COP 22: Why Marrakesh Is More Important Than Paris COP21? – Olumide Idowu
Oct31

COP 22: Why Marrakesh Is More Important Than Paris COP21? – Olumide Idowu

COP 22: Why Marrakesh Is More Important Than Paris COP21? COP 22 will be held in Marrakesh, Morocco, from 7 to 18 November 2016. COP 20 in Lima was tagged the COP of negotiations of a universal climate change agreement, COP 21 in Paris last year was a COP of Agreement while COP 22 in Morocco is tagged the COP of Implementation. Taking critical decisions to ensure the implementation of the Paris Agreement is the major endeavor at COP 22 in Morocco. Last year, African Development Bank support contributed significantly to ensuring that Africa’s concerns were addressed in the Paris Agreement. The Bank has also committed to triple its climate change finance to about USD 5 billion per year and to provide USD 12 billion on renewable energy investments by 2020. In consistence with the New Deal on Energy for Africa that provides a good entry point for the implementation of the Paris Agreement, and given that COP 22 is a key milestone for the implementation of that Agreement, it is important that Africa is fully on board, while ensuring linkages with the Bank’s High Fives. “To make the Paris Agreement a real-world success story we need more than a historic political agreement, we need practical climate action to “decouple GDP from GHG” – or economic growth from greenhouse gases – as UN climate chief Christiana Figureres put it during a lecture at Climate-KIC partner the Grantham Institute.” Fours ways Marrakesh is going to help achieve that: Going from National to Global Action Plans is very important: In the run up to Paris, countries submitted their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Now, they are preparing their first climate action plans (NDCs) – dropping the ‘Intended’ from the title – which will be updated every five years and should represent an increase in ambition. This is the often cited ‘ratcheting’ mechanism built into the Paris Agreement. In Marrakesh, countries will hope to agree on how the stock-taking exercise should work every five years, and how they can make sure it will indeed ratchet up the level of ambition around the world. The action plans outline the post-2020 climate actions of each country and contain details such as emission-reduction targets and how governments plan to make those happen. A range of policies, including those addressing the aviation and maritime sectors (which are missing from the Paris Agreement), need to be drawn up and implemented to create what is often called the “enabling environment” for the transition to a low-carbon economy.   Making Measuring Progress Transparent will keep the commitment: Perhaps even more important, are...

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COP 22- Morocco- Empowering  young people- Faouzia Bahloul
Oct25

COP 22- Morocco- Empowering young people- Faouzia Bahloul

COP 22- Morocco- Empowering  young people- Faouzia Bahloul The 12th   Conference  of youth  will be held in Marrakech from 4 to 6 November, prior to COP 22. Since 2005, young people meet every year before the UN Climate Conference. Faouzia Bahloul, one of the two winners of COP 22 video competition, will  be one of  the ambassadors of young people from Tunisia. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache This year will be special as  the COP 22 Morrocan presidency  message calls  for action during the UN Climate Conference .  Young people are invited to participate in  various workshops, lectures, exhibitions. Faouzia Bahloul, one of the two winners of COP 22 video competition,  will  be one of  the ambassadors of young people from Tunisia. She will work with the communications team of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) as a reporter. In  her video  “ Thinking Renewable”, she  explains the research she did for two years  on biogas produced and  microalgea. “Think Renewable” is about the need to increase the use of renewable energy. Faouzia Bahloul won the UN competition earlier this month. Watch her...

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Journée Afrique 2016- Energie et numérique: ” on se repose sur la dynamique des pays”- Pascal Veillat (PDG Arelis)
Oct25

Journée Afrique 2016- Energie et numérique: ” on se repose sur la dynamique des pays”- Pascal Veillat (PDG Arelis)

