COP 23- CLIMATE ACTION: “We must be champions for change”- Patricia Espinosa
Juin22

COP 23- CLIMATE ACTION: “We must be champions for change”- Patricia Espinosa

Speaking recently at the conference “Austrian World Summit: From Sustainable Goals to Real Action”, organized by the group R20 Regions of Climate Action, the Executive Secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, Patricia Espinosa  addressed a statement on society collective responsibility in climate action. Read her full address below. Everyone is a hero Let me start by thanking R20 for the invitation to join you for the first Austrian World Summit. This summit opens at a crucial moment for the future of humanity. We have in our hands all the elements needed for meeting the climate change challenge, transforming reality and opening the door to a secure and stable future for all. In moments of great change, we have seen over and over again great people rising to lead this change. Now is truly a moment for these ‘action heroes’ and champions.People from all walks of life, and in all countries and on all continents, must carry the flag for sustainable development and action on climate change. Every level of society, every community and every sector of every economy must be involved. Austria, in convening this inaugural World Summit, is declaring itself an action hero – thank you Chancellor Kern and President Van der Bellen.Arnold Schwarzenegger, is another action hero not just for his work in film and as Governor of California, but for his establishment of R20 and highly visible advocacy.He is joined by UN Special Envoy for Cities and Climate Change Michael Bloomberg and Jerry Brown, the current governor of the State of California, and who has been designated by the Prime Minister of Fiji, in his role as President of COP 23, as special envoy for states and regions for this years’ climate change conference. Champions of climate action.Actor Leonardo DiCaprio, whose foundation is funding renewable energy projects in many R20 members, is also a hero. As are the scientists who help us understand the challenge, the public and private sector leaders that have recently reiterated support for the principles of Paris and every individual who makes a climate-conscious choice. Making the difference And when we mention these remarkable people and institutions, we also must look no further than the DSG Amina J Mohamed and her tireless work to realize the Sustainable Development Goals and now to implement them. This immense and important task is supported by Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, who himself champions the fact that “implementing the 2030 Agenda goes hand-in-glove with limiting global temperature rise and increasing climate resilience” and sees action on climate change as a tremendous opportunity. Our UN organization, the climate change secretariat, recognizes those who are making a difference through...

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Tanzania: Communities are fighting for their rights
Avr08

Tanzania: Communities are fighting for their rights

Tanzania: Communities are fighting for their rights   By Deodatus Mfugale Issues surrounding disputes over land ownership  are many in Tanzania and in Africa generally. From 2000 to 2010, several violent conflicts in various parts of Tanzania occurred between agribusiness investors and communities. The conflict thus involved three parties, the government, the investor and the local community. The villagers found that the government had colluded with the investor to deny them the right to own land. “The government had given us a raw deal. It was bad enough to sell the farm to the investor when people in the village needed that land. Giving the investor additional land made our situation worse,” said Alex Kyando, a resident of Kapunga village. In 2006 when the Tanzania government decided to privatize the Kapunga Rice Farm located in Mbeya Region ( Southern Highlands) to Export Trading Company, local communities were very disappointed and responded in a violent manner. In Babati District of Manyara Region, communities set on fire Tanzanian investor of Asian origin’s houses, stores, machinery, tractors. His relatives were also killed. The bloody incident was a climax of a long-standing conflict between the two parties: local communities alleging that the investor had unlawfully taken their land and they wanted it back. But the land was sold to the investor for a 100 years lease agreement. The local community originally offered the land to the government to create a state farm. But   the government had failed to manage it. Government Now things are changing and the demand by communities to uphold the right to own land is paying off.  In 2015,  the government declared that it would give back to the community the 1, 875 hectares of land that were sold to the investor of Kapunga Rice Farm which were over and above the original size of the farm. The government declaration became effective last year when the Minister responsible for lands announced that the parcel of land in question had been handed over to Mbarali District Council. “We have revoked the title deed for the land that was not originally part of Kapunga Rice Farm when it was sold to Export Trading Company. The Mbarali District Council will survey the land and give it back to the villagers,” said William Lukuvi, Minister for Lands. Arguments Until January this year, the survey had been completed and the land handed over to Kapunga Village Government for allocation to community members. Although there are complaints from some individuals that the allocation was not done fairly, most of the community members are happy with the government’s decision and the subsequent actions by the district council...

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What is next after the US election 2016?
Nov14

What is next after the US election 2016?

