World Environment day: ” We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba
Juin05

World Environment day: ” We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba

World Environment day: “We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba*   On World Environment Day, there are plenty of words spoken about the obvious damage being wreaked by climate change – the chaos of hurricanes, wild fires and melting polar ice caps is there for all to see. But there’s another more hidden casualty of this new world of rising temperatures, drought, and increased natural disasters:  the education of our young people. At the simplest level, the wilder weather that we’re already seeing means children are prevented from getting to school. Hurricanes Irma and Harvey meant 1.7 millionUS students were temporarily unable to go to school last year – and officials in Puerto Rico have also recently announced plans to close over 280 schools following the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria. “Climate change is compounding educational inequalities that already exist” In wealthier nations, the damage caused by the increasing occurrence of extreme weather events more often than not tends to cause temporary disruption to children’s education.  But in poorer countries, the consequences can be far more long lasting. Buildings and infrastructure can take months or years to rebuild, with devastating implications for learning. Girls are most likely to be taken out of school in the wake of climate-related shocks, as was found in studies in Pakistan and Uganda after natural disasters there. So, indirectly, climate change is compounding educational inequalities that already exist. But the hardest hit parts of the world are those where universal education is still denied millions and Sub-Saharan Africa is on the front lines. Adult literacyrates are around 65%, compared to a global average of 86%. Here, over a fifth of childrenaged 6-11 are out of school, and a third of those aged 12-14. In Rwanda, we know the devastating impact of being forced from one’s home can have on a child’s education. But the big refugee crises of the future will not just be driven by war, but by the environment, with experts warning tens of millionsare likely to be displaced in the next decade by droughts and crop failures brought about by climate change.  What’s more, rising temperatures are predicted to result in the spread of lethal diseases. It is thought that a 2°C rise in temperatures could lead to an additional 40-60 million people in Africa being exposed to malaria. The disease is already one of the most significant factors in student absenteeism on the continent, with estimates ranging from 13 – 50%depending on the region.  Environmental changes are diminishing children’s education in other ways too. Malnourishmentdirectly affects children’s ability to learn. The World Food Programme has identified hunger and malnutrition as one of the most significant impacts of...

Read More
Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa
Avr14

Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa

Climate Week: Climate and Sustainable development actions: A key for Africa   Some 800 delegates from 59 countries, including ministers and other high-level government and international officials, together with non-state delegates, offered their insights into the challenges and possible responses to climate change, and harvested those insights for consideration in the official international climate negotiation process. Explanation. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache with UNFCCC   The collecting of views – under the banner of the year-long Talanoa Dialogue launched at negotiations in Bonn, Germany, in November 2017 – was a key part of Africa Climate Week that just concluded in Nairobi (Kenya). During this Africa Climate Week, co-organized with the African Development Bank and member of the Nairobi Framework Partnership ( NFP), from 9th to 13th April in Nairobi ( Kenya), some 800 delegates from 59 countries, including ministers and other high level expressed their responses to the threat of climate change, and harvested other insights for consideration in the official international climate negotiations process.  Action on climate change and sustainable development together are the keys for the development of Africa. The Nairobi Framework Partnership (NFP) is celebrating this year its 10th anniversary, as is the Africa Carbon Forum, which was launched by NFP to spur investment in climate action through carbon markets, mechanisms and finance. The NFP members include: the African Development Bank, Asian Development Bank, International Emissions Trading Association, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), UNEP DTU Partnership, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, United Nations Development Programme, UN Climate Change, and World Bank Group. Cooperating organizations include: Africa Low Emission Development Partnership, Climate Markets and Investment Association, Development Bank of Latin America, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, Inter-American Development Bank, Latin American Energy Organization and West African Development Bank. What was their messages exactly? At the first regional Talanoa event since the launch in Bonn, delegates distilled their deliberations into key messages: Finance – Public finance must be instrumental in unlocking private finance Markets – Carbon markets are about doing more together, and doing more with less Energy – Energy is a high priority, affecting everything. Financial instruments should be put in place to de-risk investment and enhance involvement in smaller and medium-sized enterprises Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – Achieving the SDGs, including the climate one is the only way forward Technology – Businesses are ready to pick up new technology solutions, provided there is a good business case. The voice of the private sector is needed now more than ever. “We are engaged across most of the Sustainable Development Goals and clearly focusing on how to create synergy between the different goals and especially with the climate goal, which is...