Journée Afrique 2016- Energie et numérique: ” on se repose sur la dynamique des pays”- Pascal Veillat (PDG Arelis) Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Du 26 au 28 octobre, le Ministère français  de l’Economie et des Finances  accueillera la seconde édition du développement et du numérique  intitulée « journée Afrique 2016.  PDG du groupe Arelis, Pascal Veillat présente en amont la stratégie de sa filiale: Thomson Broadcast. Entretien.     Du 26 au 28 octobre, le Ministère français  de l’Economie et des Finances  accueillera la seconde édition du développement et du numérique  intitulée ” journée Afrique 2016″. Plusieurs ministres africains en charge du numérique sont attendus à cet événement: Afrique du Sud, Egypte, Côte d’Ivoire, Maroc, Tunisie, Comores, Burkina Faso, Madagascar, Maurice, Angola, Congo, Tchad, Togo, Mauritanie, Sénégal, Gabon, Mali, Benin et Soudan.  Nombreux acteurs français et africains du numérique discuteront des dernières avancées des nouvelles technologies. L’entreprise française Thomson Broadcast, fililale du groupe Arelis spécialisé dans l’électronique notamment,  présentera ses systèmes d’intégration analogiques et numériques et son offre sur les énergies renouvelables  en Afrique. Le groupeArelis ( Chiffre d’Affaires de 50 millions d’euros)  a intégré Thomson Broadcast en 2013. Dans un entretien accordé à eraenvironnement.com, le PDG d’Arelis, Pascal Veillat,  explique la stratégie de l’entreprise française en Afrique et revient entre autres sur les initiatives réussies. Ecoutez pascalveillatpdgarelis    ...

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COP 22- Bangladesh- Energy: Women are game-changers in promoting access to clean energy
Oct23

COP 22- Bangladesh- Energy: Women are game-changers in promoting access to clean energy

  COP 22- Bangladesh- Energy: Women are game-changers in promoting access to clean energy   A group of Tanzanians visited Bangladesh a few weeks  ago to learn about renewable energy initiatives in this country with the aim  to help Tanzania  “achieving 100 percent use of renewable energy”. The Tanzania delegation comprised representatives from the Parliament, the Ministry of Energy and Mineral resources, the civil society and the media.   Report by Deodatus Mfugale Dhaka, Bangladesh Rural women training Modhukhali village in Bangladesh-  Here is Shahana Begama in a classroom, speaking to 20 women. The women are listening deeply. On a table, one can see various components: a solar system, a bulb, a solar panel, a control panel, battery…These tools are used by Mrs Begama during a training. Today, she explains how to use the  Solar Home System ( SHS), a cheap and a simple solar equipment. It provides electricity to poor family. The aim of the training is to assure families that they can have access to energy easily  . The training programme helps also families to used  solar systems. It creates a positive social force in the village as it promotes renewable energies technologies. “By implementing this programme, those women who come from poor, disadvantaged families will be able to contribute to the family income, especially  improving the education and health  of their  their children,” explained Dipal Chandra Barua, Chairman and Founder of GGEF. Over 400 women in rural Bangladesh have been trained in servicing solar systems installed in their homes since 2010. This is thanks to the Bright Green Energy Foundation (BGEF) which strives to provide access to clean energy to poor families in the rural areas. By December last year (2015), four million solar homes systems had been installed while almost 50,000 SHS are being installed in rural homes every month. Women Empowerment Besides repairing and maintaining their own Solar Home System, the women also provide maintenance services to other community members and train other rural women to become “green technicians, according to Mr Barua. “Some women technicians assemble and repair solar accessories: they can earn more than Tk6000 (approximately USD 76) per month. This is not a very big amount of money but it helps rural families to meet their needs,” he said. “We have taken the assembling and repairing of solar accessories to the rural areas at the users’ doorstep and created ‘green’ jobs for rural women while promoting women entrepreneurs of the future,” he added. Strategy Building capacity and helping people having access to energy is really needed and helpful said  trainees. “My children can now study and do their homework at home...

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COP 22- Application de l’Accord  de Paris : financement des pertes et préjudices
Oct16

