Implementing climate policies by developed countries-SBI
Fév14

Implementing climate policies by developed countries-SBI

Implementing climate policies by developed countries-SBI  By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   18 developed countries will present their achievements in implementing climate policies next May in Bonn, during the forty-sixth session of the Subsidiary Body for Implementation ( SBI). According to the UNFCCC, the implementation updates involve an important preparatory stage, which includes an online question and answer period among Governments.  To this end, actions and inputs from all Parties are needed in the next few months and can be submitted via the ‘MA Portal’. Among the 18 countries that will present updates are the United States of America, France and the Russian Federation are (full list of countries can be found here)....

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To Bonn and Beyond
Fév14

To Bonn and Beyond

To Bonn and Beyond Message from the Incoming COP 23 President Prime Minister of Fiji Frank Bainimarama   Maintaining  the momentum of the Paris Agreement Bula vinaka! Wherever you are the world, I convey my warmest greetings, along with the greetings of the Fijian people. Fiji assumes the Presidency of COP 23 determined to maintain the momentum of the 2015 Paris Agreement and the concerted effort to reduce carbon emissions and lower the global temperature, which was reinforced at COP 22 in Marrakesh. To use a sporting analogy so beloved in our islands, the global community cannot afford to drop the ball on the decisive response agreed to in Paris to address the crisis of global warming that we all face, wherever we live on the planet. That ball is being passed to Fiji and I intend, as the first incoming COP president from a Small Island Developing State, to run with it as hard as I can. We must again approach this year’s deliberations in Bonn as a team – every nation playing its part to combat the rising sea levels, extreme weather events and changing weather patterns associated with climate change. And I will be doing everything possible to keep the team that was assembled in Paris together and totally focused on the best possible outcome. “Our concerns are the concerns of the entire world” I intend to act as COP President on behalf of all 7.5 billion people on the planet. But I bring a particular perspective to these negotiations on behalf of some of those who are most vulnerable to the effects of climate change – Pacific Islanders and the residents of other SIDS countries and low-lying areas of the world. Our concerns are the concerns of the entire world, given the scale of this crisis. We must work together as a global community to increase the proportion of finance available for climate adaptation and resilience building. We need a greater effort to develop products and models to attract private sector participation in the area of adaptation finance. To this end, I will be engaging closely with governments, NGOs, charitable foundations, civil society and the business community. I appeal to the entire world to support Fiji’s effort to continue building the global consensus to confront the greatest challenge of our age. We owe it not only to ourselves but to future generations to tackle this issue head on before it is too late. And I will be counting on that support all the way to Bonn and beyond....

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“Southern Africa could create 78,000 new jobs in less than 20 years”- Thelma Munhequete
Déc19

“Southern Africa could create 78,000 new jobs in less than 20 years”- Thelma Munhequete

Southern Africa could create 78,000 new jobs in less than 20 years By Thelma Munhequete*   I have attended the global Gender Climate Alliance Innovation Forum, on the sideline of COP22,  the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change held in Marrakech, Morocco last november. The event was supported by different UN Agencies, organizations and stakeholders. 200 participants from different countries attended the two days event. Different experience and action where shared. Mary Robinson from the Mary Robinson Foundation, addressed the need of bigger and great Dialogues among Women  globally, Regionally and at a country level. Participants  have concentrated efforts to   improve gender balance and increase the participation of women in all UNFCCC processes. The Forum addressed key questions:  Where  Are We?  Where  Are We Going? What topics? How  can we integrate gender into urban climate policy? These are my thoughts. Where Are We? Gender in the communities is a relatively new topic in Mozambique. But it  has not received much attention although it is acknowledged that women and the youth are the most vulnerable groups in the communities. In its response to ensure social safety and protection of the citizens, the Government of Mozambique introduced measures through departments. This is further supported by Policy Frameworks and Legal instruments. As Country Executive Director of Africa Foundation which works  in southern Africa Countries, both in Mozambique and Zambia,  I  shared my experience in Mozambique. The lack   of data  is the main obstacle to integrate climate change, gender mainstream and the sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) simultaneously, in order to reduce poverty, promote food security and further gender equality in my country. Climate change is affecting the youth. In most  cases, the youth helps the family. The decrease in water pressure reduces the reliability of the water borehole in the villages. During drought,people move with their livestock for grazing and so require water. These additional challenges compromise the health condition of the youth as well as the education. It is critical to assess the viability of scaling up successful local solutions as well as identifying new solutions for them. Where  Are We Going? The associated lack of food, water and income is already visible and it’s reaching social consequences such adoption of risky behaviours consuming of alcohol abuse, criminal activities (Poaching), theft and corruption that lead to family breakdowns. We have embraced the principles of gender equality and empowerment of women and youth . Through our affiliation to the Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA), we  aim to mainstream gender in all  projects. We adopted the Global Environment Facility’s Gender Equality Action Plan (GEAP) to guide our gender action plan which forms part...

