COP 23 : A half victory for developing countries
Nov18

COP 23 : A half victory for developing countries

COP 23 : A half victory for  developing countries   The Un Climate Change negotiations ended at nearly 7 o’clock this morning with a song from the Fijians.  Started two weeks ago, these negotiations make time to find any compromise between developed and developing countries. As usual. The story. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   The implementation of the Paris Agreement have many issues: adaptation and mitigation through the NDCs, loss and damage,   adaptation,  adaptation fund, finance, transfer of technology, transparency, support and capacity building. All these elements have been taken separately through a facilitative dialogue launched during COP 21 in Paris and pursued in Marrakech during COP 22, then in Bonn with the Fiji presidency, and  the Talanoa Dialogue, a conversation between north and south representatives to achieve the long term pathway to 1,5°Celsius.   The Talanoa Dialogue “ We have been doing the job that we were given to do: advance the implementation guidelines of the Paris Agreement, and prepare for more ambitions actions for the Talanoa dialogue in 2018,” said the  Prime minister of Fiji and president of COP 23, Frank Bainimarama. For the Prime Minister of Fiji, there has been a positive momentum in various areas in COP 23 : the global community has embraced the Fiji  concept of grand coalition for greater ambition linking national governments, states and cities, civil society, the private sector and all women around the world. “ We have  launched a global partnership  to provide millions of climate vulnerable people an affordable access to insurance,” said the president of COP 23. For him, this COP has  put people first. It has connected the people who are not experts on climate change to the UN Climate  negotiations. According to him, it showed to the world that these people are facing climate change in their daily lives. What has been achieved? Saturday, 2.40 Am, the African negotiators left again the negotiations rooms and were happy:   “ We got it Adaptation Fund and Article 9.5,” said Ambassador Nafo from Mali and head of the African negotiators group. The decisions adopted says that there will be modalities for the accounting of financial resources provided and mobilized through public intervention in accordance to the article 9 of the Paris Agreement. The Article 9.5 of the Paris Agreement said the Developed country Parties shall biennially communicate indicative quantitative and qualitative information related to finance of both mitigation and adaptation. Back and Forth Last night was marked by Back and Forth from all the delegates. And it continued earlier in this morning.  At 3am, the Republic of Ecuador on behalf of the G77+ China group ( 134 countries) raised again...

Read More
COP 23: A fellowship programme launched for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries
Nov17

COP 23: A fellowship programme launched for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries

COP 23: A fellowship programme for Small Islands States and Least Developing Countries   A new one year  Programme titled “Capacity Award Programme to Advance Capabilities and Institutional Training  (CAPACITY) will be implemented by the Government of Italy and UN Climate Change. Explanations. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache The  Government of Italy and UN Climate Change have signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to launch a new Fellowship Programme aimed at strengthening the institutional capacity of the Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) to respond to the challenges arising from climate change. How will it work? It will support innovative analytical work on climate change in the context of sustainable development, promote a network of experts who can bring creating and innovative options to bear on questions of climate change, encourage the leadership potential of young and promising professionals in the fields. For  Patricia Espinosa, UN Climate Change Executive Secretary, this programme “marks an important step forward in our endeavor to ensure widest possible support to SIDS and LDC countries to combat climate change and help them build institutional capacity to resilience to climate impacts.” The government of Italy will provide support to launch this fellowship programme, according to Mrs Espinosa. Italy has agreed to provide a funding of 2,500,000 euros for the fellowship programme, which will initially be launched for a period for five years. Adaptation to climate change  in developing countries is crucial to enable these countries to Pursure the common objectives of developed and developing countries for sustainable development in a climate-friendly manner, said Gian Luca Galletti, the Italian Minister of the Environment, Land and Sea.   Who can have access to this programme?   SIDS and LDC mid-career professionals who are working in a broad range of national, regional, and local governmental organizations, ranging from educational institutions, research institutes and ministries are the target of this programme. Italy has agreed to provide a funding of 2,500,000 euros for the fellowship programme, which will initially be launched for a period for five years.   Annually, up to five one year fellowships will be awarded that can be further extended by one year. Selected fellows will have the opportunity to gain exposure to a wide range of opportunities available the UN Climate Change Secretariat in Bonn, Germany. They will be able to work on projects relating to the Paris Agreement, including Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), global climate action agenda, finance, legal, regulatory and institutional framework....