COP 22- Application de l’Accord de Paris : financement des pertes et préjudices

COP 22- Application de l’Accord  de Paris : financement des pertes et préjudices Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Interrogations Reconnus par l’Accord de Paris, les pertes et préjudices  seront à nouveau discutés à Marrakech ( Maroc) pendant la COP 22 du 7 au 18 novembre prochain.  Entrées dans les négociations à Varsovie (COP 19), les pertes et préjudices se définissent   par la montée du niveau de la mer, les typhons très violents, l’érosion côtière qui ne peuvent pas s’intégrer dans les mécanismes d’adaptation d’après les experts . Pendant la COP 21, la société civile s’est manifestée vivement pour que le terme responsabilité soit intégré dans le texte de Paris. Objectif: permettre aux pays  en développement ( en particulier les Petits Etats Insulaires en Développement) d’accéder au financement rapidement face aux pertes de vies humaines et matériels causés par les  changements climatiques.   Mais que reste-t-il des revendications de la société civile ? selon elle, cette notion de responsabilité, retirée du texte de Paris   empêche les pays en développement de revendiquer une compensation. Quelles seront les conséquences juridiques  à terme  de ce retrait ? Qui va payer ? Quel sera le rôle du fonds vert pour le climat ? Les débouchés Récemment, le Comité permanent des Finances* de la Convention s’est réuni à Manille (Philippines). Le Comité  s’est intéressé au rôle du Fonds Vert dans le soutien des activités traitant des pertes et préjudices. Différents points  de vue ont été évoqués :  l’élargissement du mandat du fonds vert  pour couvrir la notion de pertes et préjudices,  et suggestion pour que ce fonds de l’ONU   plaide auprès d’autres institutions  pour développer  la mise en oeuvre d’instruments financiers liés aux pertes et préjudices. Quelles seraient les alternatives ?D’après les recommandations du Comité,  les réformes sur les subventions aux énergies fossiles, le prix du carbone mais aussi des allégements de la dette des pays  vulnérables pourraient être des solutions de financements.   Comprendre les pertes et préjudices Selon les experts du Comité, de nombreux travaux doivent être entrepris pour traiter des catastrophes à déclenchements lents,  mais aussi celles à déclenchements rapides.Le secteur des assurances peut contribuer aux discussions et peut soutenir le développement  de potentiels instruments dans ce domaine, expliquent les experts dans leurs recommandations. Au-delà de la finance, les experts du Comité pensent que le renforcement des politiques pour faciliter la compréhension de la gestion des risques sont des éléments importants. Le renforcement des capacités des communautés et l’intégration du secteur privé sont tout aussi  essentiels. L’Accord de Paris entrera en vigueur  le 4 novembre prochain. Les deux seuils nécessaires ont été franchis :  celui des 55% des émissions mondiales de gaz à effet de serre couvertes par les Parties et...

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COP 22- Bangladesh: Beyond grid connectivity
Sep28

COP 22- Bangladesh: Beyond grid connectivity

  COP 22- Bangladesh: Beyond grid connectivity   A  delegation of Tanzanians  came to visit Bangladesh recently.  Basically, it was for  learning  how to accelerate access to energy for poor people in the rural areas without having to link them to the national grid. By Deodatus Mfugale   Rural: access to energy     Two things are known to change quickly the lives of the rural population and lift them out of poverty. One of them is the provision of electricity. When poor families are provided with electricity the quality of life improves for the entire family as well as for individual members of the family.   Some research in Bangladesh, for example, has shown that the children’s average study time had increased by about six percent and their absence from school due to sickness reduced by 20 percent with access to electricity . Small retail businesses run by poor families had also shown to rise by eight percent due to provision of electricity.   The challenge however, is to provide electricity to many people within a short time so as to scale up poverty reduction at family level. Many developing countries tend to take the path of connecting rural families to the national grid, with the result that only a few people are connected after a long time and usually at a high cost.   However some countries have shown that small off-grid systems are the answer when the goal is to supply many poor families with electricity within a short time.   “Some people think that supplying many rural families with electricity from a 100 percent renewable source is abstract,” explained  recently Mr. Dipal Barua Founder and Chairman of Bright Green Energy Foundation (BGEF) of Bangladesh.   “Yet this is feasible if  we aim at small and simple solar systems that can supply individual families enough power to light their homes and provide other simple services like charging mobile phones,” he added.   Between 2010 and 2014, 3.5 million households had for the first time been installed with simple solar systems which benefited about 15 million people. Since then about 50,000 families install new solar systems of between 10Watts and 135Watts every month.  The target is to provide electricity from simple solar systems to six million households by end of next year.     Linking to Tanzania   For people in the rural areas having electricity from non-grid sources is a leap that takes them to new levels of development. Otherwise they would have to wait for decades to be connected to power supply from the national grid.     More importantly, such a family would stop...

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