibre, are under threat from a variety sources such as urban expansion and unsustainable farming settlements. Climate change is now aggravating these challenges. But Climate Change can be also a primary boost to development. “Combating climate change and helping communities to adapt to its impacts represents an opportunity for new and more sustainable investments. It can also contribute to improved livelihoods, fighting poverty and enhance economic resilience among dryland communities,” says Dr Emma Liwenga, from the Pathways to Resilience In Semi-arid Economies (PRISE) Programme of Eastern African . A programme for sustainability As it written in its website « Pathways to Resilience in Semi-Arid Economies (PRISE) is a five-year, multi-country research project that generates new knowledge about how economic development in semi-arid regions can be made more equitable and resilient to climate change. » Among other things, the eastern african programme seeks to raise the economic potential within the dryland areas. The dryland communities can take opportunites to invest for their own development.   Most of the arid and semi-arid areas of Tanzania have land, suitable for small-scale farming. « Tanzania is the largest country in East Africa, » noted the PRISE website. The country have abundant water . Communities can engage in beekeeping, small-scale mining and sunflower oil production. However the potential for economic development has not been fully utilized due to limited investments. « Investing in the beef value chain » There is a need to establish a tripartite relationship between government, investors and inhabitants of the drylands. It would raise funding to these areas and ensure economic resilience of the communities. At the same time, it will guarantee returns to investments. Many dryland inhabitants are pastoralists, sedentary or nomadic, or agro-pastoralists. For many years, they have lived with variable rainfall and frequent droughts using a range of local strategies to cope with...

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