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Crowding the private sector into Africa’s climate action
Déc12

Crowding the private sector into Africa’s climate action

Crowding the private sector into Africa’s climate action It is in the enlightened self-interest of African private sector to begin to mobilise investment capital for Africa’s climate action LAGOS, Nigeria, December 12, 2016/ — The global community for climate action was spooked by the November 8 election of Donald Trump as the next President of the United States. The US President-elect had earned the sobriquet of “climate denier,” for his claim that climate change is a hoax. However, there is cautious optimism that his presidency will not overturn the global agenda on climate change. Hopefully, his views on climate change will change and align with reality when he settles into the Oval Office. Policymakers also believe that global climate agreements cannot be reversed easily. In the meantime, stakeholders are pressing on with formulating strategies for climate change mitigation and adaptation. The 22nd session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 22) to the United Nations’ agency on climate change held on November 7 – 18 in Marrakech, Morocco. At the climate talks, Australia, Japan, United Kingdom, Pakistan and seven other countries ratified the December 2015 Paris Climate Agreement. A total of 111 countries, including the United States, China and Member Countries of the European Union ratified the agreement by the time COP 22 concluded. Since the Paris accord entered into force on November 4th, quite earlier than anticipated, global action against climate change has effectively shifted to strategic programming. Therefore, in Marrakech, Canada, Germany, Mexico and the United States published their plans to significantly decarbonize their economies by 2050. A group of 47 developing nations also committed to running entirely on renewable energy sources “as rapidly as possible.” Some of the plans are already gaining traction. Investments in renewable energy totalled $286 billion in 2015. This surpassed by 3% the previous high of renewable energy investment achieved in 2011. Data gleaned from Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment 2016, a joint publication by United Nations Environment Programme and Bloomberg, further revealed that last year, coal and gas-fired electricity generation drew less than half the record investment made in solar, wind and other renewable energy sources. The trend in renewable energy investment is a mixed bag, even in developing countries. China alone accounted for 55% of total investment last year; Africa’s share was less than 5%. As climate change mitigation is being driven by investment in green energy, Africa is already taking the familiar position at the back seat on the ‘green energy train’. This was not unanticipated by climate policymakers. Although China is the clear leader in investment in renewables, other developing countries, in particular the low-income countries, are...

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NDCs: “The heart of the Paris Agreement” Hakima El Haite
Nov29

NDCs: “The heart of the Paris Agreement” Hakima El Haite

NDCs: “The heart of the Paris Agreement”- Hakima El Haite By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache “National climate plans, or NDCs, are at the heart of the Paris Agreement: through the NDC Partnership, we will also engage  more of the private sector, encourage South-South cooperation and make donors more responsive to countries’ needs,” said  Hakima El Haite, Climate Champion and Minister Delegate in Charge of the Environment, Ministry of Energy, Mines Water and the Environment, Morocco, recently at the UN Climate Change Conference in Marrakech. Her thoughts on NDCs Partnership Morocco and Germany initially co- chaired the National climate plans partnership, but now this NDC partnership is opened to all countries and relevant international institutions. Therefore, it  takes  three approach to drive climate action: -Create and disseminate insightful knowledge products that raise awareness of and enhance access to existing support initiatives, tools and resources, including finance. -Facilitate technical assistance and capacity building at national, regional and global levels by fostering greater collaboration between environment and -development agencies. -Facilitate enhanced financial support of existing and new country-specific, bilateral and international NDC support programs What is the View of the LDC Chairman ? What is the view of the African Group of...

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COP 22: Agriculteurs: les oubliés des négociations se sont exprimés
Nov23

COP 22: Agriculteurs: les oubliés des négociations se sont exprimés

COP 22: Agriculteurs: les oubliés des négociations se sont exprimés    A l’issue de la COP 22, les Etats ne sont pas parvenus à s’accorder sur un texte sur l’agriculture. Or , 90% des plans  nationaux  présentés l’an dernier , destinés à évaluer les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, lors de la COP 21  intègrent cette notion. Les agriculteurs, grands oubliés permanents des négociations, se sont pourtant exprimés à Marrakech.  Explications. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   Tabi Joda: pour l’agriculture coûte que coûte Dr Tabi Joda, basé au Cameroun, travaillant entre le Cameroun et le Nigeria, milite pour une meilleure reconnaissance du métier d’agriculteur en Afrique. Cette année, il a même initié une campagne de plantation d’arbres  dans le nord ouest du Nigéria , avec son organisation non gouvernementale, GreenAid.  Dans cet entretien accordé aux Nations Unies, pendant la COP 22,  cet  agriculteur  décrit les conséquences des changements climatiques  dans son pays :  Famine, insécurité alimentaire et migration .    L’Initiative Triple A: un levier de développement pour l’Afrique C’est l’une des mesures phares retenues en marge des négociations lors de la COP 22. Les négociations, cette année, n’ont pas permis d’établir une décision claire sur l’agriculture. Mais, l’initiative d’ Adaptation de l’Agriculture Africaine est considérée en quelque sorte comme le rempart de l’Afrique. Le Maroc a placé l’agriculture au centre des actions de la Conférence de l’ONU sur le Climat. Lancée en Avril 2016, cette initiative marocaine avait pour ambition de réorienter le débat du financement de l’adaptation de l’Agriculture en Afrique.  28 pays, au départs s’étaient prononcés pour promouvoir et favoriser la mise en oeuvre de projets concrets et innovants . Exemples :  gestion des sols,  maîtrise de l’eau agricole, gestion des risques climatiques et de renforcement des capacités et solutions de financement.L’initiative Triple  A est soutenue dorénavant par toute l’Afrique. Toutefois, pendant la COP 22, l’Afrique et les Pays en développement en général n’ont eu droit qu’à une déclaration: la déclaration de Marrakech, un  texte lu par le négociateur en chef du Maroc, Aziz Mekouar, devant les Parties où  il est indiqué que les Etats devraient ” renforcer et soutenir les efforts pour éradiquer la pauvreté, assurer la sécurité alimentaire, et prendre des mesures rigoureuses pour lutter contre les défis des changements climatiques dans le domaine de l’agriculture.” Les annonces Avant la COP 22,  le président de la Banque Africaine de Développement, Akinwumi  Adesina avait  annoncé un investissement  de  24 milliards USD au cours des dix prochaines années pour appuyer  la transformation agricole dans le continent pour mettre fin à la pauvreté en Afrique.  Autre annonce : le 17 novembre dernier, le  Ministère de l’Agriculture et de la Pêche...

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