Read More
COP 23 :  « REDD + prêt à jouer son rôle”- Coalition des Nations à Forêts Tropicales Humides
Nov08

COP 23 :  « REDD + prêt à jouer son rôle”- Coalition des Nations à Forêts Tropicales Humides

COP 23 :  « *REDD + prêt à jouer son rôle”- Coalition des Nations à Forêts Tropicales Humides Lors de l’ouverture des travaux de mise en oeuvre de l’Accord de Paris, la Coalition des Nations à forêts tropicales humides représentée par la République Démocratique du Congo a exhorté toutes les parties prenantes, secteur privé y compris à suivre les décisions de la Convention Cadre des Nations Unies sur les Changements Climatiques ainsi que les conseils du Groupe d’Experts Intergouvernemental sur l’évolution du climat (GIEC).  Explications.   Par Houmi AHAMED-MIKIDACHE Lors de l’ouverture des travaux de mise en oeuvre de l’Accord de Paris, la Coalition des Nations à Forêts Tropicales Humides représentée par la République Démocratique du Congo a exhorté toutes les parties prenantes, secteur privé y compris à suivre les décisions de la Convention Cadre des Nations Unies sur les Changements Climatiques ainsi que les conseils du Groupe d’Experts Intergouvernemental sur l’évolution du climat (GIEC). « Le mécanisme de réduction des émissions résultant du déboisement et de la dégradation des forêts est le meilleur exemple d’un secteur qui est prêt à jouer son rôle, prêt à contribuer à la lutte contre les changements climatiques et prêt à être mis en œuvre », a déclaré ce mardi à,  Tosi Mpanu Mpanu, Négociateur en chef de la République Démocratique du Congo et représentant de la Coalition des Nations à forêts tropicales humides. Et de poursuivre : « le transfert international des résultats d’atténuation au titre de l’article 6 doit être fondé sur des règles rigides en matière d’intégrité environnementale, y compris des inventaires nationaux de gaz à effet de serre, des plateformes comptables et des registres pour éviter le double comptage. » Comme les autres groupes de négociateurs, tels que le Groupe 77 et la Chine, le groupe des négociateurs africains ainsi que celui des Petits Insulaires en Développement et celui des Pays les Moins Avancés, la Coalition des Nations à Forêts Tropicales Humides demande plus de transparence dans l’élaboration des contributions nationales présentées à Paris en 2015 et devant être révisées pour atteindre les objectifs de l’Accord de Paris, soit un objectif de  réduction de gaz à effet de serre allant de 2 à 1,5 degrès Celsius. « Nous devons augmenter les ambitions pré-2020 et post 2020 et élargir la portée de nos actions, » a déclaré M. Mpanu Mpanu. Ainsi, pour ce négociateur du bassin du Congo, les contributions sur les réductions de gaz à effet de serre des acteurs non étatiques doivent être exploitées. La décision des Etats-Unis de se retirer de l’Accord de Paris a fait émerger  de nombreuses actions portées par les  villes dans le monde, des Etats et villes d’ Amérique et d’après...