Read More
La finance climat: la clé du développement des pays du Sud
Déc31

La finance climat: la clé du développement des pays du Sud

La finance climat: la clé du développement des pays du Sud En cette fin d’année 2017 et à l’aube de l’année 2018, nous tenons à remercier tous nos lecteurs qui nous suivent depuis deux ans. C’est une aventure semée d’embûches, mais nous ne nous décourageons pas. Merci de votre soutien indéfectible. Era Environnement vous propose une série d’articles inédits à lire sans modération pendant tout le  mois de janvier . Des articles instructifs sur des pays d’Afrique tels que le Liberia, le Niger, le Nigeria, l’Afrique du Sud, les Comores et d’autres pays. Mais Era Environnement revient également sur la  COP 23, sur le One Planet Summit sur notamment la finance climat. Même s’il n’existe à ce jour aucune définition de cette notion pourtant essentielle au développement des pays du Sud. Faits importants : un équilibre semble se dessiner entre les deux hémisphères nord et sud.  Plus la finance climat intègre les notions d’investissement durable, plus il est nécessaire pour les pays développés de favoriser l’accès à ces mécanismes aux pays du Sud. L’action climatique en est la clé. Principal pilier : les énergies renouvelables et les mécanismes liés à la réduction de gaz à effet de serre. Exemple probant : le prix du carbone. L’Ethiopie et le Nigeria, deux pays d’Afrique utilisent ce mécanisme comme stratégie de développement autour de la promotion des énergies renouvelables. L’année 2018 sera donc une année propice pour le continent africain, une année ou les 54 états devront accentuer la mise en œuvre de leur programme de développement sobre en carbone, une année où les investisseurs devront rendre visible la monnaie attendue et une année où les questions d’adaptation aux changements climatiques pourraient intégrer, pour la première fois,  les notions de rentabilité et d’investissement durable. Encore une fois, Era Environnement suivra pour vous toutes ces actions. Meilleurs vœux 2018. Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Fondatrice et rédactrice en chef du site eraenvironnement.com...

Read More
One Planet Summit: ” Ce sommet ne se substitue pas aux mécanismes de la COP “- Seyni Nafo
Déc17

One Planet Summit: ” Ce sommet ne se substitue pas aux mécanismes de la COP “- Seyni Nafo

