COP 23 : A half victory for developing countries
Nov18

COP 23 : A half victory for developing countries

COP 23 : A half victory for  developing countries   The Un Climate Change negotiations ended at nearly 7 o’clock this morning with a song from the Fijians.  Started two weeks ago, these negotiations make time to find any compromise between developed and developing countries. As usual. The story. By Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   The implementation of the Paris Agreement have many issues: adaptation and mitigation through the NDCs, loss and damage,   adaptation,  adaptation fund, finance, transfer of technology, transparency, support and capacity building. All these elements have been taken separately through a facilitative dialogue launched during COP 21 in Paris and pursued in Marrakech during COP 22, then in Bonn with the Fiji presidency, and  the Talanoa Dialogue, a conversation between north and south representatives to achieve the long term pathway to 1,5°Celsius.   The Talanoa Dialogue “ We have been doing the job that we were given to do: advance the implementation guidelines of the Paris Agreement, and prepare for more ambitions actions for the Talanoa dialogue in 2018,” said the  Prime minister of Fiji and president of COP 23, Frank Bainimarama. For the Prime Minister of Fiji, there has been a positive momentum in various areas in COP 23 : the global community has embraced the Fiji  concept of grand coalition for greater ambition linking national governments, states and cities, civil society, the private sector and all women around the world. “ We have  launched a global partnership  to provide millions of climate vulnerable people an affordable access to insurance,” said the president of COP 23. For him, this COP has  put people first. It has connected the people who are not experts on climate change to the UN Climate  negotiations. According to him, it showed to the world that these people are facing climate change in their daily lives. What has been achieved? Saturday, 2.40 Am, the African negotiators left again the negotiations rooms and were happy:   “ We got it Adaptation Fund and Article 9.5,” said Ambassador Nafo from Mali and head of the African negotiators group. The decisions adopted says that there will be modalities for the accounting of financial resources provided and mobilized through public intervention in accordance to the article 9 of the Paris Agreement. The Article 9.5 of the Paris Agreement said the Developed country Parties shall biennially communicate indicative quantitative and qualitative information related to finance of both mitigation and adaptation. Back and Forth Last night was marked by Back and Forth from all the delegates. And it continued earlier in this morning.  At 3am, the Republic of Ecuador on behalf of the G77+ China group ( 134 countries) raised again...

Read More
COP 23: Commission Sahel- ” Nous partageons les mêmes défis”- Issifi Boureima
Nov16

COP 23: Commission Sahel- ” Nous partageons les mêmes défis”- Issifi Boureima

COP 23: Commission Sahel- ” Nous partageons les mêmes défis”- Issifi Boureima En marge des travaux de la 23ème Conférence des Nations Unies sur les Changements Climatiques, Issifi Boureima,  le conseiller technique du président du Niger en charge du Climat,  et président du groupe de travail conjoint des experts pour la Commission Climat pour la région du Sahel se confie à Era Environnement, dans un entretien fleuve, sur les enjeux de la Commission Sahel et ses solutions pour le développement de l’Afrique. Interview. Propos recueillis par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Era Environnement: La Commission Sahel a été annoncée en marge de la COP 23, un an après cette annonce, quelles sont les actions entreprises et quel bilan faîtes-vous de vos actions ? Issifi Boureima: La commission a été effectivement lancée en marge de la COP 22,  lors du Sommet de Haut Niveau organisé par le roi du Maroc. Pendant ce sommet une  décision importante a été prise: la création de trois commissions dont la Commission Sahel présidée par le Niger, la Commission du bassin du Congo, dirigée par la présidence de la République du Congo et la Commission des Petits Etats Insulaires en Développement dont la présidence est tenue par le Seychelles. Depuis la COP 22, la Commission Sahel  a mis en place une équipe d’experts autour du ministre de l’environnement de notre pays. Après cette action  nationale, un certain nombre de documents ont été préparés et  envoyés aux différents pays des trois Commissions.   Pour la Commission Sahel, notre premier travail consistait donc à à identifier les pays  membres de cette Commission. Sur le plan climatique, le sahel se définit par le principal indicateur qui est la isohyète (la courbe joignant les points recevant la même quantité de précipitations)   et  se caractérise par une pluviométrie allant de  150 millimètres  à 600 millimètres. Nous avons ainsi défini un espace allant de la Gambie à la corne de l’Afrique. La commission Sahel est composée par  17 pays dont l’Ethiopie, l’Erythrée, Djibouti et aussi  le Cap vert qui se retrouve également dans la Commission des Petits Etats Insulaires en Développement. Le Cap Vert est en fait le 18 ème pays.  Nous avons aussi intégré  le Cameroun : sa pointe nord est au Sahel et  il y  a certains défis que nous partageons avec ce pays notamment la sauvegarde du bassin du lac Tchad. Nous voulons  créer de bonnes conditions de travail à travers  la  synergie entre les trois commissions. Le Cap vert et le Cameroun sont les pays qui peuvent faire l’interface entre les différentes Commissions. La Commission Sahel est-elle donc opérationnelle ? Pour le moment, nous  sommes en phase de préparation. Nous avons préparé deux documents importants sous...

