COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania
Juil14

COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania

COP 23: Addressing  Loss and Damage in Tanzania Many people remember the last rainy season in May. It has started unusually late. But it has affected people.There are views that the erratic rainy seasons and the high intensity of rainfall are caused by climate change and some negative impacts are now unavoidable. These consequences of human-induced climate change often result in loss and damage.  Analysis by DeodatusMfugale*.     Dar es Salaam July 14, 2017 Many people lost their property Many people remember the last rainy season in May. It has started unusually late. But it has affected people. Residents of Tanga city, located on the Tanzanian northern coast close to the Kenyan border, were pounded by  heavy downpour recently. It was not happened in this town  and around for over four decades. As a result, some sections of roads were washed away by floods while several houses were pulled down. Many people lost their property as some houses were submerged under floodwater. In other places, in one village in Kilimanjaro region, a pastoralist could do nothing but watch helplessly as some of his livestock disappeared during a night. A farmer in Mvomero district of Morogoro region also lost several hectares of maize crop after his farm became waterlogged following heavy rains. Experts said that maize plants cannot survive in pools of water. Several people also lost their lives due to severe flash floods. Agricultural productivity is hardly affected by climate change in Tanzania: soils can no longer support growth of traditional crops. It is forcing people to leave their villages . According to the Ministry for Environment, 61 percent of Tanzania suffer from desertification. “Desertification makes land unsuitable for agriculture and livestock keeping, and Rising sea levels threaten to sink island and saline water has infiltrated freshwater sources, said Sabine Minninger, Climate Change Policy Advisor, Bread for the World. She emphasized: “These have forced members of vulnerable communities to migrate to other areas where they have lost their identity.” Understanding Loss and Damage There are views that the erratic rainy seasons and the high intensity of rainfall are caused by climate change and some negative impacts are now unavoidable. These consequences of human-induced climate change often result in loss and damage.“Loss refers to things that are lost forever and cannot be brought back, such as human lives or species , while damages refer to things that are damaged, but can be repaired or restored, such as roads or embankments, ” explained Saleemul Huq, a senior fellow at the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED). Strengthening flood barriers, planting trees, using new crop varieties and other forms of adaptation...

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To Bonn and Beyond
Fév14

To Bonn and Beyond

To Bonn and Beyond Message from the Incoming COP 23 President Prime Minister of Fiji Frank Bainimarama   Maintaining  the momentum of the Paris Agreement Bula vinaka! Wherever you are the world, I convey my warmest greetings, along with the greetings of the Fijian people. Fiji assumes the Presidency of COP 23 determined to maintain the momentum of the 2015 Paris Agreement and the concerted effort to reduce carbon emissions and lower the global temperature, which was reinforced at COP 22 in Marrakesh. To use a sporting analogy so beloved in our islands, the global community cannot afford to drop the ball on the decisive response agreed to in Paris to address the crisis of global warming that we all face, wherever we live on the planet. That ball is being passed to Fiji and I intend, as the first incoming COP president from a Small Island Developing State, to run with it as hard as I can. We must again approach this year’s deliberations in Bonn as a team – every nation playing its part to combat the rising sea levels, extreme weather events and changing weather patterns associated with climate change. And I will be doing everything possible to keep the team that was assembled in Paris together and totally focused on the best possible outcome. “Our concerns are the concerns of the entire world” I intend to act as COP President on behalf of all 7.5 billion people on the planet. But I bring a particular perspective to these negotiations on behalf of some of those who are most vulnerable to the effects of climate change – Pacific Islanders and the residents of other SIDS countries and low-lying areas of the world. Our concerns are the concerns of the entire world, given the scale of this crisis. We must work together as a global community to increase the proportion of finance available for climate adaptation and resilience building. We need a greater effort to develop products and models to attract private sector participation in the area of adaptation finance. To this end, I will be engaging closely with governments, NGOs, charitable foundations, civil society and the business community. I appeal to the entire world to support Fiji’s effort to continue building the global consensus to confront the greatest challenge of our age. We owe it not only to ourselves but to future generations to tackle this issue head on before it is too late. And I will be counting on that support all the way to Bonn and beyond....

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Casablanca : Remise du prix « Startup Africaine de l’Année 2017» le 26 janvier 2017
Jan24

Casablanca : Remise du prix « Startup Africaine de l’Année 2017» le 26 janvier 2017

Casablanca : Remise du prix « Startup Africaine de l’Année 2017» le 26 janvier 2017 Par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Le 26 janvier prochain le prix «  Startup Africaine de l’Année 2017 sera remis à Casablanca. Après  deux éditions organisées en France, le  magazine collaboratif des startups et le Groupe OCP, leader mondial du marché des phosphates et ses dérivés et acteur engagé pour une agriculture durable en Afrique, se sont associés pour lancer la première édition africaine du concours Startup de l’Année « Startup of the Year / Africa 2017 » à l’occasion de la COP 22. Son objectif : promouvoir le développement économique et social du continent africain grâce à des startups innovantes et performantes.Une multitude d’entreprises de renom telles que PwC, ENGIE ou encore MICROSOFT participeront à...

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Ces femmes vont-elles bénéficier de l’initiative Triple A?
Nov25

Ces femmes vont-elles bénéficier de l’initiative Triple A?