One Planet Summit: ” Ce sommet ne se substitue pas aux mécanismes de la COP “- Seyni Nafo Présent récemment au One Planet Summit, l’ambassadeur malien pour le climat, président du groupe des négociateurs africains en fin d’exercice et directeur intérimaire de l’unité indépendante de mise en œuvre de l’initiative africaine d’accès à l’énergie, Seyni Nafo revient sur les points essentiels de l’Accord de Paris et se confie à Era Environnement dans un entretien fleuve.   Era Environnement : Que pensez-vous des douze engagements présentés lors du One Planet Summit ? Seyni Nafo : Je salue ces engagements. Mais, je suis plutôt intéressé par l’annonce du président Macron : la mise en place d’un dispositif de vérification de la mise en œuvre de ces engagements. J’ai envie de prendre attache avec son équipe pour savoir quelles vont être les modalités de mise en application de ce dispositif. Je salue par ailleurs les engagements individuels des pays. Comment pourriez-vous définir le One Planet Summit ? Ce sommet ne vient pas d’une résolution de la Conférence des Nations Unies sur les Changements Climatiques. C’est un sommet positif qui veut mobiliser l’ensemble des acteurs et  accélérer les efforts,  pour relancer la dynamique. On appelle ça un push politique. Au regard de la situation dans laquelle nous sommes depuis l’annonce de  retrait du président Trump, il faut apprécier toutes les actions politiques qui tentent de mobiliser l’ensemble des acteurs pour remettre le climat en haut de l’agenda de l’action au niveau global. Mais, il ne faut pas oublier les négociations formelles : les pays développés et en développement ont pris des engagements dans l’Accord de Paris, à l’exception des Etats-Unis. Il existe  un dispositif de mécanisme de suivi et d’évaluation, des mesures de reporting  et de vérification des engagements de l’Accord de Paris. Ce sommet ne se substitue pas aux   mécanismes de la COP et de la Convention Cadre des Nations Unies sur les Changements Climatiques. Cette plateforme que veut mettre en place le président Macron est une bonne chose : cela permettra aux acteurs présents le 12 décembre  dernier de suivre leurs engagements. Si j’ai bien compris, l’objectif est de faire un point annuel sur les  engagements du Sommet. Et c’est très important. Ce sommet à réussi à mobiliser de nombreuses personnalités du cinéma, du secteur privé, des banques centrales…C’était très positif. Lors de ce Sommet, le Secrétaire Général des Nations Unies, Antonio Gutierez a fait  référence aux 100 milliards de dollars par an attendus en 2020 en disant : «  n’oublions pas les 100 milliards de dollars attendus en 2020 ». Que représente pour vous cette affirmation ? Effectivement, il a évoqué le sujet à deux ou trois reprises. C’est un acte...

Read More
One Planet Summit : Les 12 engagements internationaux et français à suivre
Déc13

One Planet Summit : Les 12 engagements internationaux et français à suivre

One Planet Summit : Les 12 engagements  internationaux et français à suivre Au bout d’une longue journée, marquée par la tenue de différentes panels autour du financement climat, et imprégnée notamment par une très forte présence de collégiens français ( 251), le président de la République, Emmanuel Macron, accompagné par Jim Yong Kim, président de la Banque Mondiale et le Secrétaire Général de l’ONU, Antonio Guttierez, a décliné  les 12 engagements des différents acteurs présents pendant le One Planet Summit. Une plateforme de suivi devrait être mise en place à la fin de l’année et un rendez-vous  devrait avoir lieu annuellement pour le faire le point sur les différentes avancées.  Era Environnement décrypte pour vous ces engagements . Analyse. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Premier Engagement: Aider les Petits Etats Insulaires en Développement Face aux dernières catastrophes naturelles dans les Caraïbes, un fonds public-privé vient d’être crée : le climate Smart Zone.  Le Climat Smart Zone est le fruit d’une vision partagée entre différents acteurs notamment  au niveau régional et international.  Ainsi,  11 pays de la Caricom, Caribbean Community en anglais, ont décidé de former un partenariat avec des organisations internationales et régionales, des entreprises et des fondations, pour mettre en œuvre catalyser les investissements bas carbones dans les domaines prioritaires des réseaux énergétiques et des infrastructures dans les cinq prochaines années. De fait, de nouveaux instruments et véhicules financiers seront déployés pour soutenir cette ambition : plus de 3Mds de dollars sont d’ores et déjà mobilisés. Le processus de reconstruction dans les Antilles (SaintMartin) s’intégrera dans cette initiative  avec une nouvelle ligne de financement pour l’adaptation au changement climatique. En parallèle du One Planet Summit, un protocole d’entente a été signé entre le Niger, les Comores et la Tunisie, l’île Maurice et  l’Agence Française de Développement.  Ces pays bénéficient depuis quelques mois d’une assistance technique plus connue sous le nom de  facilité d’ « Adapt’Action ». Mais,  au total, l’Agence Française de Développement va assister  15 pays vulnérables aux changements climatiques pour un coût de 30 millions d’euros. L’élément central de cet accompagnement est    l’adaptation aux changements climatiques. Les 15 pays bénéficiaires sont situés en Afrique, dans le Pacifique, les Caraïbes et l’Océan Indien. . « Cette facilité a démarré juste avant l’été et on est encore dans une phase d’identification des besoins : c’est une facilité qui fait suite au soutien de l’AFD et d’expertise France dans l’élaboration des plans nationaux présentés en amont de la COP 21, » précise Julie Gonnet, experte de l’AFD, en charge de la facilité Adapt’Action. Selon Julie Gonnet, trois composantes caractérisent cet accompagnement : l’appui à la structuration d’une gouvernance climat, un acte directement mis en œuvre par Expertise France*,...