Read More
COP 23 : Les demandes du groupe des négociateurs africains
Nov08

COP 23 : Les demandes du groupe des négociateurs africains

COP 23 : Les demandes du groupe des négociateurs africains L’Afrique a souligné l’urgence de commencer le processus de développement d’un texte de négociation qui pourrait être adopté en Décembre 2018. Précisions. Par Houmi AHAMED-MIKIDACHE à Bonn ( Allemagne) L’Afrique a souligné l’urgence de commencer le processus de développement d’un texte de négociation qui pourrait être adopté en Décembre 2018. Ce texte devra être en lien avec le mandat du programme de travail de Paris, a déclaré lors de la session consacrée à la mise en application de l’Accord de Paris ce mardi , le président du groupe des négociateurs africains et représentant du Mali, Seyni Nafo. Le groupe des négociateurs africains soutient la déclaration du Groupe des 77+ la Chine qui demande plus de transparence et d’explications sur le financement des moyens de mise en oeuvre des contributions nationales notamment le financement de l’adaptation, des transferts de technologies, des moyens de réductions de gaz à effet de serre,  et du renforcement des capacités. Dans le cadre des différents travaux techniques de la mise en œuvre de l’Accord de Paris, l’Afrique sollicite plus d’éléments techniques procéduriers dans les conclusions pour assurer l’équilibre entre les différents groupes. L’Afrique requiert davantage d’explications concernant  notamment  la mise en application des contributions nationales liées à l’adaptation. Selon Seyni Nafo, dans l’accord de Paris, il existe en effet un minimum d’information sur l’atteinte des moyens de réduction de gaz à effet de serre, mais aucun élément n’est précisé sur l’adaptation. Il y a donc un déséquilibre. “Les quatre missions sur l’adaptation confiées  au Comité d’adaptation et aux experts des Pays les Avancés, collaborant avec le Comité permanent  sur la Finance ont reçu des mandats imprécis, » a affirmé M. Nafo. La question de l’adaptation aux changements climatiques, plus précisément du financement de l’adaptation est discutée depuis de nombreuses années. Lors de l’ouverture des travaux sur la mise en œuvre de l’Accord de Paris, les termes de responsabilités communes et différentiées ont été à nouveau soulevées   par le  groupe 77+ la Chine. Les pays développés, selon ce groupe, ont une dette auprès des pays en développement et doivent de fait payer pour la pollution causée dans ces pays. Le groupe des négociateurs africains, celui des Petits Etats Insulaires, ainsi que celui des Pays les Moins avancés et notamment le groupe représentant la Coalition des Nations à forêts tropicales humides ont affirmé soutenir cette position. D’après plusieurs institutions appuyées par des scientifiques, les pays en développement sont très vulnérables aux changements climatiques. Un récent rapport du Programme des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation mondiale a indiqué récemment que les inondations et sécheresses causées par les changements climatiques représentent 26% des...

Read More
COP 23: “no time to waste”
Nov07

COP 23: “no time to waste”

 The 2017 UN Climate Change Conference opened on Monday, with the aim of launching nations towards the next level of ambition needed to tackle global warming and put the world on a safer and more prosperous development path, recalled the UNFCCC Secretariat at the opening ceremony. Explanations. By Houmi AHAMED-MIKIDACHE in Bonn   Two years after the adoption of the Paris Climate Change Agreement, this conference held in Bonn and presided by Fiji, the first small island developing state to have this role. “The human suffering caused by intensifying hurricanes, wildfires, droughts, floods and threats to food security caused by climate change means there is no time to waste,” said Mr Frank Bainimarama, the Prime Minister of Fiji and president of COP 23. Critical According to the World Meteorological Organization, 2017 will be one of the three hottest years on records with many high-impact events including catastrophic hurricanes and floods, debilating heatwaves and drought. “The past three years have all been in the top three years in terms of temperature records. This is part of a long term warming trend,” said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas. And he added:  “We have witnessed extraordinary weather, including temperatures topping 50 degrees Celsius in Asia, record-breaking hurricanes in rapid succession in the Caribbean and Atlantic reaching as far as Ireland, devastating monsoon flooding affecting many millions of people and a relentless drought in East Africa. One of the consequences of climate change is food insecurity in developing countries especially. A review of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) found that, in developing countries, agriculture (crops, livestock, fisheries, aquaculture and forestry) accounted for 26% of all the damage and loss associated with medium to large-scale storms, floods and drought. For Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change, it is urgent to act. “The thermometer of risk is rising; the pulse of the planet is racing; people are hurting; the window of opportunity is closing and we must go Further and Faster Together to lift ambition and action to the next defining level, “she said. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the global health impacts of heatwaves depend not only on the overall warming trend, but on how heatwaves are distributed across where people live. Recent research shows that the overall risk of heat-related illness or death has climbed steadily since 1980, with around 30% of the world’s population now living in climatic conditions that deliver prolonged extreme heatwaves. Between 2000 and 2016, the number of vulnerable people exposed to heatwave events has increased by approximately 125 million. The negotiations According to UNFCCC secretariat, COP23 negotiators are keen to move forward on other...

