World Environment day: ” We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba
Juin05

World Environment day: ” We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba

World Environment day: “We must not let education become the forgotten casualty of climate change”-Silas Lwakabamba*   On World Environment Day, there are plenty of words spoken about the obvious damage being wreaked by climate change – the chaos of hurricanes, wild fires and melting polar ice caps is there for all to see. But there’s another more hidden casualty of this new world of rising temperatures, drought, and increased natural disasters:  the education of our young people. At the simplest level, the wilder weather that we’re already seeing means children are prevented from getting to school. Hurricanes Irma and Harvey meant 1.7 millionUS students were temporarily unable to go to school last year – and officials in Puerto Rico have also recently announced plans to close over 280 schools following the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria. “Climate change is compounding educational inequalities that already exist” In wealthier nations, the damage caused by the increasing occurrence of extreme weather events more often than not tends to cause temporary disruption to children’s education.  But in poorer countries, the consequences can be far more long lasting. Buildings and infrastructure can take months or years to rebuild, with devastating implications for learning. Girls are most likely to be taken out of school in the wake of climate-related shocks, as was found in studies in Pakistan and Uganda after natural disasters there. So, indirectly, climate change is compounding educational inequalities that already exist. But the hardest hit parts of the world are those where universal education is still denied millions and Sub-Saharan Africa is on the front lines. Adult literacyrates are around 65%, compared to a global average of 86%. Here, over a fifth of childrenaged 6-11 are out of school, and a third of those aged 12-14. In Rwanda, we know the devastating impact of being forced from one’s home can have on a child’s education. But the big refugee crises of the future will not just be driven by war, but by the environment, with experts warning tens of millionsare likely to be displaced in the next decade by droughts and crop failures brought about by climate change.  What’s more, rising temperatures are predicted to result in the spread of lethal diseases. It is thought that a 2°C rise in temperatures could lead to an additional 40-60 million people in Africa being exposed to malaria. The disease is already one of the most significant factors in student absenteeism on the continent, with estimates ranging from 13 – 50%depending on the region.  Environmental changes are diminishing children’s education in other ways too. Malnourishmentdirectly affects children’s ability to learn. The World Food Programme has identified hunger and malnutrition as one of the most significant impacts of...

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Tanzania –Natural Resources: “ Communities  must know their rights and obligations”- Report
Avr11

Tanzania –Natural Resources: “ Communities  must know their rights and obligations”- Report

Tanzania –Natural Resources: “ Communities  must know their rights and obligations”- Report   In a recent workshop held in Dar es Salaam ( Tanzania), experts discussed the recent publication  of the FAO Voluntary Guidelines on Responsible Governance Tenure. Feature.   By Deodatus Mfugale in Dar Es Salaam “Inadequate and insecure tenure rights increase vulnerability, hunger and poverty and can lead to conflict and environmental degradation when competing users fight for the control of the resources,”  an  UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), published recently.   The eradication of hunger and poverty, and the sustainable use of the environment, depend to a great extent on how communities gain access to land, fisheries and forests which in turn is regulated by the exiting tenure systems. Tenure systems define and regulate how communities gain access to natural resources, whether through formal law or informal arrangements.   However tenure systems increasingly face stress as the world’s growing population requires food security, and as environmental degradation and climate change reduces the availability of land, fisheries and forests. This has sparked stiff competition for resources among the various users with marginalized communities getting a raw deal. Many developing countries are endowed with abundant natural resources that could be used to improve the lives of their people and boost the economy of the respective countries. Countries with natural resources like forests, land, fisheries and wildlife could be treading with firm steps on the path to sustainable development but are struggling to feed their people most of whom live in abject poverty. Governance failure in ensuring secure tenure and access to natural resources has denied Tanzanian rural communities from benefitting from existing sources of livelihoods. They have thus failed to attain food security and reduce poverty at family level. How to understand the management of natural resources?  In a recent workshop held in Dar es Salaam to discuss the report, Dr Zacharia Ngeleja of Ardhi University said that the Guidelines contribute to achieving sustainable livelihoods, social stability, housing security, rural development, environmental protection and sustainable social and economic development. While the Voluntary Guidelines merely present principles and internationally accepted standards for practices for the responsible governance of tenure, countries can develop their own strategies and other conditions that may ease the application of the Guidelines. During the workshop participants underscored the need to educate communities on laws, policies, rules and procedures governing tenure of land, forests and fisheries so that they understand their rights and obligations. “If they understand the issues then they can demand for tangible benefits from their responsibility to conserve natural resources and only then can Responsible Governance of Tenure come into play. It...