Read More
One  Planet Summit : Pour l’Action climatique
Déc08

One Planet Summit : Pour l’Action climatique

One Planet  Summit: Un Sommet pour l’Action climatique   Quelques semaines après la 23ème  Conférence des Nations Unies sur le climat à Bonn, et deux ans après l’adoption de l’Accord de Paris,  la France, les Nations Unies et la Banque Mondiale réunissent à Paris plus de 4000 personnes dont une cinquantaine de chefs d’Etat, des Organisations Non Gouvernementales,  des institutions du secteur privé et publique ainsi que  des personnalités telles que Leonardo Di Caprio, Arnold Swarchzenegger, ou le prix Nobel de la paix Mohamed Yunus, dans le cadre du Sommet One  Planet Summit. Explications.   Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   L’organisation du One Planet Summit  à Paris a pour ambition d’intégrer de nouvelles actions pour le climat, notamment sur le plan financier,  avait précisé le président de la République Française Emmanuel Macron, lors d’une conférence de presse, tenue à l’issue de la clôture du sommet du G20 au mois de juillet dernier. Lors de la 23ème conférence des Nations Unies sur le climat, les pays du sud ont encore martelé la responsabilité historique des pays développés dans le financement de la lutte contre les changements climatique. Le Fonds pour les pays les moins avancés (PMA) et le Fonds d’adaptation sous le Protocole de Kyoto, des outils de financement de l’adaptation issus des accords de Marrakech et de Bonn en 2001 ont fait l’objet de discussions approfondies. Ces derniers vont servir l’accord de Paris et seront dorénavant financés en conséquence : une réussite pour l’Afrique et les pays en voie de développement  , mais la question du financement des 100 milliards de dollars par an à partir de 2020 reste énigmatique. Elle n’a elle pas fait l’objet de décision,  et celle-ci est d’ailleurs reportée à la prochaine COP en 2018. Pourquoi ce sommet a-t-il lieu à Paris ? Ce sommet a lieu deux ans après l’adoption de l’Accord de Paris qui a pour objectif de réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre de 2 voire 1,5 degrés Celsius. En amont de la 21ème conférence des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques, tous les pays membres des Nations Unies ont présenté leur plan d’action national de réduction de gaz à effet de serre, mais ces plans nationaux réunis sont insuffisants pour atteindre les objectifs de l’Accord de Paris. Toutefois, le texte de Paris prévoit une révision de ces plans nationaux tous les cinq ans. Mais les prévisions ne sont pas bonnes. La huitième édition du rapport annuel de l’ONU sur l’écart entre les besoins et les perspectives en matière de réduction des émissions, publiée en amont de la Conférence de l’ONU sur les changements climatiques à Bonn, révèle que les engagements...

Read More

En continuant à utiliser le site, vous acceptez l’utilisation des cookies. Plus d’informations

Les paramètres des cookies sur ce site sont définis sur « accepter les cookies » pour vous offrir la meilleure expérience de navigation possible. Si vous continuez à utiliser ce site sans changer vos paramètres de cookies ou si vous cliquez sur "Accepter" ci-dessous, vous consentez à cela.

Fermer