Read More
COP 23: “no time to waste”
Nov07

COP 23: “no time to waste”

 The 2017 UN Climate Change Conference opened on Monday, with the aim of launching nations towards the next level of ambition needed to tackle global warming and put the world on a safer and more prosperous development path, recalled the UNFCCC Secretariat at the opening ceremony. Explanations. By Houmi AHAMED-MIKIDACHE in Bonn   Two years after the adoption of the Paris Climate Change Agreement, this conference held in Bonn and presided by Fiji, the first small island developing state to have this role. “The human suffering caused by intensifying hurricanes, wildfires, droughts, floods and threats to food security caused by climate change means there is no time to waste,” said Mr Frank Bainimarama, the Prime Minister of Fiji and president of COP 23. Critical According to the World Meteorological Organization, 2017 will be one of the three hottest years on records with many high-impact events including catastrophic hurricanes and floods, debilating heatwaves and drought. “The past three years have all been in the top three years in terms of temperature records. This is part of a long term warming trend,” said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas. And he added:  “We have witnessed extraordinary weather, including temperatures topping 50 degrees Celsius in Asia, record-breaking hurricanes in rapid succession in the Caribbean and Atlantic reaching as far as Ireland, devastating monsoon flooding affecting many millions of people and a relentless drought in East Africa. One of the consequences of climate change is food insecurity in developing countries especially. A review of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) found that, in developing countries, agriculture (crops, livestock, fisheries, aquaculture and forestry) accounted for 26% of all the damage and loss associated with medium to large-scale storms, floods and drought. For Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change, it is urgent to act. “The thermometer of risk is rising; the pulse of the planet is racing; people are hurting; the window of opportunity is closing and we must go Further and Faster Together to lift ambition and action to the next defining level, “she said. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the global health impacts of heatwaves depend not only on the overall warming trend, but on how heatwaves are distributed across where people live. Recent research shows that the overall risk of heat-related illness or death has climbed steadily since 1980, with around 30% of the world’s population now living in climatic conditions that deliver prolonged extreme heatwaves. Between 2000 and 2016, the number of vulnerable people exposed to heatwave events has increased by approximately 125 million. The negotiations According to UNFCCC secretariat, COP23 negotiators are keen to move forward on other...

