L’ Afrique, leader de la lutte contre les changements climatiques, pourrait-elle influencer les Etats-Unis?
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L’ Afrique, leader de la lutte contre les changements climatiques, pourrait-elle influencer les Etats-Unis?

L’ Afrique, leader de la lutte contre les changements climatiques, pourrait influencer les Etats-Unis EDITORIAL Par Houmi AHAMED-MIKIDACHE Alors que nous avons récemment remarqué que l’Amérique investit en Afrique dans le domaine environnemental, paradoxalement le pays du Président Donald Trump continue à nier l’existence des changements climatiques. Pourtant, les faits sont là : élévation de la mer, déplacement des populations, sécheresse et chaleur intenses sont fréquentes actuellement aux Etats-Unis, notamment en Californie, avec des pics de chaleurs évalués à 48, 9° Celsius  à Chino près de Los Angeles le 7 juillet dernier, d’après la météo nationale américaine. L’Amérique de Donald Trump vit la Canicule et ses conséquences  comme dans de nombreux pays  en ce moment, et pourtant le gouvernement américain a toujours  l’intention de se retirer   de l’Accord de Paris. Era Environnement, ce mois-ci, vous donnera des explications sur les différentes stratégies des pays d’Afrique pour mettre le climat, l’économie verte et bleue au centre des préoccupations  géostratégiques. Cela pourrait-il impulser sur la décision finale des Etats-Unis dans quelques années ?  A Suivre....

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America promotes Environmental investments in Africa
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America promotes Environmental investments in Africa

 America promotes Environmental investments in Africa By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) President and Chief Executive Officer Ray W. Washburne visited South Africa this week where he met with local banks to discuss investment opportunities to advance development in the country and highlight OPIC-supported projects. It’s the third stop on a six country trip to promote U.S. investment in the region, strengthen partnerships, and find opportunities to work with regional allies on projects that drive economic growth and stability throughout the region. Infrasalience is creating green jobs Among the projects Washburne visited was OPIC-supported SA Taxi which provides loans to entrepreneurs operating minibuses in South Africa. The minibuses are a key part of the South African transportation sector where approximately 67 percent of all travel in South Africa is on a minibus. Each vehicle is a small business which supports the operators, their families and their communities. Washburne met with a number of innovative American businesses and investors including Infrasalience, a company established by American entrepreneurs. The company has developed mobile green chemical plants which profitably transforms air pollution and waste water into sustainable green chemicals. By establishing a process to recycle and reuse industrial and infrastructure waste while simultaneously creating jobs, the company is helping to bring American ingenuity and business values to emerging markets. Exploring investment opportunities in Africa Washburne is traveling to Africa to explore investment opportunities and to highlight OPIC’s new Connect Africa initiative to invest more than $1 billion in transportation, technology and value chains on the continent. Earlier this month, Washburne earlier traveled to Zambia and Rwanda where he visited American coffee processing facilities and met with heads of state. His travel on the continent will continue to Botswana, Uganda, and Kenya where he will meet with senior government officials and visit OPIC supported projects. Africa is a longstanding priority for OPIC and accounts for about one-quarter of the agency’s $23 billion global portfolio. As part of his National Security Strategy, President Trump highlighted the need for a modernized approach by the U.S. government to development finance to help grow aspiring partners, promote economic relationships, and increase investment in regions important to American interests....

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AFDB: Africa needs to accelerate private sector investment in infrastructure
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AFDB: Africa needs to accelerate private sector investment in infrastructure

