Poor plant bio-security: A threat to regional food security integration
Mar23

Poor plant bio-security: A threat to regional food security integration

   Poor plant bio-security: A threat to regional food security integration By Newton Vusa Sibanda While intra-regional agricultural trade can reduce food insecurity and be a stepping stone to industrialization, poor bio-security control capacity remains a major obstacle to trade in agricultural products, and can therefore limit income and food security of farmers, according to recent bio-security meeting. Indeed, biosecurity experts from 10 Central and East African countries met in Lusaka ( Zambia) recently for the fourth Africa Plant Biosecurity Network workshop.    Common Market The network meetings are a key component of the Australia-Africa Plant Biosecurity Partnership (AAPBP. It brought together African biosecurity professional fellows and industry members from Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe with Australian biosecurity colleagues to share information, provide ongoing mentoring, and boost training and outreach. It also improved national and regional quarantine and plant protection capacity, thereby lifting crop yields, enabling safe regional trade, expanding international market access opportunities and securing greater food security for the region. Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) secretary General Sindiso Ngwenya is upbeat about the prospects of regional integration and called for efforts to address constraints such as poor bio-security control capacity. Mr Ngwenya said that a key result of regional integration should be increased intra-regional trade. Intra-regional trade has indeed increased from US$3.2 billion in 2000 when the free trade area (FTA) was launched to around US$20 billion. “However, this still amounts to less than 10 percent of total trade with the world. The secretariat has done a study to show that although intra-COMESA trade is currently low, there is a potential trade worth US$82 billion,” he said. “We need to work out how to realise that enormous potential,” Mr Ngwenya added. To him, many of COMESA’s 19 member states heavily dependent on agriculture, the production and trade of agricultural produce is of high priority. “Intra-regional agricultural trade can  reduce food insecurity, so we must address constraints to this trade such as biosecurity,” Mr Ngwenya said. “Those army worms do not need visas to cross borders. As COMESA, we are trying to open borders for free movement but not in a devastating manner like army worms,” he claimed. He attributed the lower intra-regional trade to costs of non-tariff measures, including sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) or biosecurity, which he said are higher than they need to be.  COMESA is leading studies to examine the actual costs of SPS measures,  and how they can be reduced without affecting the levels of protection they are designed to provide, he recalled. Agriculture: challenges Zambia’s acting minister of Agriculture Jean Kapata said agriculture is a priority sector in Zambia as...

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To Bonn and Beyond
Fév14

To Bonn and Beyond

To Bonn and Beyond Message from the Incoming COP 23 President Prime Minister of Fiji Frank Bainimarama   Maintaining  the momentum of the Paris Agreement Bula vinaka! Wherever you are the world, I convey my warmest greetings, along with the greetings of the Fijian people. Fiji assumes the Presidency of COP 23 determined to maintain the momentum of the 2015 Paris Agreement and the concerted effort to reduce carbon emissions and lower the global temperature, which was reinforced at COP 22 in Marrakesh. To use a sporting analogy so beloved in our islands, the global community cannot afford to drop the ball on the decisive response agreed to in Paris to address the crisis of global warming that we all face, wherever we live on the planet. That ball is being passed to Fiji and I intend, as the first incoming COP president from a Small Island Developing State, to run with it as hard as I can. We must again approach this year’s deliberations in Bonn as a team – every nation playing its part to combat the rising sea levels, extreme weather events and changing weather patterns associated with climate change. And I will be doing everything possible to keep the team that was assembled in Paris together and totally focused on the best possible outcome. “Our concerns are the concerns of the entire world” I intend to act as COP President on behalf of all 7.5 billion people on the planet. But I bring a particular perspective to these negotiations on behalf of some of those who are most vulnerable to the effects of climate change – Pacific Islanders and the residents of other SIDS countries and low-lying areas of the world. Our concerns are the concerns of the entire world, given the scale of this crisis. We must work together as a global community to increase the proportion of finance available for climate adaptation and resilience building. We need a greater effort to develop products and models to attract private sector participation in the area of adaptation finance. To this end, I will be engaging closely with governments, NGOs, charitable foundations, civil society and the business community. I appeal to the entire world to support Fiji’s effort to continue building the global consensus to confront the greatest challenge of our age. We owe it not only to ourselves but to future generations to tackle this issue head on before it is too late. And I will be counting on that support all the way to Bonn and beyond....

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Casablanca : Remise du prix « Startup Africaine de l’Année 2017» le 26 janvier 2017
Jan24

Casablanca : Remise du prix « Startup Africaine de l’Année 2017» le 26 janvier 2017

Casablanca : Remise du prix « Startup Africaine de l’Année 2017» le 26 janvier 2017 Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Le 26 janvier prochain le prix «  Startup Africaine de l’Année 2017 sera remis à Casablanca. Après  deux éditions organisées en France, le  magazine collaboratif des startups et le Groupe OCP, leader mondial du marché des phosphates et ses dérivés et acteur engagé pour une agriculture durable en Afrique, se sont associés pour lancer la première édition africaine du concours Startup de l’Année « Startup of the Year / Africa 2017 » à l’occasion de la COP 22. Son objectif : promouvoir le développement économique et social du continent africain grâce à des startups innovantes et performantes.Une multitude d’entreprises de renom telles que PwC, ENGIE ou encore MICROSOFT participeront à...