Read More
The November UN Climate Conference: an opportunity to integrate risk management- Column
Oct11

The November UN Climate Conference: an opportunity to integrate risk management- Column

  The November UN Climate Conference: an opportunity to integrate risk management- Column By, Patricia Espinosa, Achim Steiner and Robert Glasser* From Miami and Puerto Rico to Barbuda and Havana, the devastation of this year’s hurricane season across Latin America and the Caribbean serves as a reminder that the impacts of climate change know no borders. In recent weeks, Category 5 hurricanes have brought normal life to a standstill for millions in the Caribbean and on the American mainland. Harvey, Irma and Maria have been particularly damaging. The 3.4 million inhabitants of Puerto Rico have been scrambling for basic necessities including food and water, the island of Barbuda has been rendered uninhabitable, and dozens of people are missing or dead on the UNESCO world heritage island of Dominica. The impact is not confined to this region. The record floods across Bangladesh, India and Nepal have made life miserable for some 40 million people.  More than 1,200 people have died and many people have lost their homes, crops have been destroyed, and many workplaces have been inundated. Meanwhile, in Africa, over the last 18 months 20 countries have declared drought emergencies, with major displacement taking place across the Horn region. For those countries that are least developed the impact of disasters can be severe, stripping away livelihoods and progress on health and education; for developed and middle-income countries the economic losses from infrastructure alone can be massive; for both, these events reiterate the need to act on a changing climate that threatens only more frequent and more severe disasters. A (shocking) sign of things to come? The effects of a warmer climate on these recent weather events, both their severity and their frequency, has been revelatory for many, even the overwhelming majority that accept the science is settled on human-caused global warming. While the silent catastrophe of 4.2 million people dying prematurely each year from ambient pollution, mostly related to the use of fossil fuels, gets relatively little media attention, the effect of heat-trapping greenhouse gases on extreme weather events is coming into sharper focus. It could not be otherwise when the impacts of these weather events are so profound. During the last two years over 40 million people, mainly in countries which contribute least to global warming, were forced either permanently or temporarily from their homes by disasters. There is clear consensus: rising temperatures are increasing the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere, leading to more intense rainfall and flooding in some places, and drought in others. Some areas experience both, as was the case this year in California, where record floods followed years of intense drought. TOPEX/Poseidon, the first satellite to precisely...

Read More
COP 23 : Les projets africains bénéficiaires du fonds vert
Oct09

COP 23 : Les projets africains bénéficiaires du fonds vert

COP 23 : Les projets africains bénéficiaires du fonds vert A quelques semaines de la Conférence des Nations Unies sur le climat, le fonds vert a tenu sa 18ème réunion. 11 projets et programmes ont été approuvés per le fonds, dont trois en Afrique : le Sénégal, l’Ethiopie et l’Egypte. A ce jour, une cinquantaine de projets a  été financée et approuvée par ce fonds destiné à aider les pays en développement à faire face aux changements climatiques. Présentation  des trois projets africains récemment approuvés. Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache L’Ethiopie face à la sécheresse Le fonds vert des Nations Unies pour le Climat vient de faire un don de  45 millions de dollars à l’Ethiopie pour mettre en œuvre un projet d’approvisionnement d’eau potable, par l’utilisation de l’énergie solaire. Ce projet vise notamment à améliorer la gestion des terres en augmentant la recharge d’eau souterraine et le contenu nutritif des sols. Un million de personnes vulnérables aux changements climatiques vont bénéficier de ce projet : les femmes auront un rôle primordial.  En Ethiopie, 80%  de la population vit dans les milieux ruraux et les femmes contribuent principalement  au développement de l’agriculture. Mais les ressources issues de l’exploitation agricoles sont contrôlées par les hommes. Le projet soumis au fonds vert  a été présentée par le ministère éthiopien des finances avec le soutien  du Réseau de connaissance sur le climat et le développement ( CDKN).  D’après, le CDKN, cette initiative va aider l’Ethiopie à mettre en œuvre sa  contribution nationale présentée pendant la COP 21.  La contribution nationale de l’Ethiopie est l’une des plus ambitieuses et l’une des rares contributions nationales qui prônent la réduction de gaz à effet de serre  à,moins  2 degrès celsius, précise le CDKN, un réseau dirigé par une alliance d’organisations dont PricewaterhouseCoopers. Au secours des agriculteurs sénégalais 9,8 millions de dollars ont été accordés par le fonds vert pour un projet de renforcement de la résistance climatique du secteur des petits exploitants agricoles au Sénégal avec  l’appui du Programme alimentaire mondial (PAM) des Nations Unies, accrédité par le fonds vert pour la mise en œuvre du projet. Présenté comme l’un des principaux acteurs de l’innovation de la résilience face aux changements climatiques en faveur de la sécurité alimentaire, le Programme Alimentaire Mondial aide les petits exploitants agricoles à accéder aux informations climatiques, météorologiques et agricoles pertinentes et fiables. En Tanzanie et au Malawi, des petits exploitants agricoles prennent des décisions concernant la gestion des éventuelles sécheresses et inondations par le biais de la radio, d’envoi de SMS et de messages audio sur des téléphones mobiles. Le PAM dispense également des formations de vulgarisation agricole afin de mieux interpréter et diffuser...