What is next after the US election 2016?   By Aya Kathir Column Trump and the Paris agreement: As the climate change and global warming become day after day a really great risk to people lives, it becomes the big issue of the post US election 2016.  Donald Trump, as he mentioned in his speeches and the debates during election,  doesn’t seem to believe in the climate change as an environmental issue or even as a real scientific evidence. The president elected mentioned during campaign that investing in the climate change field is  a waste of the U.S financial resources, and that the financial growth should be addressed to ensure the access of the clean water which by its role while guarantee the elimination of aliments like the malaria, and also to seek for alternative energy sources. But the reality is… Over the past several years, the western and southern states  have suffered from the worst droughts.  In the US history,  California for instance  grabs the attention on crops and the water issues. But Mr Trump says that the clean water will be one of “the most important issue that will face the next generation” During the first week of negotiations of the COP 22, the 22nd Conference of Parties in Morocco, questions were raised , about Trump’s situation via the Paris agreement and his intention to pull out the US of the Paris agreement, which will strongly affect the international efforts to limit the global warming. The US had pledged to $3billion to the UN Green Climate Fund which will give the financial support to the developing countries helping them to face the climate change. Stressing on the fact that, despite the elections’ results, fighting the climate change will strongly remain the first priority of the international community. According to observers, withdrawing the US, the world’s largest greenhouse polluter after China, from the Paris agreement will block other countries from fulfilling the agreement’s commitment and it will be considered as a step back from a process that already took years and years. The Paris agreement’s goal is to reduce the carbon dioxide emissions so that the atmosphere warming will drop down to at least 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit to protect the whole planet form a real extreme dangerous warming. Washington has already ratified the Paris agreement, the US is bound by the agreement to remain part of it for at least three years. After the three years, if really the US decides to cancel it, it must wait another year before it can formally leave. The Middle East through the election In the Middle East and North Africa with...

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COP 22-  Knowledge and Learning: Strategies for Managing Climate Change
Nov05

COP 22- Knowledge and Learning: Strategies for Managing Climate Change

COP 22-  Knowledge and Learning: Strategies for Managing Climate Change By Olumide Idowu   Education: the key Many Africans are aware that some changes occur in the environment year in and year out but they need to understand  such change: increased disease, food shortages, and extreme flooding at various localities during certain periods of the year. Yet there have been no efforts to reduce the occurrences or avert them altogether. It is urgent to educate the public of the signs of climate change as well as management and prevention strategies. Many of us are aware that climate change is severely affecting livelihoods in Africa through changes in rainfall patterns. About seventy percent of the farmers expressed that their crops were washed away by floods, eliminating their yields for consumption or sale. In some part of West African countries the fishermen were not spared since they could not catch as much fish as they used to and the environment was not conducive for human life since all the debris washed away by water or flood was deposited at various places. About 70 percent of them at various fishing ports lamented that they suffer this disaster yearly but do not have the solution to their problems. According to Zack [1], Knowledge Management consists of a series of strategies and practice used in an organization to identify, create, distribute and enable adoption of insights and experiences. Such insights and experiences consist of knowledge integrated into or embodied in organizational theories and practice [2]. For many years, researchers have explored local knowledge about environmental change and increasingly over the past decade, local knowledge in relation to climate change specifically. They know much more about the content of the different types of knowledge that are important for responding to climate change-from modeling future rainfall changes in a particular country to how to get the most out of an agricultural environment in highly variable conditions. However, they still do not know how to translate these different forms of knowledge into practice and make them accessible to policymakers, front-line staff (such as agricultural extension officers or health workers), and people in poor communities on the ground. They also have a poor grasp of strategies for bringing together people from different backgrounds and starting points, so that they can reconcile what they know. Bringing together different perspectives is important for both the quality and legitimacy of decisions about adaptation [3]. In African schools, practical demonstrations are needed in order for children to actively use their acquired knowledge and skills to improve society. Teachers should also demonstrate the importance of agriculture in the growth of the nation. In...