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African Climate Talks II: Africa needs to act urgently
Avr11

African Climate Talks II: Africa needs to act urgently

African Climate Talks II: Africa needs to act urgently By Olumide Idowu* Participants attending the African Climate Talks II (ACT-II) in Addis Ababa ( Ethiopia) in March,  called Africa to change how it does business to reap the benefits of the Paris Agreement. Attending the two-day talks last month called “Market policy versus market mechanisms in the implementation of the Paris Agreement”, speakers asked for an urgent shift in how the continent will forge ahead to escape the consequences of climate change. Ambassador Lumumba Di-Aping, from South Sudan and former chair of the G77 called for strengthening of the current regime, noting that the current Paris Agreement is fundamentally flawed and inadequate. “The agreement will be the main basis for multilateral cooperation during the first period of commitments (2020-2030). The African Continent in this new architecture is tragically weaker than even before,” Di-Aping said. He urged Africa to reinvent itself consistently through science. “We must think “out of the box” to build the framework for a more effective effort from 2025 onwards – one consistent with Africa’s survival and prosperity,” he said. Dr James Murombedzi, the Officer in Charge of the Africa Climate Centre Policy (ACPC) noted that the continent needs to invest in strong evidence based African narrative. “This narrative should have a science, research and policy interface. We also should invest in informed societies that participate in the shaping of policies and strengthen capacities of countries,” Murombedzi said. “The temperatures are rising and Africa is suffering. Let us unite to save our continent. Let us develop sustainable ways of dealing with climate change,” Woldu said. Di-Aping noted that Africa must move beyond the old dichotomy of “mitigation and adaptation.” “We must look at each sector – agriculture, industry etc – and focus on integrating climate considerations into wider industrial and development planning in an integrated way. The climate regime must focus not just on “emissions reductions” but on the real solutions needed to achieve them,” Di-Aping said. He urged for negotiations which provide a space where these with problems, with solutions and with money, can meet as part of a structured process. “We need to make the UNFCCC more relevant to the real world.  The Africa Renewable Energy Initiative is to be commended as an important step in the energy sector – we need matching initiatives in each other sector,” he said. “Let us think about the financial sector and financial instruments and engineering. If we need a major plan to address 1.50C, the question arises how to fund it. Clearly the $10 billion in the GCF will not be enough; and developed countries have no intention...

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Bénin : L’adaptation au cœur des solutions
Mar24