Read More
COP 23-REDD + Congo-Brazzaville: Validation de la stratégie nationale
Oct15

COP 23-REDD + Congo-Brazzaville: Validation de la stratégie nationale

COP 23-REDD + Congo-Brazzaville: Validation de la stratégie nationale   Le Congo-Brazzaville vient récemment de valider son plan d’Investissement de la stratégie Nationale REDD+. Un plan visant à réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre en protégeant les forêts de la République du Congo. Analyse.   Par Marien Nzoukou-Massala   Le ministère de l’Economie forestière de la République du  Congo vient de présenter le plan d’investissement de la stratégique nationale sur la REDD + (reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation), l’initiative internationale de protection des forêts  signifiant la réduction des émissions liées à la déforestation, la dégradation forestière et sur l’accroissement des stocks de carbone.   De quoi s’agit-il ? Le plan d’investissement de la stratégie nationale sur la REDD+  couvre la période allant de 2018 à 2025. Le REDD + en anglais Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation est un mécanisme des Nations Unies de protection des forêts qui existe depuis 10 ans. Le Congo souhaite centraliser, canaliser et coordonner les fonds internationaux, nationaux, publics et privés destinés pour  appuyer la mise en œuvre de la Stratégie Nationale REDD+. Quelles seront les actions? Selon le ministère de l’Economie forestière, ce plan viendra structurer un cadre programmatique pour accueillir les investissements liés aux activités REDD+, tant sectorielles qu’habilitantes. Ses principes: la  conformité aux normes de  gouvernance démocratique, notamment celles contenues dans les engagements nationaux et les accords multilatéraux, le respect et la protection des droits des parties prenantes, la promotion et le renforcement des moyens de subsistance durables et de réduction de la pauvreté, la contribution à une politique de développement durable sobre en carbone, résiliente au climat et conforme aux stratégies nationales de développement, le maintien et l’amélioration des fonctions multiples de la forêt  afin d’ assurer notamment la préservation de la biodiversité.Selon le ministère de l’Economie forestière, ce plan viendra structurer un cadre programmatique pour accueillir les investissements liés aux activités REDD+, tant sectorielles qu’habilitantes. Les financements Pour la République du Congo, ce  Plan d’Investissement constitue donc le cadre de référence des actions qui seront mises en œuvre dans la période 2018-2025 et portant sur la réduction des émissions liées à la déforestation, la dégradation forestière et sur l’accroissement des stocks de carbone sur l’ensemble du territoire national. De même,  Il recense les activités en cours en lien avec la mise en œuvre de la Stratégie Nationale et identifie un portefeuille de programmes et de projets constitués d’activités complémentaires et diversifiées conçus pour mettre en œuvre la Stratégie Nationale. Durant ce plan, ces programmes prioritaires seront financés par le biais de financements bilatéraux et multilatéraux existants tels que le fonds mondial pour l’environnement, et d’autres...

Read More

En continuant à utiliser le site, vous acceptez l’utilisation des cookies. Plus d’informations

Les paramètres des cookies sur ce site sont définis sur « accepter les cookies » pour vous offrir la meilleure expérience de navigation possible. Si vous continuez à utiliser ce site sans changer vos paramètres de cookies ou si vous cliquez sur "Accepter" ci-dessous, vous consentez à cela.

Fermer