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COP 22: Paris Agreement Enters into Force – Celebration and Reality Check
Nov04

COP 22: Paris Agreement Enters into Force – Celebration and Reality Check

COP 22: Paris Agreement Enters into Force – Celebration and Reality Check   By Patricia Espinosa, UNFCCC Executive Secretary And  Salaheddine Mezouar, President of COP22 and Minister of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation of the Kingdom of Morocco   Marrakech, Morocco – Humanity will look back on November 4, 2016, as the day that countries of the world shut the door on inevitable climate disaster and set off with determination towards a sustainable future.   The Paris Climate Change Agreement – the result of the most complex, comprehensive and critical international climate negotiation ever attempted – came into force today.   The Agreement is undoubtedly a turning point in the history of common human endeavor, capturing the combined political, economic and social will of governments, cities, regions, citizens, business and investors to overcome the existential threat of unchecked climate change.   Its early entry into force is a clear political signal that all the nations of the world are devoted to decisive global action on climate change.   Next week’s UN climate change conference in Marrakech represents a new departure for the international community, and the first meeting of the Paris Agreement’s governing body, known as the CMA, will take place during it on November 15.   This is a moment to celebrate. It is also a moment to look ahead with sober assessment and renewed will over the task ahead.   In a short time – and certainly in the next 15 years – we need to see unprecedented reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and unequalled efforts to build societies that can resist rising climate impacts.   The timetable is pressing because globally greenhouse gas emissions which drive climate change and its impacts are not yet falling – a fact which the Marrakech meeting must have at the front of its concerns and collective resolve.   The World Meteorological Organization has now confirmed that the average global concentration in the atmosphere of the main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, reached the symbolic and significant milestone of 400 parts per million for the first time in 2015 and broke new records in 2016.   This means that the world is not nearly on track to meet the Paris Agreement’s primary goal to limit global warming well below 2°C and as close to 1.5°C as possible to prevent dangerous climate tipping points, beyond which we may lose the ability to control the outcome.   Paris delivered a gift of hope for every man, woman and child on the planet. Yet today’s celebration can also rest on the assurance that the policies, technology and finance to achieve these goals not only exist, but...

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COY12: Renforcer l’autonomisation des jeunes
Oct27

COY12: Renforcer l’autonomisation des jeunes

COY12: Renforcer l’autonomisation des jeunes A la veille  de la 12ème Conférence de la jeunesse ( COY12) prévue du 4 au  6 novembre ,  quelques jours avant la  COP 22  à Marrakech, la jeunesse se mobilise et contribue à la lutte contre les changements climatiques. Eraenvironnement.com vous décrit quelques  initiatives. Présentation. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Que signifie la  COY 12 ? La COY 12, en anglais, ” the conference of youth” ( la conférence des jeunes) existe depuis 2005. Organisée chaque année en amont de la Conférence des Parties à la Convention Cadre des Nations Unies sur les Changements Climatiques ( CCNUCC), elle contribue au débat sur l’action climatique par les jeunes. La jeunesse souhaite être parmi les acteurs de  la mise en application de l’Accord de Paris qui entrera en vigueur le 4 novembre prochain. Elle milite pour renforcer son rôle dans la lutte contre les changements climatiques, par l’éducation, le renforcement des capacités et l’autonomisation. “Ce n’est qu’en autonomisant les jeunes dans les différents processus de prise de décision que nécessite la transition vers le bas carbone et une plus grande résilience que la protection du climat est possible. Nous nous réjouissons de fournir une plate-forme pour les jeunes dans la ville de la COP22 pour démontrer l’importance qu’ils ont dans l’action climatique et pour renforcer les réseaux de jeunes africains qui travaillent sur la durabilité et le développement bas carbone”, a déclaré à la CCNUCC récemment Fadoua Brour, membre de l’organisation de la jeunesse marocaine chargée de la conférence de la jeunesse. Dans l’Océan Indien et dans le monde ,  la jeunesse  se mobilise du 28 au 30 octobre . Les travaux effectués serviront de base et seront présentés sous forme de déclaration  lors de la COP22. Mobilisation mondiale Fadoua Brour Présidente et Fondatrice de la Moroccan Youth Climate Movement ( MYCM), Fadoua Brour se définit comme ambitieuse, énergique et positive. Mais cette jeune femme est aussi altruiste. Son combat :  les droits humains. Elle coordonne ainsi le réseau des actions climatiques et des femmes de la planète (WECAN sigle anglais) pour la région du Moyen Orient et de l’Afrique du Nord.  Elle dispose d’ un MBA spécialisé en droits des Affaires.  Fadoua Brour organise des conférences, des caravanes, des campagnes de sensibilisation ainsi que des ateliers en faveur des jeunes et des femmes. Elle fait partie des membres actifs de la douzième édition de la conférence de la Jeunesse ( COY 12).   Le Réseau Climat Océan Indien (RCOI) Comores  composé  de jeunes leaders issus de différents mouvements associatifs accueille  aujourd’hui  la COY12 Océan Indien.  Après Madagascar, l’an dernier, c’est au tour de la jeunesse comorienne d’accueillir 200 jeunes...

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