AFDB: Africa needs to accelerate private sector investment in infrastructure By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   The Kenyan Urgent call President Uhuru Kenyatta has made an urgent call for developing and funding bankable infrastructure projects to drive Africa’s growth agenda during the Africa50 General shareholders Meeting held in Nairobi, Kenya. President Kenyatta said support for bankable projects in energy, transport, ICT, water and sanitation provide unprecedented opportunities for private sector participation. “The private sector must step up and help us close the infrastructure gap on the African continent. Public funding is limited, and there are competing priorities,” he said. Kenyatta announced Kenya would double its current shareholding investment in Africa50 to US$ 100 million. “We must have the confidence to trust and invest in our own infrastructure. Let us grow our partnership and make Africa50 a success.” ” A financing gap of US$ $68 – 108 billion” According to statistics provided by the African Development Bank (www.AfDB.org) the continent’s infrastructure funding requirements stand at close to US$ 170 billion a year, leaving a financing gap of US$ $68 – 108 billion. African Development Bank President and Chairman of Africa50, Akinwumi Adesina, said, “We need to act with speed and urgency. Our people expect nothing else.” He emphasized the importance of tackling factors that inhibit private sector infrastructure investments, including high costs of financing, weak regulations,  lack of cost reflective tariffs, low profitability, and weak regulatory frameworks for public-private partnerships. Private sector infrastructure financing in Africa remains low, averaging US$ 6 billion per year. In 2016, the figure dipped to US$ 2.6 billion. Adesina said Africa requires new models of financing infrastructure. “We must work smart to attract greater levels of investment financing for infrastructure development in Africa. Globally, there is approximately a US$ 120 trillion pool of savings and private equity. Africa must creatively attract some of this into the continent,” he said. Africa50 In response to Africa’s infrastructure finance deficit, the African Development Bank has launched the Africa Investment Forum (AIF) set to take place in South Africa in November 2018. The transaction-based forum is expected to be a gathering of global pension funds, sovereign wealth funds and institutional investors, and key private sector players. Adesina commended President Kenyatta for the country’s bold commitment to and investments in infrastructure development over the last 5 years. Infrastructure accounts for 77% of the Bank’s Kenya portfolio. “Mr. President, you were one of the first African leaders to support the creation of Africa50, which I am honored to chair,” said Adesina. “The African Development Bank, of which I am President, helped create Africa50 because we believe new institutional models are needed to close Africa’s...

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World Environment day: ” We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba
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World Environment day: ” We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba

World Environment day: “We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba*   On World Environment Day, there are plenty of words spoken about the obvious damage being wreaked by climate change – the chaos of hurricanes, wild fires and melting polar ice caps is there for all to see. But there’s another more hidden casualty of this new world of rising temperatures, drought, and increased natural disasters:  the education of our young people. At the simplest level, the wilder weather that we’re already seeing means children are prevented from getting to school. Hurricanes Irma and Harvey meant 1.7 millionUS students were temporarily unable to go to school last year – and officials in Puerto Rico have also recently announced plans to close over 280 schools following the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria. “Climate change is compounding educational inequalities that already exist” In wealthier nations, the damage caused by the increasing occurrence of extreme weather events more often than not tends to cause temporary disruption to children’s education.  But in poorer countries, the consequences can be far more long lasting. Buildings and infrastructure can take months or years to rebuild, with devastating implications for learning. Girls are most likely to be taken out of school in the wake of climate-related shocks, as was found in studies in Pakistan and Uganda after natural disasters there. So, indirectly, climate change is compounding educational inequalities that already exist. But the hardest hit parts of the world are those where universal education is still denied millions and Sub-Saharan Africa is on the front lines. Adult literacyrates are around 65%, compared to a global average of 86%. Here, over a fifth of childrenaged 6-11 are out of school, and a third of those aged 12-14. In Rwanda, we know the devastating impact of being forced from one’s home can have on a child’s education. But the big refugee crises of the future will not just be driven by war, but by the environment, with experts warning tens of millionsare likely to be displaced in the next decade by droughts and crop failures brought about by climate change.  What’s more, rising temperatures are predicted to result in the spread of lethal diseases. It is thought that a 2°C rise in temperatures could lead to an additional 40-60 million people in Africa being exposed to malaria. The disease is already one of the most significant factors in student absenteeism on the continent, with estimates ranging from 13 – 50%depending on the region.  Environmental changes are diminishing children’s education in other ways too. Malnourishmentdirectly affects children’s ability to learn. The World Food Programme has identified hunger and malnutrition as one of the most significant impacts of...