Read More
Bénin : Interdiction de l’importation du  Tilapia
Sep24

Bénin : Interdiction de l’importation du Tilapia

Bénin : Interdiction de l’importation du Tilapia Depuis la fin du mois d’août, suite à l’alerte lancée par l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’Alimentation et l’Agriculture (FAO),  le gouvernement béninois n’autorise plus l’importation du poisson Tilapia.   Par Hippolyte AGOSSOU Lundi 28 août 2017, suite à l’alerte lancée par l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’Alimentation et l’Agriculture ( FAO) les deux ministres béninois de l’agriculture, de l’élevage et de la pêche, et  du commerce et l’artisanat, ont formellement interdit l’importation du poisson Tilapia, à travers un communiqué signé conjointement. D’après la FAO,  les poissons tilapia subissent une attaque virale dénommée Tilapia Lake Virus, une épidémie qui extermine les poissons tilapia qu’ils soient en milieu naturel ou en élevage . L’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’Alimentation et l’Agriculture a précisé en août dernier que cinq pays ont fait part de cette épidémie : Israel, la Colombie, l’Equateur, l’Egypte et la Thaïlande. Le   Tilapia  De la famille des Cichlidae et de l’ordre des Perciformes, le tilapia est l’un des poissons exotiques les plus vendus de la planète et par ricochet le plus consommé. Le nom Tilapia s’applique à des poissons généralement de couleur blanche. Il est reconnu comme le poisson d’élevage par excellence. Il est le deuxième type de poisson qui fait objet d’élevage dans le monde après le carpe. C’est donc l’une des principales espèces d’Aquaculture en Afrique et sans doute au Bénin. Comment reconnaître le Tilapia ? Ces espèces se reconnaissent aisément par  la tête. Le tilapia porte une seule narine de chaque côté. Il a un os operculaire non épineux,  un  corps comprimé latéralement. Il porte de longue nageoire dorsale à partie antérieure épineuse, une  nageoire anale avec au moins les 3 premiers rayons épineux. Autres caractéristiques C’est un poisson qui aime la chaleur, Il a souvent besoin d’une température minimal de 15 degrés Celsius. Omnivore brouteur, il se nourrit entre autres de phytoplancton, de plante aquatique, de petit invertébré et de détritus. Cinq à six mois passés dans les étangs lui permet d’atteindre la maturité sexuelle. Etant donné que son incubation est buccale, le Tilapia produit peu d’œufs. Les femelles les plus imposantes en produiront près de 1500 au maximum. Le tilapia du nil peut vivre près de 10 ans et atteindre un poids de 10 Kg et même parfois...

Read More

En continuant à utiliser le site, vous acceptez l’utilisation des cookies. Plus d’informations

Les paramètres des cookies sur ce site sont définis sur « accepter les cookies » pour vous offrir la meilleure expérience de navigation possible. Si vous continuez à utiliser ce site sans changer vos paramètres de cookies ou si vous cliquez sur "Accepter" ci-dessous, vous consentez à cela.

Fermer