Ces femmes vont-elles bénéficier de l’initiative Triple A? D’après la déclaration de Marrakech, les Etats devraient ” renforcer et soutenir les efforts pour éradiquer la pauvreté, assurer la sécurité alimentaire, et prendre des mesures rigoureuses pour lutter contre les défis des changements climatiques dans le domaine de l’agriculture.” Pour pallier aux manques de connaissances sur les changements climatiques, le Bénin, devrait bientôt abriter un centre de recherche agricole, a récemment informé le président du Bénin, Patrice Talon, lors du Segment de Haut Niveau pendant la COP 22 . Où doivent se positionner les femmes béninoises ? Alors qu’elles se battent pour avoir droit aux terres, elles font face aujourd’hui à plusieurs défis : l’impossibilité d’agir face aux changements climatiques et le manque d’accompagnement. Ces Femmes de Kpero Guerra dans la Commune de Parakou ( la plus grande ville du Nord du Bénin) pourront-elles bénéficier de l’initiative Triple A, Adaptation, Agriculture, Africaine? Reportage d’Hippolyte Agossou Ces femmes vont-elles bénéficier de l’initiative Triple...

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What’s next for climate action ? -Patricia Espinoza
Nov25

What’s next for climate action ? -Patricia Espinoza

What’s next for climate action ? -Patricia Espinoza Shortly after the conclusion of the UN Climate Change Conference in Marrakech, the UN’s top climate change official Patricia Espinosa visited Norway, where she met with government and local leaders and gave a speech at the 2016 Zero Emission Conference in Oslo. Hosted by the Norwegian NGO ZERO, the conference was designed to show that it is possible to create a thriving, modern society without the use of fossil fuels or fossil based materials, and with zero greenhouse gas emissions. In her speech, the Executive Secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Patricia Espinosa summed up the central outcomes of the UN Climate Change Conference in Marrakech, along with outlining the next steps for international, national and local climate action, and addressed the issue of what specifically Norway can do to help implement the Paris Climate Change Agreement.  Her speech     The Marrakech InsightsFirst, I saw unparalleled political will to act on climate change. The momentum that carried us from hundreds of thousands of people in the streets at the People’s Climate March in 2014… to an ambitious agreement in Paris last year has not diminished.Political will brought the Paris Agreement into force just days before this year’s conference in Marrakech, setting a tone for the meeting and allowing us to hold the historic first Conference of the Parties to the Paris Agreement. Second, Marrakech featured close cooperation to advance critical issues, which can be seen in the conference outcomes. Governments took a crucial step towards writing the rules of the Paris Agreement. They outlined the finance, technology and capacity building support that enables the developing world to move to low-emission development and build resilience. Marrakech featured long-term de-carbonization plans from major emitters and medium-income countries.* The Marrakech Action Proclamation unites nations in the determination to implement the Paris Agreement and Sustainable Development Goals.This is all very positive and shows that governments are willing to work together. It also sends a strong signal that we have unstoppable global momentum on climate change and sustainable development. Third and finally, Marrakech shined a light on movement in markets and in the private sector. And it highlighted climate actions by local governments. The business leaders action In markets, we see a transformation to low-emission. The clean energy market is growing and now it makes more sense to choose renewable energy over all others. Investors are moving to cleaner, greener assets to secure stable returns. Throughout the private sector, we see high efficiency operations, sustainable supply chains and products that reduce consumer’s climate footprint. Local governments Local governments are moving in the...

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Seyni Nafo : Plaidoyer pour un financement durable
Nov24

Seyni Nafo : Plaidoyer pour un financement durable

Seyni Nafo : Plaidoyer pour un financement durable Une semaine après la COP 22, le président du groupe des négociateurs africains, Seyni Nafo et ambassadeur pour le climat pour le Mali,  donne son point de vue sur la finance climat et ses solutions. Entretien.   Propos recueillis par Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache   Eraenvironnement.com : Quels étaient les objectifs  des négociateurs à Marrakech ? Seyni Nafo: Nous avions pour objectif de poser les fondements juridico-techniques et opérationnels de l’accord. Que veut dire ce charabia ? Il fallait qu’on se mette d’accord sur la feuille de route qui doit décliner le travail en termes de modalités procédures et directives d’application de l’Accord de Paris. Il comprend tout le régime de transparence sur l’atténuation [réduction de gaz à effet de serre] , sur le suivi financier, sur la  comptabilisation des efforts d’adaptation, tout le rulebook comme on dit en anglais. Nombreux pensent qu’il nous faut deux ans pour terminer toutes les directives et modalités qui accompagnent le texte de Paris. Ce sont ces décisions qui seront prises en 2018. On a donc deux ans de travail technique. En 2018, il y aura un second rendez-vous : la rédaction d’une revue à mi-parcours des efforts, en anglais le « facilitative dialogue ». C’est un dialogue qui  évalue les efforts de réductions de gaz à effet de serre,  et d’adaptation dans un cadre global. Cet exercice doit aboutir à une augmentation de l’ambition, une augmentation du niveau de réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre. En 2018, les vraies décisions devraient être prises. A Marrakech, , il n’y avait pas de décisions à prendre. On devait clarifier la feuille de route de maintenant à 2018.  Nous avions comme mission d’écrire les termes de références, en décrivant le nombre d’ateliers et le nombre de papier techniques à réaliser. Le rapport du Groupe d’experts intergouvernemental sur l’évolution du climat (GIEC) publié en 2018 aura-t-il un impact sur les décisions ? Normalement oui. Il va informer les débats au niveau de l’effort. L’objectif d’un tel rapport est de tirer la sonnette d’alarme et   de mettre une pression positive sur les décideurs. Oui, cela va être important. Généralement, lors des cycles de contributions, au moment où les pays doivent faire des engagements de réduction de gaz à effet de serre, les pays doivent être informés par un rapport du GIEC. C’est pour cette raison que sera publié le rapport spécial 1,5°C. On espère qu’il sera prêt en 2018 pour permettre de tirer la sonnette d’alarme et d’être un argument assez important pour que les pays remontent leurs obligations de réduction de gaz à effet de serre[Actuellement, les émissions de gaz à effet de serre sont...

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