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Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa
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Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa

Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa   Some 800 delegates from 59 countries, including ministers and other high-level government and international officials, together with non-state delegates, offered their insights into the challenges and possible responses to climate change, and harvested those insights for consideration in the official international climate negotiation process. Explanation. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache with UNFCCC   The collecting of views – under the banner of the year-long Talanoa Dialogue launched at negotiations in Bonn, Germany, in November 2017 – was a key part of Africa Climate Week that just concluded in Nairobi (Kenya). During this Africa Climate Week, co-organized with the African Development Bank and member of the Nairobi Framework Partnership ( NFP), from 9th to 13th April in Nairobi ( Kenya), some 800 delegates from 59 countries, including ministers and other high level expressed their responses to the threat of climate change, and harvested other insights for consideration in the official international climate negotiations process.  Action on climate change and sustainable development together are the keys for the development of Africa. The Nairobi Framework Partnership (NFP) is celebrating this year its 10th anniversary, as is the Africa Carbon Forum, which was launched by NFP to spur investment in climate action through carbon markets, mechanisms and finance. The NFP members include: the African Development Bank, Asian Development Bank, International Emissions Trading Association, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), UNEP DTU Partnership, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, United Nations Development Programme, UN Climate Change, and World Bank Group. Cooperating organizations include: Africa Low Emission Development Partnership, Climate Markets and Investment Association, Development Bank of Latin America, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, Inter-American Development Bank, Latin American Energy Organization and West African Development Bank. What was their messages exactly? At the first regional Talanoa event since the launch in Bonn, delegates distilled their deliberations into key messages: Finance – Public finance must be instrumental in unlocking private finance Markets – Carbon markets are about doing more together, and doing more with less Energy – Energy is a high priority, affecting everything. Financial instruments should be put in place to de-risk investment and enhance involvement in smaller and medium-sized enterprises Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – Achieving the SDGs, including the climate one is the only way forward Technology – Businesses are ready to pick up new technology solutions, provided there is a good business case. The voice of the private sector is needed now more than ever. “We are engaged across most of the Sustainable Development Goals and clearly focusing on how to create synergy between the different goals and especially with the climate goal, which is...

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La finance climat: la clé du développement des pays du Sud
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La finance climat: la clé du développement des pays du Sud

La finance climat: la clé du développement des pays du Sud En cette fin d’année 2017 et à l’aube de l’année 2018, nous tenons à remercier tous nos lecteurs qui nous suivent depuis deux ans. C’est une aventure semée d’embûches, mais nous ne nous décourageons pas. Merci de votre soutien indéfectible. Era Environnement vous propose une série d’articles inédits à lire sans modération pendant tout le  mois de janvier . Des articles instructifs sur des pays d’Afrique tels que le Liberia, le Niger, le Nigeria, l’Afrique du Sud, les Comores et d’autres pays. Mais Era Environnement revient également sur la  COP 23, sur le One Planet Summit sur notamment la finance climat. Même s’il n’existe à ce jour aucune définition de cette notion pourtant essentielle au développement des pays du Sud. Faits importants : un équilibre semble se dessiner entre les deux hémisphères nord et sud.  Plus la finance climat intègre les notions d’investissement durable, plus il est nécessaire pour les pays développés de favoriser l’accès à ces mécanismes aux pays du Sud. L’action climatique en est la clé. Principal pilier : les énergies renouvelables et les mécanismes liés à la réduction de gaz à effet de serre. Exemple probant : le prix du carbone. L’Ethiopie et le Nigeria, deux pays d’Afrique utilisent ce mécanisme comme stratégie de développement autour de la promotion des énergies renouvelables. L’année 2018 sera donc une année propice pour le continent africain, une année ou les 54 états devront accentuer la mise en œuvre de leur programme de développement sobre en carbone, une année où les investisseurs devront rendre visible la monnaie attendue et une année où les questions d’adaptation aux changements climatiques pourraient intégrer, pour la première fois,  les notions de rentabilité et d’investissement durable. Encore une fois, Era Environnement suivra pour vous toutes ces actions. Meilleurs vœux 2018. Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Fondatrice et rédactrice en chef du site eraenvironnement.com...

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