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Ces femmes vont-elles bénéficier de l’initiative Triple A?
Nov25

Ces femmes vont-elles bénéficier de l’initiative Triple A?

Ces femmes vont-elles bénéficier de l’initiative Triple A? D’après la déclaration de Marrakech, les Etats devraient ” renforcer et soutenir les efforts pour éradiquer la pauvreté, assurer la sécurité alimentaire, et prendre des mesures rigoureuses pour lutter contre les défis des changements climatiques dans le domaine de l’agriculture.” Pour pallier aux manques de connaissances sur les changements climatiques, le Bénin, devrait bientôt abriter un centre de recherche agricole, a récemment informé le président du Bénin, Patrice Talon, lors du Segment de Haut Niveau pendant la COP 22 . Où doivent se positionner les femmes béninoises ? Alors qu’elles se battent pour avoir droit aux terres, elles font face aujourd’hui à plusieurs défis : l’impossibilité d’agir face aux changements climatiques et le manque d’accompagnement. Ces Femmes de Kpero Guerra dans la Commune de Parakou ( la plus grande ville du Nord du Bénin) pourront-elles bénéficier de l’initiative Triple A, Adaptation, Agriculture, Africaine? Reportage d’Hippolyte Agossou Ces femmes vont-elles bénéficier de l’initiative Triple...

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COP 22: Les interrogations de la mise en oeuvre
Nov08

COP 22: Les interrogations de la mise en oeuvre

COP 22: Les interrogations de la mise en oeuvre La COP 22 s’est ouverte ce lundi  sur une note d’espoir : l’action. Elle  sera le maître mot des négociations, selon la présidence marocaine. Mais, quelle sera l’issue finale de cette Conférence des Parties  ? Les mécanismes de transparence liés  à la feuille de route du financement seront-ils opérationnels ? L’adaptation, priorité des pays vulnérables notamment d’Afrique, sera-t-elle mieux positionnée dans le financement climat ? La gestion des risques climatiques sera-t-elle réellement pris en compte  pour une limitation de gaz à effet de serre de moins de 2°C  d’ici 2100? Qui seront les scientifiques qui répondront positivement à l’appel du président du GIEC, Hoesung Lee, pour rédiger le rapport  sur les 1, 5°C ( publication prévue  en 2018)? L’accès aux énergies renouvelables pour l’Afrique permettra-t-il  à d’autres pays en développement d’obtenir gain de cause? Les 10 milliards de dollars annoncés pour l’électrification de l’Afrique auront-ils une feuille de route ? Quels sont les pays africains précurseurs ? La coalition sur le prix du carbone incitera-t-elle d’autres pays  à avoir un prix du carbone ?  La transition énergétique passera-t-elle par les villes ?  Les femmes auront-elles enfin le pouvoir d’exprimer leurs doléances et agir par la suite ? La jeunesse pourra-t-elle saisir les opportunités de développement sobre en carbone ? La promotion de l’économie bleue aura-t-elle un impact dans les discussions?  Nous essayerons de répondre à toutes ces questions tout au long des négociations. Houmi...

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COP 22: Paris Agreement Enters into Force – Celebration and Reality Check
Nov04

COP 22: Paris Agreement Enters into Force – Celebration and Reality Check

COP 22: Paris Agreement Enters into Force – Celebration and Reality Check   By Patricia Espinosa, UNFCCC Executive Secretary And  Salaheddine Mezouar, President of COP22 and Minister of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation of the Kingdom of Morocco   Marrakech, Morocco – Humanity will look back on November 4, 2016, as the day that countries of the world shut the door on inevitable climate disaster and set off with determination towards a sustainable future.   The Paris Climate Change Agreement – the result of the most complex, comprehensive and critical international climate negotiation ever attempted – came into force today.   The Agreement is undoubtedly a turning point in the history of common human endeavor, capturing the combined political, economic and social will of governments, cities, regions, citizens, business and investors to overcome the existential threat of unchecked climate change.   Its early entry into force is a clear political signal that all the nations of the world are devoted to decisive global action on climate change.   Next week’s UN climate change conference in Marrakech represents a new departure for the international community, and the first meeting of the Paris Agreement’s governing body, known as the CMA, will take place during it on November 15.   This is a moment to celebrate. It is also a moment to look ahead with sober assessment and renewed will over the task ahead.   In a short time – and certainly in the next 15 years – we need to see unprecedented reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and unequalled efforts to build societies that can resist rising climate impacts.   The timetable is pressing because globally greenhouse gas emissions which drive climate change and its impacts are not yet falling – a fact which the Marrakech meeting must have at the front of its concerns and collective resolve.   The World Meteorological Organization has now confirmed that the average global concentration in the atmosphere of the main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, reached the symbolic and significant milestone of 400 parts per million for the first time in 2015 and broke new records in 2016.   This means that the world is not nearly on track to meet the Paris Agreement’s primary goal to limit global warming well below 2°C and as close to 1.5°C as possible to prevent dangerous climate tipping points, beyond which we may lose the ability to control the outcome.   Paris delivered a gift of hope for every man, woman and child on the planet. Yet today’s celebration can also rest on the assurance that the policies, technology and finance to achieve these goals not only exist, but...

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