Bénin : L’adaptation au cœur des solutions

Bénin : L’adaptation au cœur des solutions   Un financement français de 58 millions d’euros vient d’être octroyé au Bénin. Son objectif : permettre à la population de lutter contre les changements climatiques. Explications. Par Hippolyte AGOSSOU     Le 5 mars dernier, le Benin a signé une convention de financement avec l’Agence Française de Développement. Cette convention d’un montant de 58 millions d’euros a pour objectif d’aider à la mise en place du projet d’Adaptation des Villes aux Changements Climatiques. Le projet d’Adaptation des Villes aux Changements Climatiques (PAVIC) est une des composantes préétablie dans le plan d’Action du gouvernement pour aider, par des outils spécifiques, les villes à s’adapter aux conséquences des changements climatiques dans le domaine de l’agriculture, de l’industrie, de la pêche notamment. Son ambition : accompagner un changement de mentalités afin de protéger les zones sensibles et inondables et soutenant des activités qui respectent l’environnement. Autres mission : renforcer les capacités des acteurs locaux des territoires urbains pour faire face aux aléas climatiques en améliorant  leur résilience et en permettant au Bénin de faire face de manière stratégique aux changements climatiques.   « Cet appui important du gouvernement français aidera le Bénin à atteindre les objectifs fixés dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre de ce projet contenu dans le Plan d’Action du Gouvernement du Président Patrice TALON, »  a indiqué le ministre béninois du cadre de vie José Didier TONATO. Quatre villes vont bénéficier du programme : Bohicon, Comé, Cotonou et Sèmè-Podji. L’Afrique est considérée comme l’un des continents les plus vulnérables au changement climatique. La plupart des pays africains comme le Bénin témoignent vraisemblablement de grande difficultés à s’adapter aux effets de cette mutations environnementale. De fait,  les autorités béninoises en charge du cadre de vie multiplient les actions pour identifier de potentiels partenaires pouvant les aider  techniquement et financièrement dans le processus d’adaption des populations. La France est considérée comme un des partenaires privilégiés du Bénin.  ...

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Fighting climate change in Liberia
Jan25

Fighting climate change in Liberia

A few months after COP 23 and a few days after the  inauguration of the new President of Liberia, George Weah, Era Environnement shares with you the interview of the National Coordinator of the Green Climate Fund in Liberia, Jeremiah G. Sokan. This interview took place in Bonn, Germany during COP 23 by Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache.             Introduction to Jeremiah G. Sokan and his view on climate finance during COP 23       JeremiahSokanLiberia His view on the US position on the Paris Agreement and the consequences for the implementation of the Paris Accord.       JeremiahSokanLiberia2 What can be the role of the African Presidents for the implementation of the Paris Agreement? How about Liberia and its climate change policy toward the youth?...

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La finance climat: la clé du développement des pays du Sud
Déc31

La finance climat: la clé du développement des pays du Sud

La finance climat: la clé du développement des pays du Sud En cette fin d’année 2017 et à l’aube de l’année 2018, nous tenons à remercier tous nos lecteurs qui nous suivent depuis deux ans. C’est une aventure semée d’embûches, mais nous ne nous décourageons pas. Merci de votre soutien indéfectible. Era Environnement vous propose une série d’articles inédits à lire sans modération pendant tout le  mois de janvier . Des articles instructifs sur des pays d’Afrique tels que le Liberia, le Niger, le Nigeria, l’Afrique du Sud, les Comores et d’autres pays. Mais Era Environnement revient également sur la  COP 23, sur le One Planet Summit sur notamment la finance climat. Même s’il n’existe à ce jour aucune définition de cette notion pourtant essentielle au développement des pays du Sud. Faits importants : un équilibre semble se dessiner entre les deux hémisphères nord et sud.  Plus la finance climat intègre les notions d’investissement durable, plus il est nécessaire pour les pays développés de favoriser l’accès à ces mécanismes aux pays du Sud. L’action climatique en est la clé. Principal pilier : les énergies renouvelables et les mécanismes liés à la réduction de gaz à effet de serre. Exemple probant : le prix du carbone. L’Ethiopie et le Nigeria, deux pays d’Afrique utilisent ce mécanisme comme stratégie de développement autour de la promotion des énergies renouvelables. L’année 2018 sera donc une année propice pour le continent africain, une année ou les 54 états devront accentuer la mise en œuvre de leur programme de développement sobre en carbone, une année où les investisseurs devront rendre visible la monnaie attendue et une année où les questions d’adaptation aux changements climatiques pourraient intégrer, pour la première fois,  les notions de rentabilité et d’investissement durable. Encore une fois, Era Environnement suivra pour vous toutes ces actions. Meilleurs vœux 2018. Houmi Ahamed-Mikidache Fondatrice et rédactrice en chef du site eraenvironnement.com...

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